Wilson Recounts Harrowing Minutes for B1 Crew after Seat Fails to Eject

first_imgIn the stirring conclusion to her keynote remarks at the 2018 Defense Communities National Summit Monday, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson recounted the courage of a B-1 crew responding to a fire in the wing. When the seat of the first crew member attempting to eject malfunctioned, the commander of the B-1 Lancer decided to attempt an emergency landing. A transcript of the crew’s story as told by the secretary can be found in Air Force Times.Air Force photo by Wayne Clark Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

PepsiCo bottler Varun Beverages IPO to open on October 26

first_imgPepsiCo Inc’s bottler Varun Beverages on Wednesday announced that its Initial Public Offering (IPO) valued at Rs 1,000 crore will open on October 26 and close on October 28. The price band has been set at Rs 440-445 per share.Proceeds from the IPO will be used to repay part of the Rs 1,700 crore debt, which was taken to boost its expansion plans over the last few years. Delhi-based businessman Ravi Jaipuria and his son Varun Jaipuria, who own the flagship firm, will each sell five million shares in the public offering, while the company will sell 15 million new shares.Kotak Mahindra Capital Co Ltd, Axis Capital Ltd, CLSA India Pvt. Ltd. and YES Securities (India) have been hired to manage the IPO.Varun Beverages accounts for about 45 percent of PepsiCo’s volumes in India. The firm is the only bottler and distributor of PepsiCo in the North and East India, with the exception of Jammu and Kashmir, Odisha, Bihar and Jharkhand regions, Jaipuria told the media.Last month, Varun Beverages Ltd won the stock market regulator’s approval for its Rs 1,000 crore worth Initial Public Offering. The company secured clearance from the Securities Exchange Board of India (Sebi) on August 31.In October last year, the company had raised Rs 600 crore from Aion Investments, a Singapore-based company. The company had then said it would utilise the funds for expanding its business and “refinancing debt.”Varun Beverages is PepsiCo’s product distributor in 17 states and two Union Territories across India. It is also PepsiCo’s second-largest bottler in South Asia and has, apart from India, operations in Nepal and Sri Lanka. It also sells PepsiCo’s products in parts of Africa.last_img read more

New social media vetting for visa applicants can hurt American Muslims advocates

first_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Aysha Khan ayshabkhan TagsDepartment of Homeland Security homepage featured Muslims social media visas,You may also like By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Aysha Khan Aysha Khan is a Boston-based journalist reporting on American Muslims and millennial faith for RNS. Her newsletter, Creeping Sharia, curates news coverage of Muslim communities in the U.S. Previously, she was the social media editor at RNS.,Load Comments,App for the blind is the latest in Jerusalem’s effort to make holy sites accessi … Share This! Catholicism By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Starting this month, most visa applicants hoping to travel or immigrate to the U.S. are required to provide five years’ worth of social media identities and other account information in their applications.The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s newly expanded social media monitoring policies will directly impact an estimated 15 million prospective visa applicants, but civil rights and legal advocates say the policy will infringe most on the rights of Muslim communities, both in the U.S. and abroad.“The concern with a policy like this is that it’s targeting a certain population,” said Faiza Patel, director of the liberty and national security program at New York University’s Brennan Center for Justice, which produced a report last month on the effects of the policy.The social media requirement was originally proposed under the Trump administration’s controversial “extreme vetting” immigration screening policy. Previously, the State Department had said that social media accounts were only required for travelers who had been “determined to warrant additional scrutiny in connection with terrorism or other national security-related visa ineligibilities.”Expanding the national security precautions to immigrant and nonimmigrant visa applicants further stifles free discussion and dissent, particularly among Muslim communities, according to Sahar Aziz, director of Rutgers University Law School’s Center for Security, Race and Rights.“The government is disproportionately targeting Muslims, both abroad and in the United States, and is looking for validation of stereotypes that they are terrorists or prone to becoming terrorists,” said Aziz.Opponents of the measure pointed out that social media is far too broad a tool to be effective in weeding out legitimate threats. No algorithm, experts said, can possibly be nuanced enough to understand slang, cultural norms and innocent exploration of political ideology.“It’s nearly impossible for machines to be able to interpret social media posts, especially by young people,” Aziz said. “Not only will you have innocent people, disproportionately Muslim, accused of being a security threat because the word ‘bomb’ is misinterpreted as being a literal bomb versus meaning ‘cool,’ but you’re also wasting the government’s resources. They’re just chasing red herrings.”Instead, the Brennan Center report found that surveillance of social media is likely to lead Muslims to curb their conversations online.“There’s an overall impact on freedom of religion and freedom of association because people will self-censor what they say online,” said Patel.In a statement last year after the State Department announced the plan, Hina Shamsi, director of the American Civil Liberty Union’s National Security Project, agreed with that assessment.The social media review “will infringe on the rights of immigrants and U.S. citizens by chilling freedom of speech and association, particularly because people will now have to wonder if what they say online will be misconstrued or misunderstood by a government official,” Shamsi said.Hina Shamsi, left, director of the ACLU’s National Security Project, addresses the media on a plaza in front of New York City Police Department headquarters on June 18, 2013. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)She noted that the policy could be used to “unfairly target immigrants and travelers from Muslim-majority countries for discriminatory visa denials, without doing anything to protect national security.”U.S. Muslims will likely see a chilling effect on their online activity as well, Patel added, since social media posts of immigrants living in diaspora communities around the country may be picked up in DHS sweeps of relatives and other online contacts looking to come to the U.S.About 82% of Muslims living in the U.S. are American citizens, including 42% who were born in the country and 40% who were born abroad but who have naturalized, according to a 2017 Pew survey.Travelers and immigrants from many foreign countries, including some Muslim-majority ones, may be accustomed to censoring themselves online to protect themselves from an authoritarian government, but the new surveillance policy will likely raise U.S. Muslims’ awareness level about what Aziz called the government’s increased adoption of “authoritarian practices.”The 2017 Pew survey found that 18% of U.S. Muslims say they have been singled out by airport security. The federal government’s secret watchlist system has compounded this profiling, civil rights advocates say, leaving thousands of U.S. citizens on what they say is an overly broad list that burdens innocent travelers.“Going back to the post-9/11 time to now, there have been consistent complaints from Muslim travelers, including Americans, that when they come into the U.S., they’re often asked about their religious views and their political affiliations,” Patel said. “What mosque they go to, how often they pray, things of that nature.”That history, combined with the Trump administration’s policies banning travel from several Muslim-majority countries, shows a “clear link to the view that being an observant Muslim somehow suggests that you are a potential terrorist threat,” Patel said.Shaima Swileh, center, stands with her husband, Ali Hassan, second from left, after Swileh arrived at San Francisco International Airport on Dec. 19, 2018. Swileh is the Yemeni mother who won her fight for a waiver from the Trump administration’s travel ban that would allow her to go to California to see her dying 2-year-old son. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)The social media monitoring program, she said, seems to originate from “the same well of bigotry and bias.”The Brennan Center’s report noted that social media information collected by DHS can be shared with other government, law enforcement and security agencies and that the DHS databases sometimes retain such information for years.“It’s unclear the extent to which benign political commentary can end up ruining someone’s life,” Aziz said. News Women sex abuse survivors tell Southern Baptists: ‘Our family is sick’ Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more