West Point Shooting Investigation Report Now Before the President

first_imgThe Minister of Information, Culture and Tourism, Lewis G. Brown,  has disclosed that the Board of Inquiry set up to investigate the death of little Shaki Kamara has finally submitted the report to the President through the Minister of National Defense, Brownie Samukai.Speaking at the Ministry’s weekly press briefing yesterday on Capitol Hill in Monrovia, Minister Brown said the report contained appropriate recommendations and facts relating to the death of Shaki Kamara during the West Point’s riot with state security.According to the government spokesman, the President, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf will consider all the recommendations and facts of the report and have it published.“We are convinced that all the recommendations and facts are available in the report of Shaki Kamara’s death, submitted by the Board of Inquiry, who have properly handled the process with care and concerned.”The President, Minister Brown said, has promised keenly to review the report, especially the recommendations and facts provided by the Board of Inquiry.“We want to assure the public that in the shortest  possible time the report of late Shaki Kamara will be released, including the cause of his death and the recommendations made by the Board,” Minister Brown said.He explained that, the report was made available to the President through the office of the Defense Minister, who is also member of the Board of Inquiry on the death of young Kamara, which occurred on August 20, 2014.According to Mr. Browne,  the report contained the facts, which led to the shooting incident in West Point on August 20 by state security, and established all the possible recommendations.Meanwhile, Minister Brown has disclosed that at the end of September,  the Liberia National Police (LNP) and the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization (BIN)  will replace the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) at all borders and checkpoints.He explained that, “The Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) will complete its  withdrawal by the 30th of September from all the checkpoints.  They will be replaced at the border points by BIN officers and other places by our LNP officers.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Tottenham midfielder wants Premier League stay if put up for sale

first_imgMoussa Sissoko would prefer to stay in the Premier League if he is forced to leave Tottenham this summer.The France international joined Spurs a year ago from Newcastle for £30m but he flopped during his first season in London.Speculation is now growing that Tottenham are ready to show the midfielder the door and clubs in France are interested.Marseille are particularly keen on Sissoko and they can offer him regular first-team football ahead of next year’s World Cup in Russia.But, according to Foot Mercato, the 27-year-old would prefer to join a Premier League club if he is forced to leave Tottenham this summer.Sissoko has spent the past four years in England after joining Newcastle from Toulouse in 2013 and he would prefer to continue his career where he is rather than return to France. 1 Moussa Sissoko last_img read more

What the Sharks’ plan might be for Lean Bergmann and Danil Yurtaykin

first_imgSAN JOSE — After the return of Evander Kane last week and Marcus Sorensen earlier this week, the Sharks at the moment have a full complement of forwards available and ready to play for the first time this season.On Wednesday night against the Carolina Hurricanes, that meant that rookies Lean Bergmann and Danil Yurtaykin were healthy scratches. And since the Sharks beat the Hurricanes 5-2, they may not make any lineup changes for Saturday’s home game against the Buffalo Sabres.So, as long as …last_img read more

Ohio Crop Tour follow-up

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest To follow up on our I-75/I-71 Ohio Crop Tour, we got some of the actual yields from the fields we sampled in August. Below you can see how well (or how poorly) we did with our yield estimates.County, Actual yield, Crop tour estimate in AugustCrawford: 240, 231Darke: 164, 217Delaware: 168, 204Defiance: 105, 113Fairfield: 171, 175Franklin Co.: 176, 146Hancock: 220, 200Henry: 158, 159Highland: 179, 210Madison: 228, 186Medina: 150, 160Miami: 202, 190Paulding: 90, 70Pickaway: 220, 235Preble: 200, 234Putnam: 96, 119Ross: 205, 203Wood: 117, 136Wyandot: 195, 186Van Wert: 110, 98The combined numerical tour average was 175 bushels on the August crop tour. The formula used is accurate plus or minus 30 bushels for the areas of the fields sampled. The terrible conditions in northwest Ohio, we believed, would pull down the total average of the state, however. The group consensus in August was 166 bushels for a 2015 state average based on what we saw with extremely poor conditions in so much of northwest Ohio and many unseen holes in fields from early wet conditions throughout the state. We didn’t not reduce the yield enough, however. Ohio’s final 2015 average corn yield (released Jan. 12) was 153 bushels per acre, down 23 bushels from last year. The USDA’s final national average corn yield is 168.4 for 2015.last_img read more

Reindeer facts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Reindeer have feet like snowshoes, antlers like a rocking chair, and connections in story and song to Santa Claus.But they don’t live wild in Ohio.Neither do caribou, which belong to the same species (see No. 2 below).And Marne Titchenell — who’s a wildlife program specialist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University — hasn’t even seen them in Alaska.“I went there a couple of years ago,” she said. “I thought I had a good chance, considering there are more caribou there than people. But no dice.“I’ve had to rely on the ones I’ve seen at the Columbus Zoo.”Titchenell has a sleighful of experience, however, with a reindeer and caribou relative.White-tailed deer live in all 88 of Ohio’s counties, have reached nuisance levels in some cities, and part of her job is teaching workshops that show people ways to deal with them.There’s a tiny bit of good news, she said: “I can confidently say, with the backing of the scientific community, that white-tailed deer can’t fly.”She’s less firm when it comes to reindeer. “I’ve never seen one fly,” she said. “But I keep looking.”Especially Dec. 24.Confirmed reindeer facts include the following:1. Reindeer used to be Buckeyes.Once upon a time, about, hmmm, at least 10,000 years ago — until the end of the Pleistocene Ice Age — reindeer lived in the area that became Ohio.Paleontologists have found reindeer fossils in the Buckeye State and Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina and West Virginia, among others.2. Reindeer are the same things as caribou. In general. But maybe, somewhat, not.Reindeer and caribou belong to the same species, which is Rangifer tarandus. In general, people use “caribou” in North America, “reindeer” in Europe and Asia.“Caribou” also tends to refer to the larger, wild R. tarandus types, like the ones in Canada and Alaska, while “reindeer” often, but not always, means the slightly smaller, domesticated kinds, like many of the ones in Scandinavia.Scientists say in all, there are 14 R. tarandus subspecies and at least four domesticated breeds.A 2013 study complicates matters. Based on DNA analysis, the study suggested that reindeer/caribou should be in two groups. One group is the caribou in southern Canada. The other group is the caribou in Alaska and northern Canada plus the reindeer in Europe and Asia.The scientists who did the study said the Ice Age split the two groups apart about 200,000 years ago, and their genes and adaptations to their environment, including to changing climates, are somewhat different because of it.3. Reindeer are deer.Reindeer are members of the Cervidae, or deer, family. The Cervidae family, to name a few, includes elk, moose and Ohio’s white-tailed deer.4. Reindeer do go click, click, click.Reindeer make a clicking sound when they walk, and not just when up on a housetop. Tendons snap over sesamoid bones in their feet, and that’s what makes the click.Experts think the clicking helps the members of a herd stay in contact, especially in snowstorms or, say, when it’s foggy.5. Reindeer also vocalize.Reindeer cows grunt to their calves. Calves bleat and bawl to their mothers. Males snort, hoot, bellow and rattle hoarsely when trying to attract a mate. A special inflatable air sac in the neck gives the calls of the males extra oomph.6. When a reindeer senses danger, it may sniff, listen, stare, urinate, “wheeze-snort,” rear up and jump in the air like a stallion, then run away, often in that order.Scientists call the rearing up and jumping an “excitation leap.” It’s a visual warning to other reindeer. It could mean there’s a predator coming, like a wolf, a bear or a fearsome, toothy, bounceable biped you could even describe as abominable.7. There’s a reason a reindeer can have a red nose — at least on the inside. And it’s gross.Flies called reindeer nose bot flies may deposit their larvae in a reindeer’s nostrils. The larvae then grow in the throat or sinuses. One of the results can be inflammation. But you couldn’t really say the nose glows. The reindeer sneezes them out in spring.8. A reindeer runs faster than a grandma.A reindeer can run at speeds of up to 48 miles per hour. A grandma walking home from someone’s house Christmas Eve, or any other day, averages about 3 miles per hour. If both the reindeer and grandma were traveling in the same direction and following the same path, the grandma indeed and unfortunately would get run over by the reindeer.Even Olympic gold-medal-winning sprinter Elaine Thompson, who’s capable of about 21 miles per hour over 100 meters, would have hoof prints.9. “Up on the House Top” — and its composer’s house — have histories in Ohio.Finally, there’s a reindeer tie to Ohio in music. Benjamin Hanby — who was born in Rushville, lived in Westerville and went to Otterbein University — composed “Up on the House Top” in 1864. According to its Wikipedia entry, the song is “considered the first Yuletide song focused primarily on Santa Claus” — and his four-footed, foot-clicking helpers.Hanby was a minister, abolitionist and helped with the Underground Railroad. Today, his Westerville home is preserved as the Hanby House State Memorial, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and is included in the National Park Service’s Network to Freedom of significant Underground Railroad sites.last_img read more

For love of print

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio showI welcomed the editor of Outdoor Life magazine, Anthony Licata, on my radio show recently and we had a frank discussion about the role of print in today’s outdoors media. My favorite of the former Big Three outdoor publications that included Sports Afield and Field & Steam recently went quarterly, meaning subscribers now receive their copies of Outdoor Life four times each year instead of monthly. When I inquired why, the main reason was reader interest, said Licata. He revealed that readers were asking for more narratives, or “Me and Joe”-type articles that tell a tale and take longer (read that: more space) to tell. The new issues are 100-plus pages long, and will, he said, contain plenty of such content.“For example,” he said, “an angler who wants to learn how to tie a Clouser fly now goes to You Tube to learn how” and doesn’t rely on magazines to offer such content. “We had to change with the times,” he added. “And we think we’ve taken the right path.”I hope Licata is right. I like nothing more than sitting down in my favorite easy chair with a magazine or newspaper in my lap for a relaxing read. That’s especially true of outdoor magazines.As an aside, my first hope of ever becoming an outdoor writer came from the pages of Outdoor Life the summer of 1966 when, at age 12, I discovered in its hallowed pages an article on fishing in Ohio titled “My Panfish on Light Tackle Kick.” When I noted it had been penned by a writer named Erwin Bauer who lived one suburban neighborhood over from mine, it was a watershed moment for me. I realized I didn’t have to live in Montana, Maine or Florida to make a living writing about the outdoors. If he could do it, so could I.One of the benefits of being married to a librarian, my wife last Christmas presented me with an original copy of that Outdoor Life issue, a gift I cherish. I didn’t ask if she located it in the classified section of a print magazine or online. 419er Archers Celebrate RangeA new archery range is now open at Maumee Bay State Park, located at 1400 State Park Road, Oregon. The entrance to the range is just past the park office on Park Road 1. On the range, archers will find seven shooting lanes with a combination of static bag targets and 3D targets. Use of the range is free, and the hours of operation are sunrise to sunset, seven days a week. Shooters are reminded that only field points are allowed, no broadheads.The construction of the range was completed through a partnership between the ODNR Division of Wildlife and the ODNR Division of Parks and Watercraft and was funded by Ohio hunting and fishing license sales and monies generated by the Pittman-Robertson Act. The Pittman-Robertson Act was enacted by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1937 and puts an 11% federal excise tax on sporting arms, handguns, ammunitions, bows and arrows.For more information on Ohio’s shooting sports opportunities, or to find a range near you, visit wildohio.gov. Click on the “Hunting, Trapping and Shooting Sports” tab, then click on “Shooting Ranges.” Beaver and otter trapping drawings heldOhio trappers are invited to participate in special drawings Saturday, Oct. 13, for public land beaver and river otter trapping opportunities. A list of public land trapping opportunities available at the lottery is posted at wildohio.gov under “Controlled Hunting and Trapping Events.” Interested trappers will be required to come to one of the five wildlife district offices, where registration begins at 11 a.m. and the drawing to begin at 12 p.m. For more detailed information, visit http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/stay-informed/news-announcements/post/public-drawings-offered-for-beaver-and-otter-trapping-opportunities-on-state-owned-or-managed-properties-2018 Fall turkey hunting counties increaseThanks to three counties being added — Erie, Hancock and Lucas — Ohio hunters can pursue wild turkeys in a record 70 counties this autumn during a six-week season that opens Saturday, Oct. 13 through Sunday, Nov. 25. Gobblers, poults and hens are legal game during the fall wild turkey season, but only one turkey of either sex may be harvested during the season. A valid Ohio hunting license and a fall turkey hunting permit are required to participate in the autumn opportunity that is open from 30 minutes before sunrise until sunset daily. Shotguns using shot, as well as crossbows and longbows, are permitted, and turkeys must be checked by 11:30 p.m. on the day the bird is harvested.Hunters must make their own game tag to attach to a turkey, and can use any material (cardboard, plastic, paper, etc.) as long as it contains the hunter’s name, date, time, and county of the kill. Go to the Turkey Hunting Resources page at wildohio.gov for more information on changes to the game check process.Also, all successful hunters must report their turkey harvest using the automated game-check system, which is available online and by phone seven days a week, including holidays. Hunters with a turkey permit have three options to complete the game check:Online at ohiogamecheck.com;Call 877-TAG-ITOH (824-4864); orVisit a license agent. A list of agents can be found at wildohio.gov or by calling 800-WILDLIFE (945-3543).Landowners exempt from purchasing a turkey permit, and others not required to purchase a turkey permit, cannot use the 877-TAG-ITOH option. Landowners and others not required to obtain a permit have the following game-check options:Online at ohiogamecheck.com;Visit a license agent; orCall 866-703-1928 for operator assisted landowner game-check (a convenience fee of $5.50 applies).The Division of Wildlife advises turkey hunters to wear hunter orange clothing when entering, leaving, or moving through hunting areas to remain visible to others. The list of open counties and other details regarding fall wild turkey hunting can be found in the 2018-2019 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations or at wildohio.gov.Several Hunting Seasons Get UnderwayIn addition to fall turkey hunting opening on Oct. 13, the statewide youth waterfowl hunting season will be held Oct. 6 and 7, followed by the regular statewide woodcock (Oct 12) and grouse (October 13) hunting seasons. Oct. 13 also marks the start of waterfowl hunting in the popular Lake Erie Marsh Zone, when the season opens for geese, ducks, coots and mergansers. Visit wildohio.gov for details.last_img read more

You Don’t Need Another New Idea

first_imgYou don’t need to rush out and read every new book with every hot, new idea. Bouncing from one idea to the next, never fully integrating what you’ve already read isn’t going to help you produce better results.You don’t need to attend another seminar searching for one new insight that’s going to totally change the game for you, if you haven’t already taken action on the all of the ideas in the notepads from the last seminar or conference you attended.You don’t need coaching or consulting to help unlock your full potential if you haven’t made the changes you discovered you needed to make when you worked with your last coach or consultant.Books provide an unparalleled return on investment of time and money. Conferences and seminars are an exceptional value for the money. Coaching and consulting can save you years of time and money struggling to get results.But the obstacle between you and success isn’t the next idea, great or small. The obstacle between you and better results is your willingness to change and your commitment to executing on the ideas you do learn from reading, attending conferences, and from coaching.Stop seeking and start executing.With a thank you to coach Rob Hatch, whose dinner conversation inspired this post.QuestionsWhat ideas have you implemented from the last book you read?What did you take action on after your last conference or seminar?Have you made the changes you needed to make from the coaching and consulting you invested in?Why are you willing to act on right now? to Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Lady Chiefs complete three-peat, beat Lady Altas in 4 sets

first_imgSan Beda, Lyceum still title favorites for NCAA Season 94 PLAY LIST 03:13San Beda, Lyceum still title favorites for NCAA Season 9400:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss “I have high respect for Perpetual because they really brought the best in us,” said Arellano head coach Obet Javier, whose squad came back in the championship series after dropping Game 1, in Filipino.Blood, sweat and tears all worth it for the Lady Chiefs as they celebrate their 3rd NCAA volleyball crown in a row. #NCAAFinals pic.twitter.com/trdOfmMj8kFEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption charges— MG (@MarkGiongcoINQ) February 12, 2019 SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Down 11-13, Arellano scored 11 unanswered points capped off by an Ebuen kill that took the fight out of Perpetual Help.Arocha, who took home the Finals MVP plum for the second consecutive time, fired a game-high 16 points, Princess Bello had 12 points and 18 digs while Ebuen added 11.Cindy Imbo paced the Lady Altas with 12 points in her final collegiate game.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes “Our loss in Game 1, was big for us because we learned how to recover and realized the things that we still need to do,” Javier added.The Lady Chiefs have now won four titles in five seasons and they did it after going on a blistering run in the fourth set led by Arocha and Ebuen.“All of what we do is for the school. This trophy is for the school,” Javier said.Three-peat for Arellano University Lady Chiefs! #NCAAFinals pic.twitter.com/kCuwUpLDJX— MG (@MarkGiongcoINQ) February 12, 2019ADVERTISEMENT Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Private companies step in to help SEA Games hostingcenter_img MOST READ US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants LATEST STORIES View comments Kawhi Leonard banks in winning basket as Raptors edge Nets Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netArellano University completed a three-peat after rolling past University of Perpetual Help, 22-25, 25-15, 25-18, 25-18, in the rubber match of NCAA Season 94 women’s volleyball Finals Tuesday before a raucous crowd at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.Reigning MVP Nicole Ebuen and Regine Arocha led the way for the Lady Chiefs, who foiled the Lady Altas’ bid to sweep this year’s volleyball tournament after ruling the men’s and juniors’ divisions.ADVERTISEMENT Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusationslast_img read more