Publishers Reveal Digital Storefront Plans

first_imgThe publishers said the goal of the venture is fourfold: to create a highly featured common reading application capable of rendering the distinctive look and feel of each publication; to create a robust publishing platform that’s optimized for multiple devices, operating systems and screen sizes; to create a digital storefront offering an “extensive selection” of reading options; and to create a selection of advertising opportunities.For advertisers, the group said this new initiative will provide them with innovative ad formats that “benefit from the highly engaging, interactive nature of this new medium.”It was not immediately clear if the group is developing the technology behind the initiative in-house, or has partnered with a technology vendor. It also wasn’t clear how much each publishing partner has invested in the project so far. A spokesperson did not immediately return a request for comment.The publishers said they collectively represent an audience of 144.6 million, according to MRI figures. As was expected, a consortium of some of the industry’s biggest magazine publishers today unveiled plans to develop open standards for a new digital storefront à la iTunes, as well as the related technology to allow consumers to access magazines on portable digital devices.Publishers involved in the venture include Time Inc., Condé Nast, Hearst and Meredith Corp. News Corp. also is part of the initiative. The group said it will eventually welcome other publishers to use the technology, too.As was previously reported, Time Inc. executive vice president John Squires will lead the initiative, at least in the interim, as managing director. “For the consumer, this digital initiative will provide access to an extraordinary selection of engaging content products, all customized for easy download on the device of their choice, including smartphones, e-readers and laptops,” he said in a statement announcing the initiative. “Once purchased, this content will be ‘unlocked’ for consumers to enjoy anywhere, anytime, on any platform.”last_img read more

Focus On Medias Great Realignment At the ACT III Conference

first_imgOxford, Mississippi—Magazine publishers from a broad cross section of the industry spent two days presenting their best practices and innovative ideas for an era of transition during the third annual ACT III conference at the University of Mississippi.Like at the AMC in San Francisco last week, the underlying theme of the event was whether print media’s best days are behind it. And if it is, the question was how long the decline will take, and how far down print will go. And like at the AMC, there was no broad agreement. In fact, said opening keynoter Sid Holt, executive director of the American Society of Magazine Editors, no one really knows what form the business will take in the years ahead. And in the meantime, publishers described how they’re innovating and iterating to serve the changing needs of their communities.The conference, organized by Samir Husni, founder and director of the Magazine Innovation Center here, featured an eclectic mix of speakers, from Rebecca Darwin, CEO of the acclaimed Garden & Gun, to Michael Capuzzo, publisher of Northern Pennsylvania’s Mountain Home, and author of the best-selling real-life shark thriller, “Close to Shore.” There were 145 attendees at the event, which also featured tours of the historic city and a visit to the Mississippi Delta, the birthplace of blues music. Because it’s held in an academic setting, the event included students as attendees and sometimes participants, and many speakers geared their remarks to the next generation of journalists as well.Even as individual magazine operators and entrepreneurs told their own stories, the state of the industry was summed up in a presentation by Bob Sacks, the newsletter publisher and chronicler of the state of the magazine industry. “We’re in a period of what I call the great realignment,” Sacks said. “We’re going from being primarily print-revenue based to one that’s primarily digital. But for print, a loss of dominance does not equal death. There will be hundreds of billions of dollars to be made in the reading industry.”Sacks also urged publishers to reinvent themselves before someone else does, and from the tone of the presentations, the attendees and speakers at ACT III are busy doing just that.For example, in 2009, when it was in danger of being shut down, Garden & Gun set itself to developing new ways to connect, Darwin recalled. “I really always envisioned that this would be a national magazine that was about a region and a lifestyle,” she said. “But during that time, the four “P’s”—paper, printing, prepress and postal—kept coming. And at the same time the advertisers were paying late. So I got the staff together and said, ‘We have got to come up with something that will generate some revenue. We created a club. We came up with the membership levels ourselves. We came up with the names, and now we have a very loyal audience and the club is working well.”And Kevin P. Keefe, vice president of editorial at Kalmbach Publishing Co. described a variety of spinoff business lines in his company’s markets, which focus on railroading, model railroading and other enthusiast markets. Included in these products are track plans for modeling enthusiasts available for sale online, railroad maps that tell different stories about the industry, and DVD archives of back issues of print magazines. “These are the most profitable products we’ve ever produced,” Keefe said, crediting Sue Roman of Taunton Press for the idea. “It’s insane how popular they are.”Two speakers, Keefe and Jim Elliott, president of The James. G. Elliott Co., noted that apps have not played out as well as many publishers had hoped. “[The] Apple Newsstand hasn’t been quite the bonanza we were hoping for, but it still has been a positive,” Keefe said.Perhaps the most passionate speaker was Capuzzo, who summarized the true value of the industry: “It starts with the writer,” he said. “One of the things I wanted to talk about was content. At Mountain Home, we’ve suffered for something, and I hope this is it.”Paraphrasing Oxford native William Faulkner, Capuzzo said, “Journalism, at least on the newspaper side, has been a utopian venture, except they are aiming it at a tragic species.”Tony Silber is the general manager of FOLIO: Magazine.More on this topic Embrace Digital, IMAG Attendees Warned Bob Sacks Offers View of Industry at Circ Day LA Magazines Wrestle with Future Business Model At Association-Publishing and Printing Conference, Print Publishers Are Told to Change Their Focus FOLIO: Show Opens in Chicago Overheard at IMAGJust In Four More Execs Depart SourceMedia in Latest Restructuring Editor & Publisher Magazine Sold to Digital Media Consultant BabyCenter Sold to Ziff Davis Parent J2 Media | News & Notes Shanker Out, Litterick In as CEO of EnsembleIQ This Just In: Magazines Are Not TV Networks TIME Names New Sales, Marketing Leads | People on the MovePowered bylast_img read more

Outbrain Rallies an Additional 35 Million

first_imgOutbrain has now raised a total of $99 million after tacking on another reported $35 million this week. The content recommendation company is said to be targeting a valuation of $1 billion, and will look to raise $100-300 million in order to roll out its IPO.Of course right now everything is speculative, and despite the flurry of investments into Outbrain, no statement has been issued regarding a possible IPO, new product launch or acquisition. The company has only stated that its investment rounds are nothing more than fundraising opportunities. What exactly they are fundraising for remains a mystery.Outbrain’s product is innocuously positioned at the bottom of content pages, and offers readers links to similar content. The company reports that the product has been installed on more than 100,000 sites, including a network of 700 “premium publishers.” Also, the company says that it offers up more than 100 billion recommendations each month.last_img read more

Around the Navy Marianas Bases Withstand Super Typhoon Homes near Virginia Airfield

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Installations on the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands remain “mission capable” despite absorbing a battering Thursday from Super Typhoon Yutu’s sustained winds of 180 mph. “There have been reports of major damage to structures and property, but all U.S. military personnel are currently accounted for,” Lt. Cmdr. Karl Lettow, a Joint Region Marianas spokesman, told Stars and Stripes. Crews began clearing debris and continue to assess conditions, but leaders expect Friday to be a normal workday, Lettow said. The cyclone left widespread destruction on the islands of Saipan and Tinian. … The Navy is proposing to spend $5.2 million to connect six homes located near an auxiliary landing field used by Naval Air Station Oceana to the municipal water system, after the homeowners’ wells consistently revealed elevated levels of PFAS contaminants over the past two years.  The Navy has been providing bottled water to workers at Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Fentress in Chesapeake and nearby homes with contaminated wells since 2016, reports the Virginian-Pilot. The Navy has agreed to test private drinking water wells near the auxiliary field twice a year. … The Navy on Wednesday released its business operations plan for fiscal years 2019-2021, an effort aimed at achieving greater efficiencies that will allow it to reallocate resources from business operations to readiness and rebuilding naval forces. “As we look forward to the future, we must continue this momentum by leveraging every resource, expert, leading practice, and efficiency we can find — from all sources, private and public — to think anew about our business operating model,” Navy Secretary Richard Spencer said, according to a press release.Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Jackie Paulast_img read more

From Swiggy delivery boy to Bengaluru Central LS candidate Jenifar Russel has

first_imgJenifar J RusselfacebookAmong the top political leaders contesting from Karnataka’s Bengaluru Central Lok Sabha constituency comes a common man to fight against the political tyranny and corruption.It might come as a surprise that Jenifar J Russel, a food delivery executive for Swiggy, is also contesting from the constituency as an independent candidate.The 38-year-old has done many odd jobs before marking his political debut against the top shot leaders in Bengaluru with his election symbol as a dish antenna.Hailing from Kerala’s capital Thiruvananthapuram, Russel had quit his job in the corporate sector as a telecom engineer and took a different path and did odd jobs to understand the problems faced by the common people.According to reports, Russel took a break in his career and started doing low-profile jobs, including working as a traffic police warden in the Kerala Police for a few months in 2015 and also as a cab driver with Uber.”Since November, I have been working as a cab driver to travel across Bengaluru. I could understand the problems of the common man, like a driver. Earlier I used to make fun of Swacch Bharat and other such schemes. But then I realised how we need it so much. We require many more toilets and where we have toilets, we need to maintain them in a better way,” Russel told The News Minute.Russel wants to fight for the common people and destroy corruption that has affected the very veins of our system. He has not joined any political party nor has made an alliance.He said that he joined the food delivery app to reach out to the people and understand their problems, especially the youngsters. Russel started his election campaigning in November 2018 and as its first step, he started distributing pamphlets with a list of promises to every voter that he met on his journey including his Uber and Swiggy customers.But would this election favour Russel against the top shot candidates like Rizwan Arshad of Congress, actor-turned-politician Prakash Raj and Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) candidate PC Mohan? Guess we will have to wait and watch.last_img read more

Galveston County Takes Another Step For Pelican Island Spans

first_img Share flickr/Patrick FellerBascule bridge over Pelican Island Channel on Seawolf Parkway in Galveston.GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — Galveston County commissioners have taken another step to encourage the Port of Houston Authority to support plans for a new road and rail bridges to Pelican Island.The Galveston County Daily News reports commissioners on Tuesday approved a memo of understanding calling for the Houston port, which owns about 1,100 acres on the island, to provide land. The property could be used for new spans connecting to Seawolf Parkway.Galveston County in November approved a deal with Galveston for construction of two new bridges to Pelican Island, using city property. The existing two-lane drawbridge for Pelican Island, which is home to Texas A&M University-Galveston, was built in 1957.Commissioner Ryan Dennard says the current vehicle bridge is deteriorating. County officials also say a rail bridge could spur development.Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Suspect At West University Shooting Had No History of Mental Health Issues

first_img Share Al OrtizHouston police investigate a mass shooting in West University, Houston, on September 26th, 2016.Nathan Desai, the suspect at the active shooter incident in the West University area last month, had no known mental health issues or criminal history, Houston Police Department said on Wednesday on a press release.The HPD also confirmed that Desai, who was pronounced dead at the scene after being felled by police, was wearing a replica of a World War II German SS General’s uniform and that he had a license to carry a handgun. The Department also released the names of the police officers who discharged their weapons during the incident. The list includes five HPD oficers, three Bellaire officers and one West University officer.None of the officers were hurt that morning but nine people were shot or injured by the suspect as he shot at cars driving through the area.last_img read more

Joe Biden Announces Presidential Run

first_img Michael Dwyer/AP FileIn this April 18, 2019, file photo, former vice president Joe Biden speaks at a rally in support of striking Stop & Shop workers in Boston. 00:00 /29:10 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: X Listen After months of deliberation, former Vice President Joe Biden finally announced his decision to throw his hat in the ring for the 2020 Presidential Election.This week on Party Politics, co-hosts Brandon Rottinghaus and Jay Aiyer analyze who are the front runners for 2020 and discuss whether Biden has a real shot of winning the Democratic nomination.Jay and Brandon also discuss ideological shifts in the Democratic Party and how they could impact the 2020 election.NATIONAL2020 Presidential roundup – Congressman Seth Moulton is in; Elizabeth Warren’s answer on student debtPresident Trump cancels Iranian oil sanction waiversMueller report fallout, Treasury misses deadline for Trump tax returnsHouse Oversight Committee v. President Trump on financial recordsTEXASMJ Hegar announces Senate runDallas and San Antonio municipal roundupTexas House votes to legalize the farming of industrial hempDebate on property tax and school finance billsEnd of Confederate Heroes Day?End of Daylight Savings Time?You can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts. Tweet us using #PartyPoliticsPod or email partypoliticspod@houstonpublicmedia.org. Party Politics is produced by Sophie Moll, the audio engineer is Todd Hulslander and our digital editor is Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz. This article is part of the Party Politics podcast Sharelast_img read more

Study shows one reason why pigeons so rarely crash

first_img More information: Pigeons trade efficiency for stability in response to level of challenge during confined flight, C. David Williams, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1407298112 AbstractIndividuals traversing challenging obstacles are faced with a decision: they can adopt traversal strategies that minimally disrupt their normal locomotion patterns or they can adopt strategies that substantially alter their gait, conferring new advantages and disadvantages. We flew pigeons (Columba livia) through an array of vertical obstacles in a flight arena, presenting them with this choice. The pigeons selected either a strategy involving only a slight pause in the normal wing beat cycle, or a wings-folded posture granting reduced efficiency but greater stability should a misjudgment lead to collision. The more stable but less efficient flight strategy was not used to traverse easy obstacles with wide gaps for passage but came to dominate the postures used as obstacle challenge increased with narrower gaps and there was a greater chance of a collision. These results indicate that birds weigh potential obstacle negotiation strategies and estimate task difficulty during locomotor pattern selection. Explore further Feral pigeon (Columba livia) in flight. Credit: Alan D. Wilson/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 2.5 © 2015 Phys.org City dwellers know that pigeons are some of the best flyers around, unlike robins and other birds, pigeons rarely collide with cars, buildings, trees or any other obstacle. That skill has not gone unnoticed—scientists and engineers have been working for years to duplicate their abilities. In this new effort, Williams and Biewener taught some of their tamed specimens to fly through a corridor to get to a meal, then introduced obstacles and high speed cameras to find out how it is that the birds are so good at avoiding objects in their path.The obstacles were plastic pipes, placed vertically some distance apart from one another. To pass between the pipes, the birds had to scrunch themselves a bit, but how they did so, the researchers found, depended on how far apart the pipes were. They noted that when the pipes were at least a half a wing length apart, the birds lifted their wings as if to flap as they approached the obstacle, but then held them steady, above their heads as they passed between the pipes, then flapped down as soon as they were through—a technique that led to very little loss of altitude, which meant it was quite efficient. But if the pipes were moved closer together, they pulled their wings into their body, a less efficient approach, but one much less likely to result in wing damage. To make sure the first approach was not merely coincident based on where the wings were when the birds arrived at the obstacle, the researchers filmed them multiple times, finding the same result each time.Because the birds used two different techniques for allowing them safe passage through the pipe obstacles, based on what they observed as they approached, the researchers believe that choosing which technique to use was a deliberate act, which meant the birds somehow made a choice of which technique to use, just before they passed through—very impressive, especially when noting that birds, except for some such as crows or magpies, are not generally known for their smarts. Citation: Study shows one reason why pigeons so rarely crash (2015, March 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-pigeons-rarely.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Researchers conduct study to determine impact of using drones to study birds This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Harvard University has uncovered one of the secrets behind pigeons’ impressive flight abilities. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, David Williams and Andrew Biewener describe how they videotaped some of the birds flying through an obstacle course they made, and what they found when they examined the footage.last_img read more