Awardwinning Corner Gas star Janet Wright dead at 71

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook Award-winning stage and screen actress Janet Wright, best known for her portrayal of the long-suffering matriarch on “Corner Gas,” has died, according to CTV, which aired the long-running sitcom.Wright played Emma Leroy on the hit Canadian series, which ended its six-season run in 2009 and returned with a big-screen adaptation in 2014.Wright’s character Emma was the wife of Oscar Leroy, played by Eric Peterson, and mother to Brent, portrayed by series creator and star Brent Butt. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Twitter Peterson, who had known Wright for 50 years, said she was “an incredibly, wonderfully complex woman of tremendous strength and intelligence and a wonderful actress.”“She knew a lot about the art of acting and the art of theatre as a director,” Peterson said Monday.“The wonderful thing about her as an actress — especially in something like ‘Corner Gas’ — she brought so much to that part as only Janet could. Even the simplest line, she thoroughly thought it through. She seemed to be able to give a straightforward line that was redolent with meaning. Often my character was the brunt of that redolent meaning too.“I’m just very sad. We’re the same age. One’s reminded how short life is.”In a statement, Butt added “Janet was like no other person I’ve ever met.”“She had a giant wit, a giant heart, and was one of the strongest human beings to ever stride around this planet.”Born in England on March 8, 1945, Wright and her family relocated to Canada and eventually settled in Saskatoon at a young age.Wright was the co-founder of Saskatoon’s Persephone Theatre, and performed at virtually every major theatre company in Canada.She had been affiliated with the Vancouver Arts Club Theater since the early 1970s, and also directed for many major theatre companies across Canada, including productions at Ontario’s Stratford Festival.“Janet was an artist on an uncompromising search for the truth in all its unvarnished beauty,” said Stratford Festival artistic director Antoni Cimolino, who directed Wright as Ma Joad in the 2011 production of “The Grapes of Wrath.”“She was a profoundly talented actress, director and champion for the importance of the arts. I will never forget her passion and forever be inspired by her commitment to our work.”She won the best actress Genie Award in 1992 for “Bordertown Cafe,” and won the best supporting actress in a dramatic program or miniseries award in 2003 for “Betrayed.”Her film credits include “The Perfect Storm,” opposite George Clooney and Mark Wahlberg, and TV appearances on series “Dark Angel,” “The King of Kensington” and “The Beachcombers.by Lauren La Rose, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Wilson Recounts Harrowing Minutes for B1 Crew after Seat Fails to Eject

first_imgIn the stirring conclusion to her keynote remarks at the 2018 Defense Communities National Summit Monday, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson recounted the courage of a B-1 crew responding to a fire in the wing. When the seat of the first crew member attempting to eject malfunctioned, the commander of the B-1 Lancer decided to attempt an emergency landing. A transcript of the crew’s story as told by the secretary can be found in Air Force Times.Air Force photo by Wayne Clark Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Convention of the excluded in Sreemangal

first_imgWith the slogan ‘Leaving no one behind’, a two-day convention of the marginal and excluded communities begins in Sreemangal on Thursday.Representatives of the tea communities, trade unions, ethnic communities and other excluded groups, the civil society and community-based organisations, state actors, human rights organisations and cultural groups are expected to join the convention and cultural festival.Its aim is to bring the challenge of exclusion and marginalisation – major feature of poverty – into the national focus, according to organisers.Eminent economist former caretaker government adviser Wahiduddin Mahmud is scheduled to address the convention as chief guest.Four organisations – Power and Participation Research Centre (PPCR), Society for Environment and Human Development (SEHD), Christian Commission for Development in Bangladesh (CCDB) and Gram Bikash Kendra – organised the convention as part of a multi-year initiative.At the convention, the organisers will share findings of relevant studies and analyses and will try to come out with recommendations on how to deal with the issues of marginalisation and exclusion, said a news release issued on Wednesday.There are a lot of marginalised and excluded people living in Bangladesh, who speak different languages and have different cultures. There are 27 small ethnic communities in Bangladesh, according to government census.last_img read more

Three Tips for Using Public WiFi Safely

first_img In an era of laptops, smartphones and mushrooming Wi-Fi networks, we can get online nearly anywhere. But we often connect without considering the potential perils.Sensitive information you transmit over Wi-Fi can be literally “sniffed” from the airwaves by a nearby snoop using readily available software and equipment. What’s more, hackers could trick you into connecting to their computer by making it appear to be a legitimate Wi-Fi hotspot.Despite these risks, it’s relatively easy and inexpensive to surf safely. Here are three tips for securely using Wi-Fi networks when you’re on-the-go, doing work in hotels, airports, cafés and other public places.1. Avoid automatically connecting to Wi-Fi hotspots.It can be tempting to quickly jump online using one of the 1.4 million public Wi-Fi networks now active in the world. But you could unwittingly connect to a rogue hotspot set up by a crook to gather sensitive information transmitted by unsuspecting users like you.Industry group Wi-Fi Alliance recommends that Web users carefully select which, if any, public network they access rather than allow their device to connect automatically. It also recommends choosing only hotspots that use security technologies known as Wi-Fi Protected Access version two, or WPA2, which are stronger than the older WPA and Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) technologies. A network’s security system is displayed in the box where you enter a password to connect.Related: What to Do If Your Business Gets Hacked 2. Make sure sensitive websites you use encrypt data you send and receive. Sending and receiving information on unsecured public wireless networks can be like shouting in a crowded room, says Maxim Weinstein, executive director of StopBadware, a Cambridge, Mass., nonprofit group that fights malicious websites. “Unless you’re talking in code, it’s no secret to anyone who’s listening.”Fortunately, most websites that handle sensitive information use encryption technology known as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to turn readable text into a mash of digital gibberish. You know SSL is in place if you see “https” in the address bar. It is almost always at work when you’re making a purchase or banking online.Related: How to Protect Android Smartphones From Cyber AttacksMany communication services, such as Google’s Gmail, Microsoft’s Hotmail and Facebook, also use SSL to keep your private communications safe from eavesdroppers. Some services, such as Gmail, use HTTPS by default at all times, but Facebook and others require you to turn the technology on.To activate it on Facebook, click on the down arrow in the upper right corner and select Account Settings. In the left column, click Security and enable Secure Browsing.3. Install and use VPN software on your device to encrypt your Internet activity. “Virtual private network” software is a must-have for road warriors who regularly transmit sensitive data over public Wi-Fi networks. VPN software creates an encrypted tunnel through which your data flows as it traverses the Internet. Employees at many large companies already use VPNs on business trips to protect valuable corporate information, and small companies would be wise to follow suit.If you don’t have an information-technology department that can set up a VPN for you, consider using one of the personal VPNs now on the market. Options include PrivateWiFi from startup Private Communication Corp. (Windows and Mac, $9.95 a month or $84.95 a year; three-day free trial); Anonymizer Universal (Windows, Mac, iPhone and iPad, $79.99 a year; 14-day free trial); and VPN4ALL (Windows and Mac $9.95-$19.95 a month, depending on amount of data use; iPhone, iPad, Android, Windows Mobile and tablets, $5.95 a month).Related: What Technologies Banks Should Be Using to Keep Your Money SafeOpenVPN Technologies, keeper of the open-source technology behind some of these software products, sells a hosted VPN service specifically to small businesses called PrivateTunnel (Windows and Mac, price based on amount of data transferred).Another thing to consider: putting up a firewall to block strangers seeking access to your computer. Firewalls are typically provided by modern operating systems and are on by default. To make sure yours is active on a Windows PC, review Microsoft’s directions based on your operating system version. On Macs, open System Preferences and click Security & Privacy and then Firewall.You also can avoid Wi-Fi networks altogether and go online using a cellular connection from a wireless carrier, which use encryption when transferring data, albeit at a significant cost. Plan to pay for a large or unlimited data plan for a mobile device. For your laptop, you’ll need a special device that plugs into the side and a monthly service plan. Verizon and AT&T can charge $50 to $60 a month for 5 GB.  Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now » December 22, 2011 4 min readlast_img read more