Transfer rumours and paper review – Thursday, August 20

first_imgHere’s the top transfer-related stories in Thursday’s newspapers…Telephone conversations with José Mourinho and Cesc Fàbregas persuaded the Barcelona forward Pedro Rodríguez to snub long-standing interest from Manchester United and move instead to Chelsea in a deal that will be worth £21.2m. (Guardian)Manchester City are a step closer to completing the £32million transfer of Valencia central defender Nicolas Otamendi. It is understood that the Argentine stopper has undergone his medical in Manchester and agreed terms on a five-year contract. (Daily Mail)Bayern Munich have slammed the door on Manchester United’s hopes of signing German World Cup winning striker Thomas Muller. United had reportedly lodged a £60m bid for the 25-year-old but Bayern insist he will not be sold at any price. (Manchester Evening News)Southampton face a fight to hold to another two of their top stars with Tottenham targeting Victor Wanyama and Manchester United interested in Sadio Mane. (Daily Mirror)West Ham have had a £3.5million bid for Galatasaray striker Burak Yilmaz turned down. (Daily Mirror)West Ham have also pulled out of a surprise deal to sign Emmanuel Adebayor from Tottenham Hotspur. (Daily Telegraph)Everton have agreed a £5.5m fee for River Plate defender Ramiro Funes Mori. (Liverpool Echo)Liverpool will not consider bids for defender Mamadou Sakho – despite the Frenchman’s unrest at being axed from the squad. (Daily Mirror)West Brom are ploughing on with their bid to sign Tottenham defender Federico Fazio, despite snubbing Spurs’ opening bid for Saido Berahino. (Daily Mirror)Sunderland winger Emanuele Giaccherini is a target for Bologna. The 30-year-old, who joined for £6.5million two years ago, is set to decide his future in the next 48 hours with Sunderland willing to sell to fund other moves. (Daily Mail)Shaun Maloney is expected to join Hull from Chicago Fire in the next 48 hours. (Daily Mail)Wolves have rejected a bid from Norwich City for striker Benik Afobe. (Daily Mail)And here’s the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…Reports: Manchester United table £60m bid for Germany striker Thomas MullerBayer Leverkusen want Liverpool defender Mamadou Sakho in £7m dealJulian Draxler latest – Juventus offer £21m to land long-term Arsenal targetSunderland star Emanuele Giaccherini could leave the Stadium of Light, reveals agentManchester United stunned as Chelsea win race for Barcelona winger PedroBenzema breakthough! Arsenal have £48m bid accepted by Real Madrid, talkSPORT toldEverton to move for Inter Milan defender if John Stones completes Chelsea switchDavid De Gea told by teammate to stay at Manchester UnitedReal Madrid join Chelsea in eyeing Brazilian defender Alex Telleslast_img read more

Krita 4 released digital painting program

first_imgKrita 4 released: digital painting program by Mike Turcotte-McCusker on March 30, 2018 in Linux – Last Update: March 31, 2018 – 5 commentsKrita is a well known digital painting program, available for Windows Mac and Linux, but is primarily known for its Linux side.On March 22, Krita 4.0 was released, which features some pretty big (and in my opinion, overdue) changes.InstallationMost major distributions carry Krita in their repositories, so installing it for your preferred system shouldn’t be too hard; no need to get too detailed on this part, although I will give some info from the Krita website, for Gentoo users:“There is an overlay for Gentoo with the latest version of Krita, maintained by a volunteer in the Krita community: “layman -a bloody && emerge –sync && emerge krita”Also, Krita is available as an AppImage, and also as a Flatpak, so again, installation should be no issue.Krita 4 FeaturesOne of the main features in this new release, is support for SVG filetype vector images. Previously, Krita had been using ODG files, which are not very widely compatible, and made using Krita a bit of a pain if you had intention of working with Inkscape as well.On top of that, Krita 4.0 boasts a number of new features such as:UX ImprovementsNew text toolPython ScriptingColourize Mask ToolBackground SavingNew Palette with significant better functionalityBrush Editor Improvements & Live PreviewMultithreaded BrushesPixel GridIsometric GridsMy experienceI found Krita 4 to be pretty awesome to work with actually, in conjunction with a new drawing tablet I got as a gift from a friend of mine.Part of the issue with why I haven’t used Krita in the past, is the lack of proper SVG support, and so bringing that forward now with version 4.0, I’ve enjoyed messing around a fair bit, and may actually consider Krita a contender for my art needs.It might just be placebo, but I did seem to notice Krita booting up faster, and overall functioning faster than I recall in the past, so that was positive to note as well.The addition of background saving, was also absolutely critical, as Krita had a very annoying system before that left it unusable while it autosaved. This was long overdue, and I am extremely happy it’s been changed.Now you: What are your thoughts on the new features? Will this entice you to use Krita more? Let us know in the comments!Related articlesA Look at Desktop Environments: KDE 5 PlasmaA look at Windows Alternatives in LinuxEssential Applications for GNU/Linux UsersTools for GNU/Linux: Third party screenshot utilitiesSummaryArticle NameKrita 4 released: digital painting programDescriptionKrita is a well known digital painting program, available for Windows Mac and Linux, but is primarily known for its Linux side. On March 22, Krita 4.0 was released, which features some pretty big (and in my opinion, overdue) changes.Author Mike TurcottePublisher Ghacks Technology NewsLogo Advertisementlast_img read more

Study 70000 opioidrelated deaths not reported owing to incomplete death certificates

first_imgJun 27 2018Several states are likely dramatically underestimating the effect of opioid-related deaths because of incomplete death certificate reporting, with Pennsylvania leading the pack, according to a new analysis by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.The study, published today in Public Health Reports, the journal of the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General, found that potentially 70,000 opioid-related overdose deaths were not included in national opioid-related mortality estimates since 1999 because coroners and medical examiners did not specify the drug that contributed to the cause of death when completing the death certificates.”Proper allocation of resources for the opioid epidemic depends on understanding the magnitude of the problem,” said lead author Jeanine M. Buchanich, Ph.D., research associate professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Biostatistics. “Incomplete death certificate reporting hampers the efforts of lawmakers, treatment specialists and public health officials. And the large differences we found between states in the completeness of opioid-related overdose mortality reporting makes it more difficult to identify geographic regions most at risk.”In the U.S., cause of death codes are assigned by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) using information reported by the coroner or medical examiner completing the death certificate. Drug-specific overdose deaths are identified by the contributory causes of death, which are categorized as “T codes” and are assigned based on the specific drugs recorded by the coroner or medical examiner completing the death certificate. A code of T50.9 means “other and unspecified drugs, medicaments and biological substances.”Buchanich and her team extracted death data by state for 1999 through 2015 from the NCHS’s Mortality Multiple Cause Micro-data Files. They grouped overdose deaths into opioid-related, non-opioid-related and unspecified codes, and calculated the change in percentage of overdose deaths that fell into each category from 1999 to 2015 by state. This allowed the researchers to extrapolate how many of the unspecified overdose deaths were likely opioid-related.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysIn those 17 years, opioid-related overdose deaths rose 401 percent, non-opioid-related overdose deaths rose 150 percent and unspecified overdose deaths rose 220 percent. In five states – Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi and Pennsylvania – more than 35 percent of the overdose deaths were coded as unspecified.The variability among states not reporting specific drugs during this time period was tremendous – ranging from fewer than 10 unspecified overdose deaths in Vermont to 11,152 in Pennsylvania. States with a decentralized county coroner system or with a hybrid system that involved county coroners and state medical examiners, were likely to have a higher proportion of overdose deaths with unspecified drug codes.”Multiple organizations have advocated for more accurate drug reporting on death certificates,” said Buchanich. “But coroners are less likely to be physicians and do not necessarily have medical training useful for completing drug information for death certificates based on toxicology reports. And states with a decentralized or hybrid system are likely to have less standardization, leading to greater variation in reporting accuracy.”Several states have made extensive efforts to improve reporting. In Kentucky, for example, opioid-related drug codes increased 43 percent from 1999 through 2015, and unspecified drug reporting decreased 28 percent. This suggests that state-based efforts can be instrumental in improving the accuracy of drug-specific reporting for overdose deaths, Buchanich said.Several assumptions – primarily that the proportion of known opioid-related deaths would be the same for those that were unspecified by state by year – were made in performing this analysis, Buchanich said. Future research should more fully evaluate these assumptions and also examine other factors, such as potential biases, that could lead coroners and medical examiners to use an unspecified versus specific drug code on death certificates. Source:http://www.upmc.com/media/NewsReleases/2018/Pages/buchanich-death-certs.aspxlast_img read more