Harry Maguire: Manchester United defender says criticism of club stems from jealousy | Football News

first_imgMaguire is one of the players who has found himself on the end of criticism having so far failed to live up to his status as the world’s most expensive defender following his £85m move from Leicester in the summer of 2019.However, he was praised by Solskjaer for his performance in the win at Everton, which was achieved thanks to two goals from Bruno Fernandes who, in contrast, has had no problems in excelling since his January arrival from Sporting Lisbon.“I thought Harry’s performance was top against – for me – one of the best in the world at aerial play, (Dominic) Calvert-Lewin, with his timing in the air, his jump, his spring and his athleticism,” said the United boss.“And I thought we as a backline defended really well against him. Very pleased with Harry and the rest of them back there.”Solskjaer: We were set up to fail at GoodisonOle Gunnar Solskjaer heavily criticised the Premier League’s scheduling after his side’s 3-1 win at Everton on Saturday lunchtime, claiming his side “were set up to fail”.United travelled to Istanbul Basaksehir for a Champions League group stage clash on Wednesday – a game they lost 2-1 – before having to face a refreshed Everton at Goodison Park in the weekend’s early kick-off.And despite his team coming from behind to claim all three points, the Norwegian still hit out at what he called the “absolute joke” schedule his players were faced with after Luke Shaw (hamstring), Victor Lindelof (back) and Marcus Rashford (shoulder) all picked up injuries.“How can you expect players to perform to the best of their ability when you send them out at 12.30pm? Absolute joke,” said Solskjaer.“A month ago we tried to move this game. What sense is there for us to play on a Saturday when we could play on the Sunday and there is an international break afterwards?” Ole Gunnar Solskjaer says the quick turnaround from United’s Champions League tie on Wednesday affected their performance against Everton – Advertisement – Solskjaer will be concerned by Manchester United’s inconsistency in performance levels, says former player Lee Sharpe preview image 0:59 3:24 “Why? Because we are the biggest club in the world. People don’t want us to do well. Why? Probably because of the success we’ve had in the past.“We have to live up to that, we have to react to it and don’t let the negatives get into our bubble inside the training ground. Sometimes it is difficult for the lads.” Speaking after the match in a video posted on Manchester United’s Twitter feed the England international added: “We reacted well to two poor results. We felt we were on the right track after Leipzig (a 5-0 win) and we let ourselves down against Arsenal (last Sunday).“It wasn’t good enough as a performance. In the week again we gave them a soft goal and found it too hard to create chances to come back.“We knew this was an important game to get three points. We reacted well but it is only a start.” Manchester United captain Harry Maguire believes criticism which is often so quickly levelled at the club is rooted in jealousy.Some of the pressure which was building on Ole Gunnar Solskjaer after two defeats in four days – including the Champions League embarrassment against Istanbul Basaksehir – was lifted with a 3-1 win at Everton.- Advertisement – Victory avoided the ignominy of United’s worst start to a league season since 1989-90 and gave their manager some breathing space after coming under increasing scrutiny but three wins in seven league matches still leaves the club in the bottom half of the table.Maguire admits it is sometimes difficult to ignore the criticism but felt the performance at Goodison Park gave them something to build on after the international break. “At this club one thing I’ve noticed in my time here – I’ve been here a year and a half – is we are the most talked-about club in the world,” he said.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Jordan Pickford and Harry Maguire have words after the Everton goalkeeper kicked the Manchester United captain but avoided VAR actionImage:Jordan Pickford and Harry Maguire have words after the Everton goalkeeper kicked the Manchester United captain but avoided VAR actionlast_img read more

Tennis trio headed to USTA Nationals

first_img Taylor VorthermsSports Editor at The Ellsworth AmericanTaylor Vortherms covers sports in Hancock County. The St. Louis, Missouri native recently graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and joined The Ellsworth American in 2013. Bio EHS names new boys’ soccer coach – July 13, 2016 Latest Posts Part 2: When the injury is inside your head, some “don’t get it” – July 26, 2016center_img Latest posts by Taylor Vortherms (see all) ELLSWORTH — Alan Toothaker is living his dream — a dream likely shared among tennis players across the country and maybe, after this winter, some snow-loathing Maine residents.Later this month, the 54-year-old veterinarian will travel to balmy Indian Wells, Calif., with his two teammates, Ben Beverly and Phid Lawless, to compete on the same courts as the professionals in the United States Tennis Association’s tri-level national championships.And while the three players will not be slamming down aces against Roger Federer, they’ll get to watch the Swiss pro compete in the BNP Paribas Open, which will take place each day before their own USTA matches from March 20-22.“Roger Federer could be playing on a court, and we might be scheduled to go on right after him,” said Toothaker, who also is the team’s captain. “I think anyone playing USTA tennis would tell you that’s the goal — to get to nationals.”This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textThe tournament merges the worlds of amateur players with the pros. They are even united on a 10-point spectrum from ratings of 2.5 to 7.0 — novice to world-class professional. Toothaker’s team falls somewhere in the middle at 4.0.The trio, which rotates as a doubles team, advanced to the national stage by notching both state and New England titles in the 4.0 age 18+ division. At the tri-level, Toothaker, Beverly and Lawless will compete as a unit along with New England’s 3.5 and 4.5-rated champions. The three teams, which have never met each other, will represent the region — one of 17 in the country.Toothaker has never before made it to nationals, but in a sport where success is measured in the quantity of T-shirts won, his dresser drawers are filled to the brim.“It’s all about the T-shirts,” Toothaker said. “Because that’s basically what you end up winning: more and more shirts.”But the root of Toothaker’s love for the sport stretches beyond his enthusiasm for cotton tees. The Ellsworth native grew up playing tennis with his father on the only court once available in town: a private facility owned by a late tennis aficionado, Roger Willey.Toothaker shifted to the Ellsworth Tennis Center (ETC) in 2001 once Susan Scherbel’s recreational complex — four indoor and two outdoor courts — was built off of Downeast Highway. Since then, Toothaker, Beverly and Lawless have been practicing there together every Monday night.“It’s the nicest tennis center in the state,” Toothaker said. “And we get the advantage of using it.”Alan Toothaker returns the ball backhand in a match at the Ellsworth Tennis Center in a Monday night practice.The tennis gene didn’t skip a generation with the Toothakers. His two sons — now adults — also frequent ETC and accompany their dad every summer to New York to watch the U.S. Open — a family tradition dating back to their childhood.“The first year I took my kids, they spent the entire time chasing down Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer,” Toothaker said. “They have autographed tennis balls galore.”Toothaker, owner of Ellsworth’s Small Animal Clinic, has never experienced a demand for his signature on any Wilson-branded balls. But he didn’t miss an opportunity to play the role of a celebrity athlete when Beverly walked into the ETC lobby before Monday night’s practice.“Ben, come over and get your interview in,” Toothaker called out to the Ellsworth carpenter. “It’s time to be a star.”At 35 years old, Beverly is nearly half the age of 65-year-old teammate and veteran player Lawless, who lives in Sullivan and owns a concrete planter-manufacturing business called Lunaform.Their ages don’t seem to concern Toothaker, even in a division shared with opponents not yet legally old enough to drink alcohol.“If they’ve been playing at all, they know looks are deceiving,” Toothaker said of his much younger competitors.At the USTA New England championships held centrally in Springfield, Mass., the three men beat a team of two 18-year-olds and a 19-year-old from Connecticut in the 4.0 finals for the regional title.“If you can play smarter, you can usually outfox them,” Toothaker said.“That’s what we definitely have to hope for,” he added in a serious tone before breaking into laughter.In just more than two weeks, Toothaker’s team will step into one of the world’s largest tennis stadiums and perform in front of tens of thousands of spectators. And whether those fans will be there to see Federer or Hancock Country’s own tennis trio won’t really matter to Toothaker under the Palm Springs sun.“We’ll basically get treated like the pros,” Toothaker said. “That’s the cool thing about going to nationals: They send you somewhere nice, treat you really well…“Plus, you get way better T-shirts.” Part 1: Invisible, incapacitating concussions are sidelining high school athletes – July 19, 2016last_img read more