GMC Syclone revived as a 455hp aftermarket brute

first_imgThe vehicle manufacturer that brought you the 1,000-horsepower Yenko/SC Stage II Camaro has now revived one of the craziest sport-truck badges and given it a dose of modernity.Specialty Vehicle Engineering on Tuesday unveiled the reimagined GMC Syclone sport truck. The conversion starts with a base 2019 GMC Canyon extended-cab midsize pickup in either 2WD or 4WD configuration. Its standard engine is swapped out in favor of a supercharged 3.6-liter V6 that puts out a positively delightful 455 hp, a far cry from the standard V6’s 308-hp output.Of course, all that extra power necessitates beefing up the Syclone in other ways. There’s a performance front brake upgrade that adds six-piston front calipers and two-piece slotted front brake rotors. The truck has been lowered 2 inches in the front and 5 inches in the rear for more car-like handling. The suspension’s been further tweaked by way of new traction bars, bushings, shock absorbers and rear sway bar. That power makes its way to the ground through 20-inch wheels wearing Y-rated performance tires. There’s also a new exhaust system that should provide a much meatier growl than the stock setup.Enlarge ImageThe Canyon’s design is a little long in the tooth, but SVE’s enhancements result in a pretty cool look, not too far from the Syclone of old. Specialty Vehicle Engineering The new Syclone also packs some aesthetic enhancements. On the outside, there’s a new hood with a power bump and a “455HP” badge. The rocker panels sport extensions, the grille surround is color-matched to the body, and that matching extends to the grille bars and rear bumper, too. Inside, there are custom-trimmed seats with Syclone graphics, new floor mats, a numbered dash plaque and unique key fobs. Only 100 will be built, and each Syclone will command a $39,995 premium on top of the truck’s MSRP. It could be worse — SVE’s 1,000-horsepower Camaro required $66,995 on top of the Camaro’s window sticker. The best part is, the truck can be ordered through a GMC dealer.Produced only in 1991, GMC built 2,995 examples of the original Syclone. Based on the Sonoma compact truck, it became the quickest pickup truck on the market, thanks to its turbocharged 4.3-liter V6, which put out 280 hp and 350 pound-feet of torque. It was capable of a sub-5-second sprint to 60 miles per hour, which is nuts for 1991 — and still pretty impressive today.Specialty Vehicle Engineering  Inc Syclone RearEnlarge ImageMaxing out the payload capacity with a lowered suspension probably isn’t the best idea. Specialty Vehicle Engineering 2019 Chevy Camaro ZL1 Convertible review: A topless thrill ride Post a comment More From Roadshow Trucks Sports Cars 0 More about 2019 GMC Sierra AT4 Preview • 2019 GMC Sierra: Mo’ tailgates, no problemscenter_img Review • 2019 GMC Sierra AT4: A plush truck for mild off-roading 2019 Ford Mustang Shelby GT350 first drive: A more approachable track star Tags GMC Share your voice 2019 Chevy Blazer first drive: Sharp style, smooth ridelast_img read more

New York might fine you for texting while crossing the street

first_imgYou might get fined in New York for texting if this bill becomes law. Christian Vierig / Getty Images No matter how important your text might be, if you’re crossing the street, New York thinks it can wait. New York state Sen. John Liu introduced a bill last week that would ban texting while walking. Pedestrians could be fined between $25 and $250 if they’re seen “using any portable device” while crossing a roadway, according to a copy of the bill obtained by The Guardian. “Using” a device means looking at it, playing games, being online, sending emails, texting and more, according to the bill. The legislation makes exceptions for emergency first-responders and those trying to contact hospitals, fire departments, police and other emergency services.”This bill in no way absolves drivers of their mandate to yield to pedestrians, and simply reminds people to resume texting after getting across the street safely,” Liu said in an emailed statement. Marco Conner, interim executive director of Transportation Alternatives, said he is opposed to the bill. “We should first identify the problem and the cause,” Conner said.Conner said that Liu fails to cite data that pedestrians are the ones causing their own injuries or deaths by walking into traffic while distracted. Instead, Conner said a recent rise in pedestrian fatalities nationwide “is believed to all be driver related.”In terms of solutions, Conner said he doesn’t see more regulation of phones as the answer. Conner said reducing vehicle speeds and reducing the number of vehicles on the streets should be priorities instead. Tags 3 Commentscenter_img Share your voice Mobilelast_img read more