ONeill confident Barry will stay at Villa

first_imgTopics O’Neill confident Barry will stay at Villa Share on Twitter First published on Wed 7 May 2008 22.32 EDT Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest Gareth Barry’s impressive form for Aston Villa saw him cement a place in the England Squad. Photograph: Ian Kington/AFP/Getty Images Shares00 Share on LinkedIn @StuartJamesGNM Martin O’Neill says Liverpool are “a million miles away” from signing Gareth Barry, with the Aston Villa manager insisting that he remains hopeful of convincing the England international to commit his future to the club. O’Neill, who confirmed that he has spoken to Barry about Liverpool’s bid last Friday, has also warned Rafael Benítez that the club’s £10m offer for the Villa captain significantly undervalues the player.The Villa manager will hold further talks with Barry after Sunday’s final league match at West Ham United but, with the owner Randy Lerner’s support, is optimistic that he can persuade the 27-year-old to sign a new contract and reject Liverpool’s advances. “Keeping him at Aston Villa is as important as anything we do in the transfer market,” said O’Neill, who persuaded Barry to turn down a move to Portsmouth two years ago when he first took over.”I must clarify this point, as we speak, we are a million miles away [from Barry joining Liverpool],” said O’Neill, who was upset that details of the bid were leaked on Merseyside. “At the moment, it would be like me offering £20m for [Lionel] Messi. Barcelona would say, ‘So what?’ That’s not saying that Messi would want to come.” Asked whether Liverpool’s bid undervalued Barry, O’Neill replied: “Absolutely, without question. This lad is playing for England.”General Charles Krulak, Lerner’s right-hand man, indicated on a supporters’ site that Villa would not seek to retain Barry if he was unhappy, although O’Neill rejected that suggestion. The Villa manager admitted Barry had told him he was “a bit affected by the speculation” in the wake of the weekend’s reports but claimed he had seen no evidence that the player was keen to leave. He also insisted that Lerner, and not Krulak, would be involved in the decision.”I think Randy thinks a lot of Gareth,” added O’Neill. “I spoke to him the other day and he wants to keep Gareth at the football club and try and improve the team rather than disassemble it. I think in many aspects he takes the positive side because, in effect, he shouldn’t really be surprised that the best teams are after the best players. But his view is that’s where we want to go, that was why he took the club over in the first place, to help restore the club.”Queens Park Rangers have entered the race to sign Robert Earnshaw, with the Championship club hopeful of bringing an end to the forward’s miserable spell at Pride Park, despite interest from Nottingham Forest. Earnshaw only started in seven Premier League matches at Derby.Another Derby striker, Kenny Miller, will also be leaving. The Scotland international, who joined from Celtic for £3m last August, is the highest-earning player at the club and cannot be retained in the Championship. Rangers, who sold Miller to Wolverhampton Wanderers in 2001, are poised to move for him. Share via Emailcenter_img Aston Villa Share via Email Martin O’Neill Wed 7 May 2008 22.32 EDT Stuart James Share on Messenger Aston Villa Reuse this content Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Liverpoollast_img read more

New Article – Ten Seldom Discussed FCPA Facts That You Need To

first_imgBloomberg BNA’s White Collar Crime Report recently published my article “Ten Seldom Discussed FCPA Facts That You Need To Know.”If you want to develop a sophisticated understanding of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and related topics, you should read the article.The article can be downloaded here and it begins as follows.“Much is written about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. However, amid the clutter of enforcement agency rhetoric and resolution documents not subjected to any meaningful judicial scrutiny as well as the mountains of FCPA Inc. marketing material touting the next compliance risk, there are certain FCPA facts that are seldom discussed.Yet such facts, covering the entire span of the FCPA (from the statute’s enactment, to its statutory provisions, to FCPA enforcement, to FCPA reform, to the FCPA industry itself) occasionally bear repeating.This article does that by highlighting ten seldom discussed FCPA facts that you need to know.”last_img read more

Book Review – The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act In A New Era

first_imgToday’s post is a book review by Professor Peter Reilly (Texas A&M University School of Law and author of several FCPA articles) of my book “The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act In A New Era.”  The review originally appeared in a recent volume of International Trade Law and Regulation.*****The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in a New Era, by law professor Mike Koehler, provides a fascinating and thorough analysis of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”).  But the book does far more than that; this volume attempts to educate readers in such a manner that they understand not only the motivation and thought processes behind the initial passage of the Act, but also the ongoing policy debates surrounding this important and controversial piece of legislation.While some books on the FCPA appear to target a particular audience, such as academics for example, this volume will prove useful to anyone, in whatever field, who wants to thoroughly understand the past, present, and future of the FCPA, whether that person is engaged in business, law, government, academia, public policy, or any other pursuit or profession.Professor Koehler’s insightful presentation and analysis of material on the FCPA likely comes from his unique background in the field.  Prior to academia, Koehler was an FCPA attorney in private practice where he advised clients on FCPA compliance matters, conducted FCPA investigations around the globe, and negotiated resolutions to FCPA enforcement actions with government agencies including the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.  Professor Koehler explains how his work in private practice led to an intense interest in “asking the why questions” regarding the FCPA and “injecting a candid and informed scholarly voice into the issues.”This, in turn, led to a career in academia with a near-singular focus on mastering the complex and fascinating topics surrounding the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws and initiatives.  In this capacity, Koehler has testified before the U.S. Congress on the FCPA, published articles on the topic in leading law reviews and journals, been cited in legal briefs, judicial decisions, policy papers, and Congressional testimony, and been a featured source in various national and international media.  In short, Professor Koehler has become one of the most knowledgeable and influential thinkers in the field, both domestically and internationally, and this volume represents the fruit of a number of years of thoughtful research, writing, and teaching on the subject.The depth and breadth of material covered in the book is ambitious, including the FCPA’s legislative history; enforcement agency policies and practices, including various alternative dispute resolution vehicles commonly used by enforcement agencies; FCPA legal authority, as well as administrative and other sources of guidance concerning the law; the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions, as well as its books and records and internal controls provisions; reasons for the increase in FCPA enforcement during the past decade; compliance and best practices information; and suggested FCPA reform measures.At the beginning of the book, Professor Koehler sets forth numerous questions, many of which could take an entire law review article to answer.   These questions include: (1) Who decides what bribery is? (2) Are business organizations that are subject to FCPA scrutiny ‘bad’ or ‘unethical’? (3) Is it still ‘bribery’ if the conduct in question was supported by the highest levels of the U.S. government? (4) If bribery is ‘bad,’ does that mean that all attempts to punish bribery and deter future misconduct are ‘good’? (5) Why has FCPA enforcement increased to the point that it is now a top legal and compliance concern for companies doing business in the global marketplace? (6) Has the quantity of FCPA enforcement actions become a higher priority for enforcement agencies than the quality of those actions? (7) Why does FCPA compliance remain difficult for even the most well-managed and well-intentioned companies? (8) Has this ‘new era’ of FCPA enforcement actually resulted in wasteful over compliance, with companies viewing every foreign business partner with irrational suspicion? (9) Is this ‘new era’ of FCPA enforcement—along with the ‘thriving and lucrative anti-bribery complex’ that has emerged simultaneously—desirable from a legal or policy perspective? (10) Has this ‘new era’ of FCPA enforcement been successful in actually reducing bribery?  And if not, could the FCPA be amended, or could certain enforcement agency policies and procedures be revised, in order to better achieve the original aims of the FCPA?The book addresses the issues surrounding these questions at a surprisingly detailed and in-depth level, especially with respect to those questions requiring answers that are more subtle and complex in nature.  The fact is there can be strong disagreement regarding the answers to many of these questions.  One of the more interesting aspects of studying the FCPA is to consider how much a person’s political or economic interests can influence his or her reasoning in answering the various questions posed by Koehler.  The key is that Professor Koehler, ever the law school teacher who is more fond of questioning, probing, and analyzing an issue than of trying to force feed his own conclusions in the matter, concentrates on building knowledge and skill-level within readers so they themselves can successfully grapple with the questions presented in the book, as well as their own questions involving the FCPA.Specifically, Professor Koehler relies on numerous vehicles and texts to build what he calls “FCPA goggles” for readers, enabling them to understand the FCPA to the extent necessary to make their own assessments of the strengths and weaknesses of the law, and to be able to pinpoint areas where the FCPA might be changed for improvement.  Readers are introduced to the FCPA’s statutory text, legislative history, judicial decisions, enforcement agency guidance, and various enforcement actions.  Koehler believes that analyzing these various authorities, and figuring out their impact upon how the FCPA is understood and enforced, are key aspects of providing readers with the knowledge they need to continue their own questioning, probing, and analyzing of this controversial law.  As Professor Koehler says to the reader, “[W]ith your FCPA goggles you now have a sharper focus to critically analyze various aspects of this new era, including whether the current FCPA and its enforcement best advance the laudable objectives of the FCPA.”It is these ‘FCPA goggles’ that allow readers to judge the two suggestions for reform put forth by Professor Koehler toward the end of the volume:  a compliance defense, as well as the abolition of Non-Prosecution and Deferred Prosecution Agreements (NPAs and DPAs) within the context of FCPA enforcement.  I will leave it to readers of the book to determine for themselves, through their own ‘FCPA goggles,’ whether Koehler has made a strong case for either suggested reform measure.  I will say, however, that Professor Koehler seems to be aware that he has well-equipped readers to subject his ideas to deep and knowledgeable scrutiny based upon what he has taught them to that point in the book.  With that in mind, Koehler has to carefully explain why, for example, a compliance defense is neither a new nor novel idea; how in some respects the Department of Justice already recognizes a ‘de facto’ compliance defense; how numerous former high-ranking government officials support such a defense; and which important policy objectives would be advanced through an FCPA compliance defense.  Koehler builds and bolsters his argument by relying upon various testimony and legal and policy authority.  It almost feels like an academic ‘capstone’ exercise for the book, where the Professor puts forth his arguments and then turns to the reader/student and asks, “Have I done what I set out to do in this project?  Are you now able to thoroughly question, analyze, and criticize my arguments based upon what you have learned through this book?”The answer is unequivocally yes; and the contribution this new volume makes to the field is unequivocally substantial.*****For additional reviews of the book, see here.To order a hard copy of the book, see here and here; to order an e-copy of the book, see here and here.last_img read more

Unable To File Its Annual Report Due In Large Part To An

first_imgWorld Acceptance Corporation is a South Carolina based consumer finance company operating in 15 U.S. states and Mexico. It is also the parent company of ParaData Financial Systems, a provider of computer software solutions for the consumer finance industry.Since late April, its stock price has been on a tear.That ended yesterday as the company’s stock price fell approximately 12.4% upon disclosing that it would be unable to file its annual report due in large part to a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act investigation.In pertinent part, the company’s disclosure states:“The Company is conducting an internal investigation of its operations in Mexico, focusing on the legality under the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and certain local laws of certain payments related to loans, the maintenance of the Company’s books and records associated with such payments, and the treatment of compensation matters for certain employees. Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP, the Company’s outside legal counsel, and Ernst & Young LLP have been retained to lead the investigation.The Company commissioned the internal investigation in March 2017 after its independent registered public accounting firm received an anonymous letter regarding compliance matters, which letter was then forwarded to the Audit Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors. The Audit Committee reviewed and considered the complaint, and the Company promptly commenced its investigation.The Company has voluntarily contacted the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice to advise both agencies that an internal investigation is underway and that the Company intends to cooperate with both agencies. A conclusion cannot be drawn at this time as to whether either agency will open a proceeding to investigate this matter, or, if a proceeding is opened, what potential remedies these agencies may seek. In addition, although management will seek to avoid disruption to its operations in Mexico, the Company cannot determine at this time the ultimate effect that the investigation or any remedial measures will have on such operations.As a result of the ongoing investigation, the Company is currently unable to file the Form 10-K until more information becomes available pursuant to the investigation, including for purposes of evaluating the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. The Company expects to file the Form 10-K by June 29, 2017 …”.It is virtually guaranteed that plaintiff shareholder law firms will begin to launch “investigations” and that securities fraud class actions will be filed shortly. [Update: sure enough about those “investigations” – see here, here and here].Yet another example of “FCPA Ripples” (see here for the article) and further to the notion that settlement amounts in an actual FCPA enforcement action are often only a relatively minor component of the overall financial consequences that can result from FCPA scrutiny or enforcement. FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. Learn More & Registerlast_img read more

Skin cream containing rapamycin reduces TSCrelated facial tumors

first_img Source:https://www.uth.edu/media/story.htm?id=37af25df-14a2-4c5e-b1ee-ac9585946aa0 May 23 2018Addressing a critical issue for people with a genetic disorder called tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), doctors at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) reported that a skin cream containing rapamycin significantly reduced the disfiguring facial tumors affecting more than 90 percent of people with the condition.Findings of the multicenter, international study involving 179 people with tuberous sclerosis complex appear in the journal JAMA Dermatology.”People with tuberous sclerosis complex want to look like everyone else,” said Mary Kay Koenig, M.D., the study’s lead author, co-director of the Tuberous Sclerosis Center of Excellence and holder of the Endowed Chair of Mitochondrial Medicine at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth. “And, they can with this treatment.”Tuberous sclerosis complex affects about 50,000 people in the United States and is characterized by the uncontrolled growth of non-cancerous tumors throughout the body.While benign tumors in the kidney, brain and other organs pose the greater health risk, the tumors on the face produce a greater impact on a patient’s daily life by making them look different from everyone else, Koenig said.Koenig’s team tested two compositions of facial cream containing rapamycin and a third with no rapamycin. Patients applied the cream at bedtime for six months.”Eighty percent of patients getting the study drug experienced a significant improvement compared to 25 percent of those getting the mixture with no rapamycin,” she said.”Angiofibromas on the face can be disfiguring, they can bleed and they can negatively impact quality of life for individuals with TSC,” said Kari Luther Rosbeck, president and CEO of the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance.”Previous treatments, including laser surgery, have painful after effects. This pivotal study and publication are a huge step toward understanding the effectiveness of topical rapamycin as a treatment option. Further, it is funded by the TSC Research Program at the Department of Defense. We are so proud of this research,” Rosbeck said.Rapamycin is typically given to patients undergoing an organ transplant. When administered by mouth, rapamycin suppresses the immune system to make sure the organ is not rejected.Related StoriesEndogenous retrovirus type W found to be a major contributor to nerve damage in MSObesity linked with greater symptomatic severity of multiple sclerosisHigh levels of blood lipids may worsen multiple sclerosis symptoms in obese patientsRapamycin and tuberous sclerosis complex are linked by a protein called mTOR. When it malfunctions, tuberous sclerosis complex occurs. Rapamycin corrects this malfunction.Rapamycin was initially used successfully to treat brain tumors caused by tuberous sclerosis complex, so researchers decided to try it on TSC-related facial tumors. Building on a 2010 pilot study on the use of rapamycin to treat TSC-related facial tumors, this study confirmed that a cream containing rapamycin shrinks these tumors.As the drug’s toxicity is a concern when taken by mouth, researchers were careful to check for problems tied to its use on the skin. “It looks like the medication stays on the surface of the skin. We didn’t see any appreciable levels in the bloodstreams of those participating in the study,” Koenig said.The Topical Rapamycin to Erase Angiofibromas in TSC – Multicenter Evaluation of Novel Therapy or TREATMENT trial involved 10 test sites including one in Australia.Koenig said additional studies are needed to gauge the long-term impact of the drug, the optimal dosage and whether the facial cream should be a combined with an oral treatment.Koenig’s coauthors include Adelaide Hebert, M.D.; Joshua Samuels, M.D., M.P.H.; John Slopis, M.D.; Cynthia S. Bell; Joan Roberson, R.N.; Patti Tate; and Hope Northrup, M.D. All are from McGovern Medical School at UTHealth with the exception of Slopis, who is with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Hebert is also on the faculty of the MD Anderson Cancer Center and Northrup on the faculty of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. The study was supported in part by the United States Department of Defense grant DOD TSCRP CDMRP W81XWH-11-1-0240 and by the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance of Australia.”The face is our window to the world and when you look different from everyone else, it impacts your confidence and your ability to interact with others. This treatment will help those with TSC become more like everyone else,” Koenig said.last_img read more

Study 70000 opioidrelated deaths not reported owing to incomplete death certificates

first_imgJun 27 2018Several states are likely dramatically underestimating the effect of opioid-related deaths because of incomplete death certificate reporting, with Pennsylvania leading the pack, according to a new analysis by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.The study, published today in Public Health Reports, the journal of the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General, found that potentially 70,000 opioid-related overdose deaths were not included in national opioid-related mortality estimates since 1999 because coroners and medical examiners did not specify the drug that contributed to the cause of death when completing the death certificates.”Proper allocation of resources for the opioid epidemic depends on understanding the magnitude of the problem,” said lead author Jeanine M. Buchanich, Ph.D., research associate professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Biostatistics. “Incomplete death certificate reporting hampers the efforts of lawmakers, treatment specialists and public health officials. And the large differences we found between states in the completeness of opioid-related overdose mortality reporting makes it more difficult to identify geographic regions most at risk.”In the U.S., cause of death codes are assigned by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) using information reported by the coroner or medical examiner completing the death certificate. Drug-specific overdose deaths are identified by the contributory causes of death, which are categorized as “T codes” and are assigned based on the specific drugs recorded by the coroner or medical examiner completing the death certificate. A code of T50.9 means “other and unspecified drugs, medicaments and biological substances.”Buchanich and her team extracted death data by state for 1999 through 2015 from the NCHS’s Mortality Multiple Cause Micro-data Files. They grouped overdose deaths into opioid-related, non-opioid-related and unspecified codes, and calculated the change in percentage of overdose deaths that fell into each category from 1999 to 2015 by state. This allowed the researchers to extrapolate how many of the unspecified overdose deaths were likely opioid-related.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysIn those 17 years, opioid-related overdose deaths rose 401 percent, non-opioid-related overdose deaths rose 150 percent and unspecified overdose deaths rose 220 percent. In five states – Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi and Pennsylvania – more than 35 percent of the overdose deaths were coded as unspecified.The variability among states not reporting specific drugs during this time period was tremendous – ranging from fewer than 10 unspecified overdose deaths in Vermont to 11,152 in Pennsylvania. States with a decentralized county coroner system or with a hybrid system that involved county coroners and state medical examiners, were likely to have a higher proportion of overdose deaths with unspecified drug codes.”Multiple organizations have advocated for more accurate drug reporting on death certificates,” said Buchanich. “But coroners are less likely to be physicians and do not necessarily have medical training useful for completing drug information for death certificates based on toxicology reports. And states with a decentralized or hybrid system are likely to have less standardization, leading to greater variation in reporting accuracy.”Several states have made extensive efforts to improve reporting. In Kentucky, for example, opioid-related drug codes increased 43 percent from 1999 through 2015, and unspecified drug reporting decreased 28 percent. This suggests that state-based efforts can be instrumental in improving the accuracy of drug-specific reporting for overdose deaths, Buchanich said.Several assumptions – primarily that the proportion of known opioid-related deaths would be the same for those that were unspecified by state by year – were made in performing this analysis, Buchanich said. Future research should more fully evaluate these assumptions and also examine other factors, such as potential biases, that could lead coroners and medical examiners to use an unspecified versus specific drug code on death certificates. Source:http://www.upmc.com/media/NewsReleases/2018/Pages/buchanich-death-certs.aspxlast_img read more

Study compares outpatient antibiotic prescribing with traditional medical retail clinic settings

first_imgJul 17 2018Bottom Line: Outpatient antibiotic prescribing varied among traditional medical and retail clinic settings and during visits with respiratory diagnoses where antibiotics were inappropriate, patterns that suggest differences in patient mix and antibiotic overuse.Why The Research Is Interesting: Antibiotic use contributes to antibiotic resistance, and antibiotic overuse is common, especially for viral respiratory infections. This study compared antibiotic prescribing patterns among urgent care centers, retail clinics, emergency departments and medical offices.Related StoriesCannabis ingredient shows promise as potential antibiotic for superbugsMultifaceted intervention for acute respiratory infection improves antibiotic-prescribingStudy: Surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be core focus for healthcare facilitiesWho and When: Outpatient claims data from a 2014 database that captures claims data on people younger than 65 with employer-sponsored insuranceWhat (Measures and Outcomes): Outpatient claims at urgent care centers, retail clinics, hospital based-emergency departments or medical offices were each assigned a diagnosis (exposure); percentage of visits linked to prescription of antibiotics with a focus on respiratory diagnoses where antibiotics were unnecessary (outcomes)How (Study Design): This was an observational study. Researchers were not intervening for purposes of the study and cannot control all the natural differences that could explain the study findings.Authors: Katherine E. Fleming-Dutra, M.D., of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, and coauthorsStudy Limitations: Researchers could not clinically validate diagnoses in claims data so misclassification was possible, data also are not generalizable to populations not captured in this claims database, and facility codes could not be validated.Study Conclusions: Antibiotic stewardship, the effort to optimize antibiotic use, across the spectrum of outpatient settings could help to improve antibiotic prescribing and patient care. Source:https://media.jamanetwork.com/news-item/comparison-of-outpatient-antibiotic-prescribing-in-traditional-medical-retail-clinic-settings/last_img read more

New personalized cellular therapy approved for use in the European Union

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Aug 27 2018The European Commission (EC) has approved a personalized cellular therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, making it the first chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy permitted for use in the European Union in two distinct indications. The EC granted the approval today to Novartis for Kymriah® (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) for the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in pediatric and young adult patients up to 25 years of age, as well as relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in patients over 18. The decision follows approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Kymriah in B-cell ALL and DLBCL in the United States.”This is another milestone in the fight against cancer, allowing patients across the European Union to benefit from these potentially lifesaving therapies,” said Carl June, MD, the Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy in the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies in Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center. “This approval demonstrates the global impact of the therapies we developed in Philadelphia, and the far-reaching potential of these therapies to change the way cancer is treated across the world.”Investigators at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine led research, development, and clinical trials of CAR T therapy in collaboration with Novartis and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). In August 2017, Kymriah became the first therapy based on gene transfer ever approved by the FDA when it was authorized for children and young adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell ALL. Approval for relapsed or refractory DLBCL followed in May 2018.The treatment modifies patients’ own immune T cells, which are collected and reprogrammed at the Novartis manufacturing facility to potentially seek and destroy the patients’ cancer cells. Once they are infused back into patients’ bodies, these newly built cells both multiply and attack, targeting cells that express a protein called CD19. Tests reveal the army of hunter cells can grow to more than 10,000 new cells for each single engineered cell patients receive – producing durable remission rates in refractory ALL and DLBCL – and can survive in the body for years.The approval in the EU is the latest accomplishment in the alliance between Penn and Novartis, which entered into a global collaboration in 2012 to further research, develop, and commercialize Kymriah and other CAR T-cell therapies for the treatment of cancers. Specifically, the action of the European Commission is based on two global CAR T cell trials.Related StoriesNANOLIVE‘s novel CX-A defines a new standard for live cell imaging in 96 well plates for continuous organelle monitoring in cell populationsSlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’The first global trial, known as ELIANA, evaluated patients in 25 centers in the US, Canada, Australia, Japan, and in Europe in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Norway and Spain. The trial involved 75 children and young adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell ALL and showed 81 percent of patients achieved a complete remission at three months follow up, with 80 percent of responders still in remission at six months. Overall survival at six months was 90 percent.The second trial, called JULIET, is the largest study examining CAR T therapy in DLBCL, enrolling patients from 27 sites in 10 countries across the US, Canada, Australia, Japan, and Europe in Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Norway and the Netherlands. The trial showed an overall response of 52 percent, with 40 percent of patients achieving a complete response, among the 93 infused patients with three or more months of follow-up or earlier discontinuation.Many patients in both trials experienced a side effect called cytokine release syndrome (CRS). CRS is a toxicity associated with CAR T therapy, which includes varying degrees of flu-like symptoms, with fevers, nausea, and muscle pain, and can require ICU-level care. In the ELIANA trial, 47 percent of patients experienced grade 3 or grade 4 CRS. In the JULIET trial, the number was 22 percent, using a CRS grading scale developed at the University of Pennsylvania. Patients with severe CRS required treatment with tocilizumab, a therapy initially implemented at Penn and CHOP, and now FDA-approved for CAR T cell-induced severe or life-threatening CRS, or corticosteroids. All of those patients recovered from their CRS. Other toxicities included infections, cytopenias or low blood count, neurologic events such as confusion, febrile neutropenia, and a metabolic abnormality called tumor lysis syndrome. All of those issues resolved on their own or with treatment, and there were no treatment-related deaths.Novartis is working to create a registry to follow patients for 15 years after being treated to monitor their progress and any potential, future side effects.The Novartis-Penn Center for Advanced Cellular Therapeutics (CACT) opened in 2016 and hosted Vice President Joe Biden at the launch of his Cancer Moonshot initiative, cementing Penn’s role as international innovator in the development and manufacturing of personalized cellular therapies.Patients who are interested in T-cell therapies at Penn Medicine can call 215-316-5127 for more information. Source:https://www.pennmedicine.org/news/news-releases/2018/august/car-t-cell-therapy-receives-approval-for-use-across-european-unionlast_img read more

Years after shutting down US atom smasher reveals properties of God particle

first_imgIn a scientific ghost story, a U.S. atom smasher has made an important scientific contribution 3.5 years after it shut down. Scientists are reporting that the Tevatron collider in Batavia, Illinois, has provided new details about the nature of the famed Higgs boson—the particle that’s key to physicists’ explanation of how other fundamental particles get their mass and the piece in a theory called the standard model. The new result bolsters the case that the Higgs, which was discovered at a different atom smasher, exactly fits the standard model predictions.“This is a very interesting and important paper, because it’s a different mechanism” for probing the Higgs’s properties, says John Ellis, a theorist at King’s College London and CERN who was not involved in the work. “This is the swan song” for the Tevatron, he says.The Tevatron, a 7-kilometer-long ring-shaped collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, ran from 1983 until September 2011. It saw hints of the Higgs boson but never actually discovered the particle. That honor went to physicists working at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 27-kilometer-long atom smasher at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. They announced their discovery in July 2012. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) As soon as physicists at the LHC discovered the Higgs, they nailed down its mass: 125 giga-electron volts, or roughly 133 times the mass of the proton. But the particle has other characteristic properties, too. Like all fundamental particles, the Higgs has a fixed and quantized amount of angular momentum or spin. It also has a property of symmetry called parity, which can be either even or odd and which affects, for example, the way the Higgs can decay into other particles. According to the standard model, the Higgs should have zero spin and positive parity. However, it’s conceivable that the observed particle could have zero spin and negative parity or two units of spin and positive parity. Many physicists would be thrilled if the Higgs had such exotic “spin-parity,” as it would point to new phenomena not predicted by the standard model.In fact, experimenters working with the two biggest particle detectors fed by the LHC—massive devices called ATLAS and CMS—have already shown with high certainty that the Higgs boson has zero spin and even parity. To do that, they studied the decay of the Higgs into familiar particles, such as a pair of photons or a pair of massive particles called Z bosons. From the angular distributions of those emerging daughter particles, physicists were able to determine the spin and parity of the parent Higgs.Researchers working with the Tevatron data took a different tack. Instead of studying the decays of the Higgses, they looked for signs of a Higgs produced in tandem with a Z boson or a W boson, particles that convey the weak nuclear force, as they explain in a paper in press at Physical Review Letters. (The Higgs was assumed to decay into a pair of particles known as a bottom quark and an antibottom quark.) From the energies and momenta of the Higgs and its partner, researchers then calculated a quantity called the invariant mass for the pair. Were the Higgs and the partner born from the decay of a single parent particle, this quantity would be the mass of that parent. In actuality, the Higgs and its partner would emerge directly from the chaos of the particle collision, so the parent particle is purely hypothetical.Nevertheless, by calculating the mass of that hypothetical parent particle, researchers were able to test for different combinations of spin and parity by proxy. If the Higgs had “exotic” spin-parity rather than the standard model characteristics, the observed invariant mass would be higher. So researchers working with the two particle detectors fed by the Tevatron—CDF and D0—searched for such high-invariant mass pairs. Finding none, they ruled out even more stringently exotic versions of the Higgs. So even though Tevatron physicists never conclusively observed the Higgs boson, they were able to put limits on its properties.Technically, the new Tevatron limits are slightly stronger than the limits set by the LHC experiments, says Dmitri Denisov, a physicist at Fermilab who works on D0. But CERN’s Ellis says that ATLAS and CMS had already essentially settled the matter.In fact, Tevatron researchers missed an opportunity to scoop their LHC counterparts on the spin and parity of the Higgs, Ellis says. Just weeks after researchers at the LHC had discovered the Higgs, Ellis and colleagues explained in a paper how the Tevatron teams might apply the invariant-mass technique to their archived data to take the “fast track” to testing the Higgs’s spin and parity. For technical reasons, the technique would be more sensitive on Tevatron data than on LHC data, they explained, because the Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons, whereas the LHC collided protons and protons. But in the end, the Tevatron analysis proceeded slowly, as CDF and D0 team members left to work on the LHC. “This result has somewhat of an ‘us too’ character rather than being first as we’d hoped,” Ellis says.Denisov agrees that lack of people impeded progress. He notes that the whole idea could have been tried even before the Higgs was found: “If [Ellis] had come to us a year before we might have been able to determine the spin and parity of the Higgs even before it was discovered.”For Higgs studies at the Tevatron, “this is basically it,” Denisov says. In the meantime, physicists working at the LHC are aiming to probe other properties of the Higgs with higher precision. In particular, they hope to measure to within a few percentage points how quickly the Higgs decays into different combinations of more-familiar particles and compare that with standard model predictions. Researchers say that work should take about 15 years.last_img read more

Heres how much climate change is going to cost your county

first_imgHere’s how much climate change is going to cost your county By Paul VoosenJun. 29, 2017 , 2:00 PM Economists give the problems caused by climate change an appropriately dismal name: the damage function. To project just how much damage each U.S. county will incur by century’s end, researchers ran 29,000 simulations of the U.S. economy, with results informed by weather-driven damages they detected in six domains–agriculture, crime, health, energy demand, labor, and coastal communities—between 1981 and 2010. Heat, for example, may increase crime or cause corn yields to fall, but it also could lower fatalities driven by exposure to the cold. The resulting prediction, though quite fallible in its inability to predict how humans will adapt to warming, foresees a country where, if fossil fuels continue to pour carbon into the atmosphere, the United States will divide further into a country of haves and have nots. Not surprisingly, Atlantic coastal communities are projected to take a toll from rising seas and strengthening hurricanes, but also much of the South and Midwest will be hurt by a decline in farming caused by rising temperatures, along with increasing energy demands to keep up with the heat. Meanwhile, states in the north and northwest could see their fortunes mildly boosted by warming, with farming yields rising thanks to shorter winters and less need to ward off harsh cold in homes. That’s not enough to counteract an overall negative trend for the country, which, if the planet warmed by 6°C from preindustrial levels, could suffer damage worth 6% of its gross domestic product, the team reports today in Science. The results, shown in the above map (red means total economic damage and blue is total economic benefit; projections are for 2080-2100), could guide states and the federal government toward the communities most in need of help adapting to the changed climate—should lawmakers choose to act.last_img read more

Scientific societies worry Plan S will make them shutter journals slash services

first_imgScientific publishing needs “a radical program” to promote full and immediate open access because progress has been too slow, argues Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission’s open-access envoy in Brussels, who is one of the architects of Plan S. The open-access movement began about 15 years ago, but by 2016, only about 20% of newly published research articles were open access.Plan S’s requirements will disproportionately hurt the selective journals that many societies publish, says Fred Dylla, former executive director of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) in College Park, Maryland, who still advises AIP about its journals. Such journals typically have high costs per article, reflecting expenses for reviewing papers that are rejected; publishers worry Plan S’s fee cap, which has yet to be set, will be too low to cover the average cost per paper. What’s more, the societies typically have lower profit margins and a smaller economy of scale than do the commercial publishers that publish the majority of all journal articles. The largest, Elsevier, based in Amsterdam, publishes more than 2500 journal titles; scientific societies each publish at most a few dozen. (Science is published by a nonprofit scientific society, AAAS in Washington, D.C.; Science’s news section is editorially independent of the journal and AAAS.)Comprehensive data aren’t available, but a 2017 study by Universities UK, an advocacy group in London, estimated that for life science societies, publishing income funded about 40% of spending on other activities, whereas for physical science societies, the figure was closer to 20%. GSA’s two journals provide about 65% of the society’s total net revenues, financing other GSA programs that don’t make money. These include efforts to advocate for science funding and help early-career scientists, activities that could help researchers outside of the society’s members.So far, 16 funders, most of them in Europe, have embraced Plan S, not enough to transform journal finances. U.S. government funders remain cool to the approach. But Plan S’s international momentum grew—along with the threat it poses to traditional publishing—in December 2018, when officials in China backed its open-access goals. If China follows through, Plan S could reduce publishers’ income by perhaps 15% under certain conditions, according to an estimate published last week by Delta Think, a consulting firm in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. That analysis doesn’t include the effect of the cap on author fees (also called article-processing charges), which could cut revenues further. The average fee for papers published in purely open-access journals in 2018 was about $1600, Delta Think has estimated.GSA produces such a journal, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, and is “actively preparing for an eventual open-access publishing landscape” for all articles, DePellegrin says. GSA’s other journal, Genetics, is hybrid. The society has already reduced costs. The revenue loss from global adoption of Plan S would force GSA to cut its services or sell the journals to a commercial publisher, she says. “The trade-offs are hard,” adds Mark Johnston, editor-in-chief of Genetics and a molecular geneticist at the University of Colorado in Denver.One way society publishers could adapt to Plan S’s requirements: Publish more papers to bring in more author fees. But that strategy may not succeed. The PLOS family of open-access journals, which published nearly 25,000 papers in 2017, reported a $1.7 million operating loss that year. Another prominent open-access journal, eLife, charges a publication fee of $2500 but relies on subsidies from the Wellcome Trust, a medical charity in London, and other funders to break even.Besides, increasing the volume of papers inevitably decreases selectivity and lowers quality, some publishers say. “We and other societies are worried about where [Plan S] puts incentives,” said Brooks Hanson, an executive vice president who oversees publishing at the American Geophysical Union in Washington, D.C., which produces 20 journals, five of them purely open access. “It actually incentivizes publishers to go after more and more papers.”Science’s publisher, Bill Moran, says the journal doesn’t want to pursue what he calls “a volume play.” He wants Plan S to carve out an exemption for Science and similar selective journals that reflects their unusual circumstances and roles in scholarly communications. Science accepts only about 7% of manuscripts submitted and publishes, in addition, a variety of news, perspectives, and other nonresearch articles. The journal wouldn’t be sustainable if author fees had to cover all publication costs, Moran says.”Science is unique,” Moran says. “Not all journals are the same. If your goal is to maintain quality, there has to be an exception” to a one-size-fits-all approach like Plan S.Still, if more funders demanded solely open-access publication, Science might have to make adjustments, he adds. An option might be to charge subscription fees only for nonresearch content, he says.Smits places the onus on journals and societies to create new business models to adjust to Plan S’s requirements. But the Plan S funders also want to cooperate with societies to move away from subscriptions while maintaining quality. “We are very much interested in having an [author fee] that is fair enough to allow many organizations to flip their journals” to open access, he says.The Wellcome Trust, one of the Plan S funders, and other groups have said they will publish a report by July on strategies and business models through which scholarly societies in the United Kingdom could make that transition. In addition, Smits met this month with representatives of the Royal Society, based in London, and 10 other midsize scientific societies to discuss how Plan S funders could help them switch. He says the societies are “keen to make the transition. They identified, however, a number of challenges.”*Correction, 6 February, 4 p.m.: This article has been updated to reflect that eLife used subsidies from funders to fully cover its operating loss in 2017. Davide Bonazzi/@SalzmanArt By Jeffrey BrainardJan. 23, 2019 , 12:05 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe An existential threat. That’s what scientific societies supported by journal subscriptions call Plan S. Introduced in September 2018 by European research funders and endorsed by others since then, the plan will require that grantees’ papers be immediately available free of charge. All publishers that charge subscriptions will be affected, but scientific societies fear they could be hit especially hard. One, the Genetics Society of America (GSA) in Rockville, Maryland, predicts worldwide adoption of Plan S could cut its net revenue from publishing by a third. Less drastic impacts on societies’ bottom lines might still force them to sell their journals to commercial publishers and cut back on activities supported by publishing, such as professional training and public outreach.”We’re not seeing a sustainable, viable, nonprofit open-access model” if all funders back Plan S, says Tracey DePellegrin, executive director of GSA, which publishes two journals.After accepting comments through 8 February, the plan’s architects expect to firm up details this spring. But the bottom line is clear: By 2024, Plan S funders will allow grantees to publish papers only on platforms that offer immediate open access and cap the fee that open-access publishers can charge a paper’s authors. Many journals now follow a hybrid model, publishing individual papers open access for a fee but deriving most of their income from subscriptions. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Scientific societies worry Plan S will make them shutter journals, slash serviceslast_img read more

Pope Francis urges Hungarians Romanians to put troubles behind them

first_imgThis has often caused friction between the two European Union neighbours with tensions flaring occasionally over the public use of ethnic minority flags.Pope Francis, Pope Francis Romania, Romania Pope Francis , Romania Hungary, Vatican news, Indian Express People attend a mass led by Pope Francis at the Marian Shrine in Sumuleu Ciuc, Miercurea Ciuc, Romania June 1, 2019. (Inquam Photos/Octav Ganea via REUTERS)In his homily to the rain-soaked crowd, which included Hungarian President Janos Ader, the pope suggested past troubles should not be a barrier to co-existence.“Complicated and sorrow-filled situations from the past must not be forgotten or denied, yet neither must they be an obstacle or an excuse standing in the way of our desire to live together as brothers and sisters,” he said.In his homily, Francis said God wanted “that we not let ourselves be robbed of our fraternal love by those voices and hurts that provoke division andfragmentation.” Taking stock of monsoon rain Amid sex abuse scandals, Vatican upholds confession secrecy A clash of worldviews as Pope Francis and Vladimir Putin meet again P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies By Reuters | Published: June 1, 2019 4:02:48 pm Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Advertising Pope Francis, Pope Francis Romania, Romania Pope Francis , Romania Hungary, Vatican news, Indian Express Pope Francis participates in a joint prayer at the Romanian Orthodox “People’s Salvation” Cathedral in Bucharest, Romania, May 31, 2019. (Reuters)Pope Francis urged ethnic Hungarians and Romanians to put their troubled past behind them on Saturday as bad weather disrupted his visit to Transylvania, forcing him to be driven for hours on winding mountain roads. Transylvania, which was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until the end of the First World War, has a large ethnic Hungarian population and there have been tensions sometimes between ethnic Hungarians and Romanians.Ethnic Hungarians, many of whom are Catholic in a predominantly Orthodox Christian nation, are the largest minority in Romania, around six per cent of the population. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban has visited Transylvania many times privately to meet local Hungarian leaders and outline his policy views.In 2015, Romania rebuked him for posting on his Facebook page symbols it said suggested Budapest favours autonomy for Romanian territory populated mainly by ethnic Hungarians, calling such “revisionism” unacceptable.center_img Best Of Express Related News Pope Francis, Pope Francis Romania, Romania Pope Francis , Romania Hungary, Vatican news, Indian Express Pope Francis arrives at the Marian Shrine in Sumuleu Ciuc, Miercurea Ciuc, Romania June 1, 2019. (Reuters)Francis was to have flown by plane from Bucharest to the city of Bacau and then by helicopter to the Sumuleu-Ciuc shrine in this town nestled in the mountains.But thunderstorms, low clouds and rain forced him to fly to the city of Targu Mures, on the other side of the Carpathian mountains, and be driven for to the site.From there, Francis was due to continue by helicopter to the city of Iasi to visit Catholics in the remote region of Moldova, close to the border with the former Soviet Union’s satellite Republic of Moldova.But Vatican officials said he would drive back to Targu Mures and fly by plane to Iasi before returning to Bucharest. More than 80,000 people gathered on muddy slopes around one of Romania’s most popular Catholic shrines to see the pope on the second day of his trip to the country. A clash of worldviews as Pope Francis and Putin meet again More Explained Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Huge Hong Kong protest expected in last push to scrap extradition bill

first_img Related News The city’s independent legal system was guaranteed under laws governing Hong Kong’s return from British to Chinese rule 22 years ago, and is seen by the financial hub’s business and diplomatic communities as its strong remaining asset amid encroachments from Beijing.Hong Kong, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong extradition law, extradition law Hong Kong, Hong Kong news, Indian Express, latest news Hong Kong: Students in chains march to protest against the extradition bill in Hong Kong, Saturday, June 8, 2019. (AP)Concerns have spread from the city’s democratic and human rights groups to secondary school students, church groups and media lobbies as well as corporate lawyers and pro-establishment business figures, some usually loathe to contradict the government.Veteran Democratic Party lawmaker James told Reuters that he believed a big turnout on Sunday could finally sway Hong Kong’s embattled government.“It could really force a severe re-think by the government,” he said. A committee of pro-democratic groups has raised turnout estimates and are now eyeing the biggest single-day rally since 2003, when a similar number of protesters forced the government to shelve tighter national security laws.The march will end at the city’s Legislative Council, where debates start on Wednesday into sweeping amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance. The extradition bill is due to be passed by the end of the month.After weeks of growing local and international pressure, the protest is expected to reflect the broad range of opposition to the bill, with many saying they simply cannot trust China’s court system or its security apparatus. Hong Kong protesters, police clash as demonstrations target Chinese traders Hong Kong, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong extradition law, extradition law Hong Kong, Hong Kong news, Indian Express, latest news Students chain up themselves as they protest to demand authorities to scrap a proposed extradition bill with China, in Hong Kong, China June 8, 2019. (Reuters)At least half a million people in Hong Kong are expected to brave sweltering heat on Sunday to press the government to scrap a proposed extradition law that would allow suspects to be sent to China to face trial, organizers of the march said. By Reuters |Hong Kong | Published: June 8, 2019 8:00:19 pm Best Of Express Some senior judges have expressed deep-set fears over the changes, however.The march will cap an intense political week for the city, with an estimated 180,000 people holding a candle-lit vigil on Tuesday to mark 30 years since the Tiananmen Square crackdown and a rare rally by the city’s lawyers on Thursday.It follows an earlier protest by more than 100,000 people in late May.Commercial lawyer and commentator Kevin Yam said he expected many people who attended the recent rallies would turn out on Sunday.He said it was the first time since the handover that the government had ignored both the concerns of the international community and the local business community at the same time.US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his British and German counterparts have spoken against the bill, while 11 European Union envoys met Carrie Lam to formally protest. P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Advertising More Explained Hong Kong tourism, hotel occupancy falls as protests drag on LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Post Comment(s) “There is everything to play for…People really sense this is a turning point for Hong Kong.”That concern has mounted despite extensive efforts by Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam and her senior officials, both in public and private, to insist that adequate safeguards are in place to ensure that anyone facing political and religious persecution or torture would not be extradited.Hong Kong, Hong Kong protest, Hong Kong extradition law, extradition law Hong Kong, Hong Kong news, Indian Express, latest news Thousand of legal professionals wearing black, stage a silent protest to the Central Government Offices, demanding authorities scrap a proposed extradition bill with China, in Hong Kong, China June 6, 2019. (Reuters)Similarly, anyone facing a death penalty would not be extradited, but legislative oversight of extradition arrangements has been removed under the bill.While the chief executive has to sign off on any extradition, court hearings and appeals must first be exhausted and the government has insisted judges will play a key “gatekeeper” role. Advertising Taking stock of monsoon rain Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Advertising Clashes break out as Hong Kong protesters escalate fight in suburbs “This is beyond a question of politics at this point, it is about not doing something stupid,” Yam said.last_img read more

Hong Kong protesters run riot in legislature smashing up doors and walls

first_imgBy Reuters |Hong Kong | Published: July 1, 2019 7:16:40 pm It did not say what would happen if they didn’t. Police did not immediately intervene.hong kong protests, hong kong protesters, hong kong extradition bill, hong kong extradition bill protests, carrie lam, world news, Indian Express Protesters break into the Legislative Council building during the anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover to China in Hong Kong. (Reuters)Riot police in helmets and carrying batons fired pepper spray as the standoff continued into the sweltering heat of the evening. Some demonstrators removed steel bars that were reinforcing parts of the council building.Banners hanging over flyovers at the protest site read: “Free Hong Kong.”The protesters, some with cling film wrapped around their arms to protect their skin in the event of tear gas, once again paralysed parts of the Asian financial hub as they occupied roads after blocking them off with metal barriers. Best Of Express Advertising Advertising Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Some carried road signs, others corrugated iron sheets and pieces of scaffolding upstairs and downstairs as about a thousand gathered around the Legislative Council building in the heart of the former British colony’s financial district.A small group of mostly students wearing hard hats and masks had used a metal trolley, poles and scaffolding to charge again and again at the compound’s reinforced glass doors, which finally gave.The council, the mini-parliament, issued a red alert, ordering the protesters to leave immediately. Clashes break out as Hong Kong protesters escalate fight in suburbs Beyond the public outcry, the extradition bill has spooked some of Hong Kong’s tycoons into starting to move their personal wealth offshore, according to financial advisers, bankers and lawyers familiar with the details. hong kong protests, hong kong protesters, hong kong extradition bill, hong kong extradition bill protests, carrie lam, world news, Indian Express Some carried road signs, others corrugated iron sheets and pieces of scaffolding upstairs and downstairs as about a thousand gathered around the Legislative Council building. (Reuters)Hong Kong protesters ran riot in the legislature building on the 22nd anniversary of the city’s 1997 return to Chinese rule on Monday, smashing up paintings, doors and walls amid widespread anger over proposed laws that would allow extraditions to China. Hong Kong leader seeks meeting with students after mass protests Related News Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam suspended the bill on June 15 after some of the largest and most violent protests in the city in decades, but stopped short of protesters’ demands to scrap it.The Beijing-backed leader is now clinging on to her job at a time of an unprecedented backlash against the government that poses the greatest popular challenge to Chinese leader Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.“The kind of deafness that I see in the government this time around despite these protests is really worrying. The complete disregard for the will of the people is what alarms me,” said Steve, a British lawyer show has worked in Hong Kong for 30 years.“If this bill is not completely scrapped, I will have no choice but to leave my home, Hong Kong.” Opponents of Hong Kong extradition law plan another protest hong kong protests, hong kong protesters, hong kong extradition bill, hong kong extradition bill protests, carrie lam, world news, Indian Express Hong Kong Police officers spray pepper spray as protesters use a cart to ram into the glass wall of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong. (AP)Opponents of the extradition bill, which would allow people to be sent to mainland China for trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party, fear it is a threat to Hong Kong’s much-cherished rule of law and are demanding it be scrapped and Lam step down.Hong Kong returned to China under a “one country, two systems” formula that allows freedoms not enjoyed in mainland China, including freedom to protest and an independent judiciary.Beijing denies interfering but, for many Hong Kong residents, the extradition bill is the latest step in a relentless march towards mainland control.China has been angered by criticism from Western capitals, including Washington and London, about the legislation. Beijing said on Monday that Britain had no responsibility for Hong Kong any more and was opposed to its “gesticulating” about the territory.THOUSANDS RALLYTens of thousands marched in temperatures of around 33 degrees Celsius (91.4°F) from Victoria Park in an annual rally. Many clapped as protesters held up a poster of Lam inside a bamboo cage.hong kong protests, hong kong protesters, hong kong extradition bill, hong kong extradition bill protests, carrie lam, world news, Indian Express A supporter holds a flag as he attends a rally to show their support for the police amid criticisms for its alleged mishandling of an anti-extradition protest, in Hong Kong. (Reuters)More than a million people have taken to the streets at times over the past three weeks to vent their anger.A tired-looking Lam appeared in public for the first time in nearly two weeks, flanked by her husband and former Hong Kong leader Tung Chee-hwa.“The incident that happened in recent months has led to controversies and disputes between the public and the government,” she said. “This has made me fully realise that I, as a politician, have to remind myself all the time of the need to grasp public sentiment accurately.”PROTEST MOVEMENT REINVIGORATEDBeijing’s grip over Hong Kong has intensified markedly since Xi took power and after pro-democracy street protests that gripped the city in 2014 but failed to wrestle concessions from China.The extradition bill has sent jitters across all sectors of Hong Kong in an unprecedented backlash against the government.Tensions spiralled on June 12 when police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at anti-extradition protesters near the heart of the city, sending plumes of smoke billowing among some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers.hong kong protests, hong kong protesters, hong kong extradition bill, hong kong extradition bill protests, carrie lam, world news, Indian Express Tens of thousands of protesters march on a street to protest against the unpopular extradition bill in Hong Kong. (AP)The uproar has reignited a protest movement that had lost steam after the failed 2014 demonstrations that led to the arrests of hundreds.Activists raised a black bauhinia flag to half mast outside the Legislative Council building before the rally and turned Hong Kong’s official flag, featuring a white bauhinia flower on a red background, upside down.The turmoil comes at a delicate time for Beijing, which is grappling with a trade dispute with the United States, a faltering economy and tensions in the South China Sea.Opponents of the extradition bill fear it would put them at the mercy of China’s justice system, where human rights are not guaranteed. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence More Explained Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Taking stock of monsoon rain Post Comment(s)last_img read more

On table in Haryana Creche in offices with 50 or more employees

first_img Haryana DGP: Child and adult begging prevalent in Chandigarh, not Panchkula Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence The draft rules state that women employees will be allowed to make four visits of 20 minutes each to the creche during working hours, apart from a rest period of 30 minutes for themselves.Aiming to amend the Haryana Maternity Benefit Rules 1967, the draft states that the facility will accommodate children under the age of six years. It also says the move will cover regular, temporary, daily wage, contractual and consultant employees.The earlier rules did not provide for any such facility. However, the chief inspector of the state’s Labour Department has been empowered to allow multiple establishments to use a single creche if the official is convinced that it will not result in inconvenience to employees. Advertising creches offices, women employees creches, haryana offices creches, haryana govt creches, haryana govt, creches in public offices, Haryana Maternity Benefit Rules 1967, haryana labour department, india news, indian express Aiming to amend the Haryana Maternity Benefit Rules 1967, the draft states that the facility will accommodate children under the age of six years. (File/Express photo by Tashi Tobgyal)WOMEN EMPLOYEES in Haryana may soon be able to take care of their children while at work. Last week, the state government notified draft rules to make a “creche facility” mandatory for every establishment — private and public — that has 50 or more employees. Advertising Best Of Express After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan center_img Related News The draft rules were notified on July 9, when the government invited suggestions and objections to be submitted at the office of the state’s Labour Commissioner within 45 days, after which the initiative will be implemented.Officials said the move follows instructions from the Union Ministry of Labour and Employment this February asking state governments to extend this benefit to women employees. According to a 2016 census of Haryana government employees, women comprise around 34 per cent of their total strength in the state.According to the draft rules, the creche has to be established by the employer within the work-place premises or 500m from its entrance. They also state that if a child is less than 15 months old, the mother would be allowed additional visits of 20 minutes each, depending on the need.“Although several states are yet to amend their rules, Haryana has decided to implement it as early as possible. The draft rules have been notified and shall soon be implemented,” a senior government official told The Indian Express. BSEH Class 10, 12 compartment exam 2019 admit card released, how to check via website Written by Varinder Bhatia | Chandigarh | Updated: July 15, 2019 7:09:06 am Haryana Vision Zero project comes to Panchkula: 24 ‘black spots’ identified The draft rules have also laid down norms for the building that will house the creche: heat-resistant and waterproof material for roofs and walls, smooth surface for floors and interiors of walls, lime-washing of interior walls every six months. Besides, the woodwork inside should be painted or varnished once every three years.The norms also state that the creche should have a minimum space of 6-8 sq ft per child to ensure that children can play, rest and learn without hindrance. It stipulates that the height of the rooms should not be less than 12 feet.Among the other facilities, each creche should have first-aid and medicine kits, cradles, cots with bedding, cooking facilities, cooking utensils, feeding utensils, washrooms, facilities to wash soiled clothes, emergency lighting, adequate ventilation and emergency power back-up.Apart from trained staff, employers will also have to ensure that medical examination of children is conducted every month by a registered medical practitioner, with records to be maintained. 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

Strong quake causes panic in eastern Indonesia tsunami warning lifted

first_imgA hospital in Manado, the capital of North Sulawesi province, was damaged and patients evacuated, according to a local disaster official.The quake caused panic in the city of Ternate in the Maluku island chain, where people ran to higher ground, a witness told The Associated Press.The disaster agency said residents in Manado ran out of their homes in panic. It said residents in North Sulawesi and North Maluku should return to their homes.Indonesia, a vast archipelago of 260 million people, is frequently struck by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis because of its location on the “Ring of Fire,” an arc of volcanoes and fault lines in the Pacific Basin. By AP |Jakarta | Updated: July 8, 2019 7:34:45 am Advertising Related News The U.S. Geological Survey said the magnitude 6.9 quake was centered 185 kilometers (115 miles) southeast of Manado in the Molucca Sea at a depth of 24 kilometers (15 miles).The national disaster agency said the tsunami warning that was in place for North Sulawesi and North Maluku was canceled just after midnight, about two hours after the quake hit.It said it was still gathering information but was hampered by loss of communications with disaster officials in North Maluku. indonesia earthquake, Indonesia quake, Indonesia tsunami, earthquake in indonesia, indonesia tsunami warning, tsunami warning in indonesia, indonesia earthquake tsunami warning, world news, Indian Express The U.S. Geological Survey said the magnitude 6.9 quake was centered 185 kilometers (115 miles) southeast of Manado in the Molucca Sea at a depth of 24 kilometers (15 miles).A strong subsea earthquake late Sunday night caused panic in parts of eastern Indonesian and triggered a tsunami warning that was later lifted. There were no immediate reports of major damage or casualties. Post Comment(s) Face of Indonesia disaster relief efforts dies at 49 Advertising Indonesian woman jailed for reporting sexual harassment to seek amnesty Undersea quake south of Indonesia’s Bali causes brief panic last_img read more

If Sidhu doesnt want to do his job theres nothing I can

first_imgBy Express News Service |New Delhi | Updated: July 15, 2019 3:44:18 pm Amarinder Singh, Navjot Singh Sidhu, Sidhu Amarinder Singh, Sidhu resigns, Punjab cabinet, Punjab congress, Indian Express, latest news Capt Amarinder said that Sidhu was the only member who had problems. (Express Photos)A day after Navjot Singh Sidhu made his decision to resign from the Punjab Cabinet public, Chief Minister Captain Amarinder Singh Monday said that if he does not want to do his job, there is nothing Singh could do about it. The minister should have accepted his new portfolio instead of shunning the work in the middle of the crucial Paddy season, said the chief minister. Sidhu’s quit letter raises hopes of MLAs eyeing Punjab cabinet berth “If Sidhu doesn’t want to do the job, there is nothing I can do about it,” said Captain Amarinder.Questioning how a soldier could refuse a job assigned by the General, Amarinder added that there has to be some discipline in the government if it is to function effectively.Pointing out that he had reshuffled portfolios of 13 of the 17 ministers in his cabinet after the Lok Sabha elections, Amarinder said that Sidhu was the only member who had problems. He further added that the reshuffle was decided on the basis of the performance of the ministers, and Sidhu should have accepted his new department.Explained |  Why Navjot Singh Sidhu resigned as Punjab minister Explained: Why Navjot Singh Sidhu resigned as Punjab minister Successor Mohindra backs CM’s ‘non-performer’ tag for Sidhu Sidhu was given the crucial Power portfolio, which was particularly important at this time in view of the Paddy season, from June to October. With many parts of Punjab not receiving adequate rainfall, the power situation is critical, requiring day to day monitoring, said the Chief Minister.navjot singh sidhu, navjot singh sidhu quits cabinet, navjot singh sidhu quits punjab cabinet, navjot singh sidhu resigns from punjab cabinet, congress, amarinder singh, punjab news Navjot Singh Sidhu quit the Punjab Cabinet on Sunday.Asked if Sidhu had made any attempt at reconciliation, the Chief Minister said there was no need for it. “I do not have any issues with him. If Sidhu has any issues with me, you’ll have to ask him about them,” he said. He, however, clarified that he did not see any harm in the minister sending his papers to the Congress president directly as the state Cabinet was decided in consultation with the party high command. However, he added that he had been informed that the resignation was sent to his residence in Chandigarh but he was yet to see it.Read | Navjot Singh Sidhu’s cabinet colleagues calls resignation a ‘drama’ from ‘king of theatrics’The chief minister was in New Delhi and paid a courtesy call to Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Singh took the opportunity to discuss the 550th birth anniversary celebrations of Guru Nanak. “The prime minister confirmed his participation in the mega event and assured of all possible help to make the programme a grand success, befitting the historic occasion,” said the Chief Minister. The legacy issue of the Rs 31,000 crore food debt also came up for discussion and the prime minister said that he was briefed on the issue. 7 Comment(s) Advertising Related News Advertisinglast_img read more

Shocked someone placed on pedestal was accused MJ Akbars defence witness

first_img MJ Akbar, Priya Ramani, MeToo, MJ Akbar metoo, defamation case against priya ramani, sexual misconduct, Indian Expres M J Akbar’s cross-examination had ended on July 6. (Photo: Tashi Tobgyal/File)Hearing in the defamation case filed by former Union minister M J Akbar against journalist Priya Ramani resumed on Monday, with one witness testifying in favour of Akbar.Akbar’s cross-examination had ended on July 6. Akbar had resigned as a Minister of State after Ramani levelled allegations of sexual misconduct against him. He had subsequently filed a defamation lawsuit.During Monday’s hearing before the court of Additional Metropolitan Magistrate Samar Vishal, senior journalist Veenu Sandal, who wrote a column in The Asian Age on astrology, said that she was “shocked and it came as a huge jolt” when Ramani called Akbar a predator. Sandal said she was deeply distressed that someone she had placed on a pedestal could do what was alleged, and that Akbar’s “image and his persona fell before her eyes” and “his reputation was dragged through the mud”.She also told the court that she had never met Ramani, and did not “read anything prior to Ramani’s tweets about any allegations against Akbar by any other woman”. Advertising NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Advertising 1 Comment(s) Top News Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Ramani’s counsel Rebecca John asked Sandal whether she wrote an article titled ‘Partnering with ghosts of the other world’ in The Sunday Guardian on October 13, 2018, and whether it was written in the context of the “Me Too movement”. Sandal told the court that the article was on ghosts, and Me Too was only mentioned in the introduction. John also showed the witness an article titled ‘Humans during day, snakes at night’, which Sandal said she had written.John asked Sandal, “Is it correct that in your column… you frequently write on existence of ghosts… ichadhari snakes and communicating with the dead?”Sandal replied, “I don’t write about them frequently. I write about them always.” She said her brief was to write about “paranormal activities”. Written by Anand Mohan J | New Delhi | Published: July 16, 2019 4:29:12 amlast_img read more

Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions but lower mortality than

first_img Source:https://media.jamanetwork.com/news-item/holocaust-survivors-had-higher-rates-of-chronic-conditions-lower-rates-of-death/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 4 2019Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions but lower rates of death than a comparison group of individuals insured by the same healthcare services organization in Israel. Biological and psychosocial reasons that may help to explain the findings need more study but researchers suggest unique characteristics of resilience among Holocaust survivors and better health literacy may be among the possibilities.This observational study included more than 38,000 Holocaust survivors in Israel who were born between 1911 and 1945 in Europe and nearly 35,000 people in a control group born in Israel during those same years. Both groups were insured by Maccabi Healthcare Services in Israel. The study used data collected from 1998 through 2017 and looked at heart disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, cancer and death.​last_img read more

The electronics industry sees money in your health

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 16 2019If the scores of personal health care devices at the Consumer Electronics Show last week are any indication, it’s clear that the Apple Watch has kicked off a rush by high-tech companies to capitalize on people’s worries about their health.The latest version of the watch, which was announced last fall, detects a fibrillating heart and a propensity for falls. What other manufacturers learned from that is that you can make money if you can create a worry about a problem that people didn’t realize they had and also create a solution for that worry via a high-tech product. Many of the products at the mammoth annual show seemed to be following that strategy.In A Rush To Brush?Take, for instance, the problem of the length of time it takes to brush your teeth. With Y-Brush, you can cut down that onerous two-minute recommended time to 10 seconds, and supposedly still get your teeth cleaner.Makers of the Y-shaped device say it brushes all your top and then bottom teeth in five seconds each, giving each tooth four times the brush exposure it would get with a typical two-minute tooth-by-tooth brushing regimen recommended for users of a conventional electric toothbrush.The company says its device removes 15 percent more plaque than a traditional toothbrush. And, of course, you’ve freed up an additional 110 seconds in your life each time you brush.The $125 Y-Brush handle and brush will be sold online this year; additional brush heads, which need to be replaced every six months, will cost $25.Know Before You Gotta GoAnother problem: You can’t always predict when you need to go to the bathroom. DFree, a sensor worn a half-inch above the pubis bone, predicts when an individual will have to urinate, giving the wearer a chance to gauge how long they can be away from a toilet.The DFree monitors changes in bladder size and transmits that information to a smartphone app, which sends a customizable alert to the person when it’s time to find a toilet. The company says it doesn’t work for pregnant women or toilet-training toddlers.The unit costs $500, or it can be rented for $40 per month, with the rental price applied to an eventual purchase.Making Health A CinchDetecting falls, now a feature of the Apple Watch, is showing up in other devices. Like in this belt, which also can alert you to weight gain as it senses the belt getting tighter. (Yeah, like old-fashioned belts do.) The Welt smart belt, developed with seed money from Samsung, also monitors the time you spend sitting and the number of steps taken. Connected to a smartphone app (naturally), Welt suggests when a user should stand or change their eating habits and will also send a customized alert after a fall.For Top-Condition Cognition There was no shortage at the show of devices to improve your mental abilities. BrainTap, an app-based subscription series of audio music and vocal stimulations, provides visualization exercises that the company says will retrain your brain to allow you to relax, reduce stress and maximize your ability to lose weight.The company charges $10 to $30 a month for the series, based on whether you need to address only one or more conditions.As an added benefit, the company also sells an oddly priced $547 headset that beams blue light into your eyes. It uses light to stimulate your ears, following precepts of something called auriculotherapy, which employs light to activate, the company says, “the meridians known to directly affect the body’s organs and systems.”EKGs On The GoThe electronics industry seems to believe it can make money convincing people they should be worried about their hearts. A number of products that take a simplified form of an electrocardiogram (EKG) are already on the market, the Apple Watch and Kardia among them. The WitCard, from WitMonki, is a credit card-size device that, by touching two thumbs and one index finger, sends results to one’s health care provider where, using the company’s WitDisplayer portal, EKG readings over time can be compared and appropriate action taken when necessary.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairNovel bed system with VR brainwave-control for sleep blissStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsThe battery-operated WitCard is undergoing trials for European Union certification and approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and could cost about $120.Monitoring Your EnergyEver worry about whether you are burning carbs or fats? Well, now there’s a way. Breathe into the Lumen device each morning to get a reading of your carbon dioxide concentration. Based on that, a phone app determines how yesterday’s sleep, exercise and eating choices affected your ability to burn carbs or fats. Lumen also promises to tell you if you have sufficient energy stores before exercising (and what to do about it), why you feel tired all the time and how to alter your diet to lose weight.The company expects to ship its $249 device this August.Monitoring Your SleepPhilips, the giant electronics company, has become the latest company to soothe our worries about not getting enough sleep. Its SmartSleep, a $400 headband worn in bed, emits audible tones that supposedly detect and boost slow-wave, or deep, sleep — a time when breathing and heart rate are at their slowest.The intent of SmartSleep is to keep the wearer in the deep-sleep zone longer; it does not increase the amount of time one sleeps or help someone fall or stay asleep. And, if you are older, you are out of luck, as the device is recommended for people between 18 and 50. Philips says the slow-wave activity declines as we age and becomes more difficult to detect.A High-Tech Pill DispenserFinally, an obvious problem: how to remember to take multiple drugs multiple times per day. And, of course, there is a just-as-obvious solution: automated drug-dispensing devices.One of the latest products to attempt this is RxPense, which offers high-tech bells and whistles. The machine is loaded with hermetically sealed pill blister cards by a participating pharmacy. Once the card’s bar code confirms it’s the proper one and loaded into the machine, the patient is identified by facial recognition, an RFID bracelet or a PIN, and the proper pill pack, confirmed by the bar code on the packaging, is dispensed at the set time.But wait, there is more. A camera records the dispensed pills and the patient’s removal of them. Missed doses are not dispensed.The RxPense can be leased for $150 a month.The device can’t tell whether the patient has actually ingested the pill. For that, pills will need to include a digestible RFID tag to track its trip through the body. The FDA approved Abilify MyCite, the first drug with a built-in tracking sensor, in 2017.Don’t be surprised to see a device at next year’s show that can tell you where those tagged pills are.last_img read more