Donegal’s three Miss Ireland finalists hit the stage tonight

first_imgThree ambitious young women from Donegal have the 2019 Miss Ireland crown in their sights as they compete in the national final this Saturday.Miss Donegal Holly McCrea, Miss Letterkenny Anna Gallagher and Miss Kildare Naomi Molloy, who is from Glenties, are all taking to the stage of The Helix in Dublin in a bid to win the coveted title.There are 33 finalists in the competition, which was won by Buncrana’s Lauren McDonagh in 2017. Holly, Anna and Naomi have had a busy summer preparing for the final by carrying out charity fundraising for Variety Ireland, modelling and campaigning with their individual causes.Miss Donegal Holly McCreaMiss Donegal Holly McCrea (23) from Donegal Town is a secondary school teacher with a passion for supporting children with special education needs. She held a vintage tea party this summer in aid of Variety Ireland. And she flew to the Miss Ireland final in style today via Donegal Airport!Miss Letterkenny 2019 Anna GallagherMiss Letterkenny Anna Gallagher (21) is passionate about GAA. A Letterkenny Gaels stalwart, she coaches the minors and had an active summer with the Cúl Camps. When not involved in football, she’s working at Spar in Ballyraine. Anna has an Arts degree in Geography and Sociology and plans to do a Masters to become a secondary school teacher.Miss Kildare Naomi MolloyMiss Kildare Naomi Molloy (23) will be flying two flags this weekend – for Celbridge and for Glenties. Naomi is a graduate of Food Science and Business who now works in Sales at O’Brien Fine Foods. She launched a mental health week in her workplace and has been promoting positive mental health messages with her new platform. Excitement is building fast for the 72nd Miss Ireland final on Saturday night, where there is sure to be a large Donegal presence as friends and families cheer on their favourites.Donegal’s three Miss Ireland finalists hit the stage tonight was last modified: September 14th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Second-half latest: Preston 0 QPR 1 – Rangers under pressure at Deepdale

first_imgQPR had to absorb some pressure early in the second half at Deepdale, where Sebastian Polter’s early goal put them ahead. The German striker, left unmarked at the far post, headed home Alejandro Faurlin’s fifth-minute corner.Rangers have since defended well, although Jordan Hugill had a chance to equalise when he headed over from Greg Cunningham’s cross.And Polter almost forced a second goal when he beat shaky keeper Anders Lindegaard in the air to get his head to Karl Henry’s hanging cross, but the loose ball fell kindly for Preston.Preston made a determined start to the second period but Rangers have looked a threat on the counter attack, with the in-form Junior Hoilett involved in much of their best work.Hoilett crossed for Polter, whose effort flashed across the face of goal, and Alejandro Faurlin’s shot was blocked as the midfielder attempted to force the ball home.QPR: Smithies, Onuoha, Angella, Hill, Perch, Faurlin, Henry, Mackie, Chery, Hoilett, Polter.Subs: Ingram, Hall, Tozser, El Khayati, Washington, Luongo, Petrasso.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Gliffy Unveils the First Online Diagramming API

first_img3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now steven walling IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Tags:#enterprise#Products#saas Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…center_img Related Posts Gliffy, one of the top Web-based diagramming tools, has released the first API for any service of its kind. This software as a service just got a complete UI makeover, and that, plus this new move, will let Gliffy really lead the pack in this space.The API is in public beta as of today. The developers who got access to the trial run have already built some dead-useful extensions, such as a WordPress plugin that allows you to incorporate diagrams and a script that automatically backs up your Gliffy account to your local machine. Other SaaS diagram makers include Lovely Charts and Draw Anywhere, but with these latest upgrades, Gliffy’s real target is desktop software like Visio and OmniGraffle. Gliffy has a respectable customer base and a loyal following, but getting business users to leave the desktop apps they know (even if they hate them) has been an uphill battle. With the API, the company hopes that the ability to extend and integrate the service with other platforms will become too attractive to pass up. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

A Low-Energy House for Northern Minnesota

first_img BLOGS BY ELDEN LINDAMOOD Foundation and Nailbase Details for a Minnesota HouseInstalling Windows in a Minnesota House Relative Humidity and Makeup Air at a Tight Minnesota HouseA Follow-up From Northern Minnesota Nailbase panels on the exterior side of the 2×6 wallsThe main item that was the subject of the most consideration on this house was the wall assembly (see Image #4, below). Since wall assemblies are often the hottest debate topic here, let’s start with that.For the above-grade walls, I knew I wanted at least an R-45 assembly to meet my energy goals. I also initially wanted stone exterior cladding. As a result, the original plan utilized Quad-Loc ICF wall construction which I arrived at for a number of reasons. I wasn’t comfortable putting a masonry cladding over a high-R wood-framed wall, and I liked the security of a relatively storm-proof and rot proof ICF wall system.The pricing for the stone work came in astronomically high, as did the “Plan B” brick option. This reality, combined with the facts that nobody in my area was familiar with Quad-Loc forms, and the nearest supplier was 200 miles away, started to chip away at the ICF wall strategy.Ultimately, the cost of the concrete for the walls plus the nagging global-warming-potential guilt put the final nail in the ICF coffin. I begrudgingly decided to opt for a wood-framed wall with wood siding over a furred rainscreen.Our design firm has done many double-stud walls with dense-packed cellulose. My builder of choice was also familiar with double-stud wall construction and had proved to be meticulous at detailing an interior vapor retarder/air barrier, achieving impressive blower door results well below my target.However I have been increasingly concerned about the potential for moisture problems with double-stud walls, and more and more interested in continuous exterior foam strategies. I had numerous conversations with other nerdy types about the merits of using the structural sheathing as the air barrier in the assembly and concluded that it was the best strategy. Just like everybody else hoping to grace the world with the “perfect wall” solution, I was off to the drawing board (again).Our office has done a few projects with single-stud walls wrapped in multiple layers of rigid polyisocyanurate foam, and we got quite a bit of feedback from our builders that the assemblies were time-consuming and a bit fussy. Lots of cutting and fitting, long cap-nails required to hold the water-resistive barrier (WRB) in place, and the need for fairly substantial furring to meet the nail holding requirements of most sidings. Regardless, I likely would have pursued this route with my own house, rationalizing that the form was simple and thus it wouldn’t cost much — but then I stumbled onto nailbase panels.Nailbase panels are a product offered by many SIP manufacturers, and they are available in numerous specified thicknesses of EPS foam with a layer of 7/16” OSB bonded to one side only. Usually marketed as a retrofit product, we got to thinking about their potential for new construction.Since we are essentially eliminating the structural component from the SIP, we amuse ourselves in the office by calling them IPs. I never personally cared much for SIP construction because the reliance on glue to hold the whole works together leaves me feeling uneasy. Also, the effort to run electrical and other services in the exterior walls seemed overly complicated. In contrast, the IPs come in 4’ x 8’ sheets, with notches on every panel edge for an OSB spline to connect adjoining panels. There is no internal or panel edge framing. You simply cut them to size, apply sealant to the edges and screw them to the framed structural wall.The following are some things I like about the IP wall:The ability to cut the IPs to size on site allows for easy changes and adjustments that SIPs don’t.Attaching them to the outside of a framed structural wall makes framing the house walls easy, lets me utilize my exterior structural sheathing as the assembly’s air barrier.Keeps the structural sheathing on the warm side of the wall (unlike double-stud walls).Leaves the interior wall cavity open for whatever you want to stuff into it.With the structural sheathing as the air barrier on the exterior side of the wall cavity I also don’t need to mess with airtight boxes or excessive sealants at mechanical and electrical penetrations at the interior.The premium grade OSB that SIP manufacturers use makes furring and/or siding attachment simple.A few of my reservations about the IPs are:Uses a lot of foamThey make a mess when cutting with power tools.With the 8-inch nailbase panel you get an R-29. That alone would meet code in our climate even if I chose to leave the framed wall cavity empty. I chose to fill the cavities with dense-packed cellulose because I wanted the additional R-value and the cellulose installer will be on site to do the attic insulation anyway. I may also decide to insulate the cavities with fiberglass batts myself, and the consequences of a “do-it-yourself” quality job will be minimized by the continuous exterior insulation.With my sheathing nestled within the wall’s thermal boundary, the ratio of exterior to interior insulation is 1.38 (29/21), which is safely above the 0.7 minimum that the IECC calls for to allow a Class III vapor retarder to be used. Thus, my interior vapor retarder will be two layers of standard latex paint on the interior side of all exterior walls. I considered, for a time, that maybe I should still install a polyamide (“smart”) vapor retarder on the warm side, but at the end of the day I convinced myself that it isn’t necessary.I am the kind of person who might cut into my walls in a few years to see how the sheathing looks. When I do, I’ll send in the report. For now, we are going full speed ahead to enclose the structure before the deep Minnesota snow falls. I have already made a few concessions to keep the builder happy, so look forward to those in the next installment. I am an architect. I have spent the last five years thinking about, sketching, drafting, changing, overanalyzing, second guessing, and fretting about the house that my partner Catherine and I would someday build on our rural land in northern Minnesota. This is probably not unlike the experience of many non-architect dreamers, but the difference is that I am armed with AutoCAD and REMDesign energy modeling software to analyze every conceivable scenario.I also like building science. The firm that I work for, Wagner Zaun Architecture, encourages me to learn and think hard about many aspects of building performance, durability, cost effectiveness, and efficiency, and how they all relate to design and aesthetics. This, as many of you will attest, leads to more questions… and fear. If I push the thermal performance, will I compost my walls? The energy model says 12,000 BTU/h is my peak load: Is that really enough? Will the builder laugh at my “brilliant” flashing detail that took me three hours to draw?Despite my background, I am burdened with the same issues that all other dreamers are. I have a not-quite-big-enough budget. I want a house that is not too big and not too small. I want an energy-efficient house with passive solar features that doesn’t look like the awkward love-child of the Saskatchewan Conservation House and an Earthship. I want a house that is beautiful and durable. I want a house that is environmentally sensitive and responsible. I want a house that enters into a conversation with our land, not one that holds dominion over it. I want a house that I will love. A single-story house with a slab-on-grade foundationOn October 12, 2015, the rubber hit the road and we started construction. I can’t endlessly tweak (fuss over) plans and details any longer. The bank owns my soul, and the excavator is on site making a house-shaped scar on our previously pristine site.This installment is an explanation of the concepts employed in the design of our dream house, with reflection on some of the choices and struggles. This will be followed with future ruminations on progress, lessons learned, and concessions made in the face of reality.The “final” design is a one-story, slab-on-grade house (see Images #2 and #3, below). It is a two-bedroom, 1 1/2-bath home with an additional small office for farm operations. The main house is 1,668 gross square feet (1,575 conditioned square feet) with an additional 250 square foot screened porch.As I said, I am a building science nerd, so I’ll cut to the quick. The stats for the house are as follows:Climate Zone 7, with 9,500 HDD and 250 CDDA dead-flat site with good solar exposureUnder slab insulation: a continuous horizontal layer (8 inches) of Type IX EPS (R-35)Walls: 2×6 framed structural cavity wall with R-21 dense-packed cellulose or fiberglass batts, with the structural Zip sheathing serving as an air barrier, and 7 3/8-inch EPS nailbase panels on the exterior (R-29) for a total of R-50Ceiling: Engineered roof trusses with 20-inch-deep energy heel and 24 inches of blown cellulose (R-80)Windows: Duxton Fiberglass windows with 1 3/8-inch triple-pane IGUs with argon gas fill and Cardinal 180 coatings on surfaces #2 and #5; center-of-glass specs: U-factor = 0.13; SHGC = 0.56, VT = 70%Airtightness target: 1 ach50 or lessThe design goal for the house was to take full advantage of the good solar exposure and to reduce the mechanical load to a level where a minisplit heat pump would take care of the majority of my heating needs. Although we have very few cooling degree days, the notion of air conditioning and humidity control is appealing to me, which also prompted the desire to use a minisplit.I wanted to have an all-electric house so that I could eventually offset the majority, if not all of my consumption with photovoltaic (PV) panels. Aside from a propane cooktop (one of the few requests from my very patient partner), which will be fed from a 100-gallon propane bottle, the house will be entirely electric. Although our region’s current electrical grid supply is very coal-dependent and propane is cheaper, I rationalized that I am reducing my load to a point that I can easily offset it with PV later, and I won’t be reliant on a propane delivery truck. Also, I am more afraid of gas than electricity, which may not be totally rational, but I am calling the shots. Elden Lindamood is an architect with Wagner Zaun Architecture in Duluth, Minnesota.center_img A frost-protected shallow foundationThe first item I grappled with was the foundation. I initially wanted a frost-depth stem wall (which is 5’-0” below grade here) just because it “felt right.” However, in the face of incremental cost increases and above-grade wall changes discussed below, I eventually arrived at a frost-protected shallow foundation.Another factor influencing the choice was the very high water table on our site. I have dug many post holes on the site that fill up with water three feet down.Once construction started, we discovered that creating the foundation forms with foam is fairly time-consuming (see Image #1 at the top of the page), and for future projects I want to look into a flat structural slab sitting in a simpler tub of foam. They might require a thicker slab with more steel, but the labor savings might be better than the additional cost to form a thickened-edge slab. RELATED ARTICLES A Superinsulated House in Rural Minnesota Q&A: How risky is a single layer nailbase SIP over a single stud wall with sealed sheathing? Frost-Protected Shallow Foundations Heating and cooling provided by a ducted minisplitThe mechanicals are as follows:Heating/cooling: Ducted Fujitsu 12RLFCD minisplit heat pump, single zone; backup consists of 6 electric radiant cove panels with individual thermostatic controls, totaling 3,450 watts; a small wood stove in the center of the houseDomestic hot water: 50 gallon electric-resistance Marathon storage tank water heaterElectric clothes dryer with through-the-wall exhaustElectric oven with a propane cooktop and a range hood rated at less than 300 cfm; makeup air unit with 1000-watt electric resistance heater tied to the range hood and clothes dryerVenmar E15 HRV, exhausting bathrooms and near kitchen, and supplying into the minisplit supply ducts.I intend to monitor the electrical usage on the main house feed along with the individual radiant cove circuits to determine how often they kick on and under what conditions. We also have 30 acres of poplar woods to feed the woodstove. Poplar isn’t great firewood, but it is free and I’ll have more than enough deadfall to keep us warm after the energy apocalypse.last_img read more

1 paisa loan waiver a cruel joke: farmer

first_imgChiddi Sharma, a farmer in Ading village of Mathura, has received 1 paisa or ₹00.01 as part of the U.P. government’s flagship crop loan waiver scheme, which promises a relief of up to ₹1 lakh to the 86 lakh farmers in the State. Mr. Sharma, one of the many farmers who have been given waivers of minuscule amounts, says his is the “cruellest joke” as no one in the State has been paid 1 paise as relief for losses running into lakhs.‘Blessing for farmers’Announced in April this year, a month after Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath came to power in U.P., the ₹36,000-crore ‘Rin Mochan Yojana’ had come as a blessing for debt-ridden farmers of the State. Even as the Adityanath government competed six months, Mr. Sharma got a message on his phone from Punjab National Bank on Sunday that he had got a loan waiver of 1 paisa as part of the flagship scheme.When The Hindu met the 52-year-old farmer in his humble one-room house,Mr. Sharma was visibly angry. “I had distributed sweets in April when Yogiji announced the loan waiver. I had taken loan of ₹1.55 lakh from the Punjab National Bank six years ago, but could not repay it that due to repeated losses in farming. Today I do not know whether to laugh or cry. Many leaders have played with the emotions of the farmers, but this one by Yogiji is the cruellest of them all,” said Mr. Sharma who owns five bighas of land and comes under the category of “marginal farmer”. Waiver certificate“Since the day Yogiji announced the ₹1-lakh loan waiver scheme, I had only been thinking about it. I don’t know what to say now. The six-month wait has resulted in 1 paisa in my account,” Mr. Sharma said, waving the loan waiver certificate embossed with the photos of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chief Minister Adityanath, with the slogan “har kadam kisanon ke saath (with farmers in their every step)” running under them.“I don’t want to speak much but what is the point of advertising ₹36000 crore. How come other farmers in Mathura who took almost the same amount as me and who were in a similar situation, got the full waiver of ₹1 lakh,” asked Mr. Sharma, flanked by his son Banwarilal Sharma and his two sons. Since the news of 1-paisa loan waiver broke, Mr. Sharma has been receiving hordes of journalists and photographers at his home.The media attention is also proving to be a pocket pinch for the family, said Banwarilal Sharma who had spent over ₹100 on tea and snacks for the reporters visiting them.Opposition fumesWhile there are many beneficiaries of the loan waiver scheme who have got a relief as low as 40 paisa, no one else in the State has a certificate that matches the 1-paisa laon waiver to Mr. Sharma. His case has already given ammunition to the Opposition leaders in the State. Former Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav tweeted on Monday: “Bhool chukey jo apna sankalp patra, shweta patra unka bahana hai (The white paper is an excuse for those who have forgotten their poll promises)”.Two-account theoryThe district manager of PNB bank, P.K. Singh, said that a case like that of Chiddi Sharma may have happened because of two accounts in the same bank. “Under the scheme those accounts of farmers ended up getting selected in which the money was either repaid or there was a meagre loan amount left,” said Mr. Singh. But Mr. Sharma said he never had two accounts in PNB, so there was no chance of any confusion. Probe orderedThe district officials of Mathura have ordered a probe into Mr. Sharma’s case. ADM Mathura Sadanand Gupta told Mr. Sharma that it was a mistake on part of PNB and directed the bank officials to issue a new certificate. The District Magistrate of Mathura, Arvind Malappa, told The Hindu, “I looked at the case of of Chiddi Sharma and it seems that it happened due to some technical error which we are trying to sort out.”last_img read more

Gujarat police constable exam cancelled after question paper leak

first_imgOver 8.75 lakh applicants in Gujarat who were set to take exam for 9,713 unarmed police constable jobs were in for a shock when the exam was cancelled hours before scheduled time as the question paper was allegedly found to be leaked. Chief Minister Vijay Rupani has ordered probe in the matter.The exam was scheduled to start at 3 p.m. on Sunday in 2440 centres across the State. However, the written examination was called off barely a few hours before it was scheduled to start after it surfaced that the question paper was leaked, said Vikas Sahay, chairman of the Lokrakshak Recruitment Board, the body that conducts recruitment for constables in the State.“Questions and answers started circulating on some social media before the exam was to begin,” Mr. Sahay told media persons in Gandhinagar.Mr. Sahay said the exam will most probably be conducted again within a month.“Chief Minister ordered probe immediately after he learnt about the leak of exam paper. He also said that the State government will provide free transportation to the applicants during the exam when it is held,” a CMO press release stated.last_img read more

PHOTOS: Health Minister Encourages Healthy Lifestyle

first_imgPresident, Healthy Caribbean Coalition, Sir Trevor Hassell, makes presentation at the Healthy Caribbean Coalition’s Caribbean Non-communicable Disease Forum, held at The Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston, on Monday (April 23). Minister of Health, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton (right), speaks with (from left): President, Healthy Caribbean Coalition, Sir Trevor Hassell; Director, Non-Communicable Diseases and Injury Prevention, Ministry of Health, Dr. Tamu Davidson, and Acting Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Jacqueline McKenzie, at the Healthy Caribbean Coalition’s Caribbean Non-communicable Disease Forum, held at The Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston, on Monday (April 23).last_img read more