PM Minnis excited by discussions during Austin Texas trip

first_img Related Items: By: Matt Maura (BIS) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#UnitedStates, January 25, 2018 – Austin, TX – Prime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert A. Minnis Tuesday described his stopover visit to Austin, Texas, as being “very productive” after meeting with State, technology and business officials from a number of major U.S. companies operating there.  The Austin visit is part of the Minnis Administration’s plan to establish Grand Bahama as the technology hub of the region, and follows on the heels of Grand Bahama hosting its first major Technology Summit in Freeport, in November 2017.Austin is considered the “Silicon Hills” of Texas because of the cluster of high-tech companies in the Austin metropolitan area including Dell, Hewlett Packard, Google, Samsung and Cisco Systems, among others.  Its name “Silicon Hills” refers to the hilly terrain on the west side of Austin.  The area employs more than 2,000 persons from major corporations like Apple and Microsoft.  The city also has a booming bio-tech industry with more than 8,000 employees.Prime Minister Minnis, who departed New Providence on Sunday (January 21) for Austin – the first stop on a visit to the State of Texas which includes a stopover in Houston – also met with Governor Greg Abbott “in order to establish a relationship between the Governor of Texas and the Prime Minister with the expressed purpose of identifying foreign investment and business opportunities that would benefit The Bahamas.”Prime Minister Minnis and his delegation also met with officials from the Austin Technology Council (ATC).  Since 1992, the Austin Technology Council has been the “informed opinion leader and unifying voice” of technology in Austin and Central Texas and is the region’s largest tech industry organization.“We had a very productive day in Austin where we met with the Austin Technology Council,” Prime Minister Minnis said.  “I made a presentation on doing business in The Bahamas and creating a technology hub, especially in Grand Bahama.  I further spoke about the great benefits of Grand Bahama and all of the infrastructure already present.  I spoke of the Port, of our stable government, and after completing that we had a very productive lunch meeting with Governor Greg Abbott and quite a number of business leaders.“We are now in a digital revolution and it is essential that The Bahamas gets on board and moves with that revolution.  We must not get left behind.  We can be the technology hub in the region and be the leading technology centre for the Caribbean,” the Prime Minister added.Prime Minister Minnis said that meeting involved discussions surrounding business opportunities for Bahamians and businesses opportunities between the State of Texas and The Bahamas.“We also spoke about the educational opportunities for our students as you know we have a large student population here.  We will continue those meetings.”The Prime Minister and his delegation, which includes Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Hon. Darren Henfield; Minister of State for Grand Bahama in the Office of the Prime Minister, Senator the Hon. James Kwasi Thompson; His Excellency Sidney Collie, Bahamas Ambassador to the United States of America; His Excellency Joshua Sears, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of the Prime Minister; His Excellency Cornelius A. (C.A.) Smith, Non-Resident Ambassador-designate for Central American States and Mrs. Linda Mackey, Bahamas Consul-General, Miami, also toured the Dell Headquarters where presentations were made.“I met with and spoke with their Chief Commercial Officer on possibilities of future ventures, and that will be followed up especially by State Minister Thompson with respect to creating such a hub in Grand Bahama,” Prime Minister Minnis added.The Prime Minister and his delegation traveled to Houston to meet with Television Evangelist Joel Osteen and members of the Bahamian Diaspora, including the Bahamian student population in Texas.last_img read more

Ladybug swarm is so huge it shows up on National Weather Service

first_img To the ladybug picnic obvs https://t.co/WmWJpeTNPr— A Bit Snitty (@goddamnedfrank) June 5, 2019 You sure it’s not bees on a revenge mission? Sleep tight everyone.😉 pic.twitter.com/cRup5aiXj9— StoopCrone (@SD_stoopcrone) June 5, 2019 The large echo showing up on SoCal radar this evening is not precipitation, but actually a cloud of lady bugs termed a “bloom” #CAwx pic.twitter.com/1C0rt0in6z— NWS San Diego (@NWSSanDiego) June 5, 2019 Sci-Tech Some complained that the bugs bite, but most took a practical view. “Well, better than locusts,” wrote one Twitter user. Share your voice Tonight we fly. Pass it on. pic.twitter.com/jX4SdCcYUq— JeffreyHare (@JeffreyHare) June 5, 2019 Well, better than locusts.— Jill-Marie Jones (@JillMarieJones) June 5, 2019center_img Tags Can you give ladybug updates? Like, where are they going?— Brian (@brianrtw) June 5, 2019 What do you call a cloud of ladybugs? Getty Aw, ladybugs (“ladybirds” to Brits). Sweet little red beetles with black dots that are sometimes a nuisance and mostly just ignored. Until now.There’s a massive group of ladybugs — called a “bloom” — that’s so huge it’s actually showing up on radar in southern California.On Tuesday night, the San Diego office of the National Weather Service tweeted out a video of radar in San Diego. But what appeared to be rain clouds turned out to be something else entirely. Let’s just say things got dotty.”The large echo showing up on SoCal radar this evening is not precipitation, but actually a cloud of ladybugs termed a ‘bloom,'” the tweet reported. Post a comment 0 According to CBS Los Angeles, the blob of bugs is 80 miles long and 80 miles wide, and is flying between 5,000 and 9,000 feet high. (Disclosure: CBS is CNET’s parent site.)Twitter users had a few things to say about how the rare occurrence uh, bugged them. “You sure it’s not bees on a revenge mission?” joked one.last_img read more

Study shows one reason why pigeons so rarely crash

first_img More information: Pigeons trade efficiency for stability in response to level of challenge during confined flight, C. David Williams, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1407298112 AbstractIndividuals traversing challenging obstacles are faced with a decision: they can adopt traversal strategies that minimally disrupt their normal locomotion patterns or they can adopt strategies that substantially alter their gait, conferring new advantages and disadvantages. We flew pigeons (Columba livia) through an array of vertical obstacles in a flight arena, presenting them with this choice. The pigeons selected either a strategy involving only a slight pause in the normal wing beat cycle, or a wings-folded posture granting reduced efficiency but greater stability should a misjudgment lead to collision. The more stable but less efficient flight strategy was not used to traverse easy obstacles with wide gaps for passage but came to dominate the postures used as obstacle challenge increased with narrower gaps and there was a greater chance of a collision. These results indicate that birds weigh potential obstacle negotiation strategies and estimate task difficulty during locomotor pattern selection. Explore further Feral pigeon (Columba livia) in flight. Credit: Alan D. Wilson/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 2.5 © 2015 Phys.org City dwellers know that pigeons are some of the best flyers around, unlike robins and other birds, pigeons rarely collide with cars, buildings, trees or any other obstacle. That skill has not gone unnoticed—scientists and engineers have been working for years to duplicate their abilities. In this new effort, Williams and Biewener taught some of their tamed specimens to fly through a corridor to get to a meal, then introduced obstacles and high speed cameras to find out how it is that the birds are so good at avoiding objects in their path.The obstacles were plastic pipes, placed vertically some distance apart from one another. To pass between the pipes, the birds had to scrunch themselves a bit, but how they did so, the researchers found, depended on how far apart the pipes were. They noted that when the pipes were at least a half a wing length apart, the birds lifted their wings as if to flap as they approached the obstacle, but then held them steady, above their heads as they passed between the pipes, then flapped down as soon as they were through—a technique that led to very little loss of altitude, which meant it was quite efficient. But if the pipes were moved closer together, they pulled their wings into their body, a less efficient approach, but one much less likely to result in wing damage. To make sure the first approach was not merely coincident based on where the wings were when the birds arrived at the obstacle, the researchers filmed them multiple times, finding the same result each time.Because the birds used two different techniques for allowing them safe passage through the pipe obstacles, based on what they observed as they approached, the researchers believe that choosing which technique to use was a deliberate act, which meant the birds somehow made a choice of which technique to use, just before they passed through—very impressive, especially when noting that birds, except for some such as crows or magpies, are not generally known for their smarts. Citation: Study shows one reason why pigeons so rarely crash (2015, March 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-pigeons-rarely.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Researchers conduct study to determine impact of using drones to study birds This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Harvard University has uncovered one of the secrets behind pigeons’ impressive flight abilities. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, David Williams and Andrew Biewener describe how they videotaped some of the birds flying through an obstacle course they made, and what they found when they examined the footage.last_img read more

A New AllInOne Printer from Lexmark

first_img This story appears in the February 2011 issue of . Subscribe » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » January 25, 2011 Lexmark GenesisPhoto © David JohnsonThe all-in-one business printer/fax machine/scanner is becoming a work of art.The touch-activated Lexmark Genesis pushes the bounds of small-business imaging both in performance and good looks. The 15-inch-by-16-inch Genesis is about half the size of an average all-in-one printer. It holds pages vertically, so it can scan both sides of a document in a zippy three seconds. And the unit, which connects directly to the web, is controlled via a slick 4.3-inch touch-activated screen that’s about the size of an iPhone.Performance is solid, with high quality and decent speed: 33 pages per minute in black and white, and 30 pages in color. But what really makes the Genesis unique is its design. Its attractive black form factor looks more like a high-end audio component than a printer, yet it doesn’t compromise its image quality or functionality for light business use.The Genesis is far from perfect. The vertical page layout can be clumsy when lots of copies are required, and it is not a battle-tested concept for printers. (Who knows how hinges, hardware and electronics will hold up after years in the office?) And then there is the cost: $400, in a world where $60 buys a lot of printer.But for folks who want their printers to make a statement, the Genesis is an intriguing option.last_img read more