Estranged husband placed on $600,000 bail

first_imgLa Penitence choppingThe man who brutally chopped his estranged wife at the La Penitence Market, Iswhar Heralall, 38, of Anna Regina New Housing Scheme, Essequibo, appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts before Magistrate Judy Latchman and was placed on $600,000 bail.Iswhar Heralall (in yellow)It is alleged that Heralall on Sunday, July 31, 2016, at La Penitence Public Road, Ruimveldt, unlawfully and maliciously wounded Wanita Heralall with the intent to commit murder.The prosecution did not provide any circumstantial evidence; however, a relative of the defendant disclosed to this publication that the man’s wife left him with their five children for another man and on the day in question he was asking her to return home and she embarrassed him claiming she wanted her freedom.The unrepresented man’s mother told the court that she could not afford an attorney for the defendant.Heralall was placed on bail with the following stipulations: he presents himself every Friday to the officer in charge at the Criminal Investigation Department, Ruimveldt Police Station and he stays away from the Virtual Complainant (VC) pending the outcome of the matter.The carpenter by profession will make his next court appearance on August 24, 2016.Meanwhile, the VC, who spoke to this publication, related that she was recovering comfortably at the Georgetown Public Hospital.At approximately 10:30h on Sunday, July 31, the woman ran into her estranged husband who she was reportedly in the process of divorcing after years of abuse, after she left her Lot 8 Laing Avenue, Georgetown home to commence her usual market shopping.Wanita Heralall told Guyana Times earlier this week that her youngest child was in the company of his father and he asked the child if he wanted to speak to her and the child indicated that he did not.“He ask the lil boy if he wan talk to me and the lil bai shake his head ‘no’. So I turn and seh if the lil bai don’t wanna talk to me, I don’t wanna talk to him or his father, because I don’t want no problem,” she said.Her estranged husband subsequently left, but returned as she was approaching the bicycle she rode to the market, and grabbed her left hand.“I turn around fuh walk to get my bicycle and leave because I know how he stay. So by time I coulda reach my bicycle, he come from behind me and he grab this hand and stretch it out and seh ‘come here, I wan talk to you’. I said ‘no’. And as I said no, he start chopping,” she recapped.According to Heralall, the accused then swung one chop at her head, bashing her over the right eye. The man then shouted, “don’t scream!” and forcefully pinned her hand before repeatedly hacking at her arm between the elbow and wrist.With the woman’s arm almost severed, the Essequibian allegedly told her to “take your hand and move from here”.In a bid to escape, the man then tried running through the crowd, only to be captured and dealt a thorough beating before being turned over to the Ruimveldt Police Station.last_img read more

Trump administration Democrats make progress on new NAFTA

first_imgWashington: Congressional Democrats appear to be moving from “no way” to “maybe” on President Donald Trump’s rewrite of a trade pact with Canada and Mexico. House Democrats have met four times with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, most recently on Friday, and both sides say they are making progress toward a deal that would clear the way for Congress to approve Trump’s U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA. Democratic Rep. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon, who heads a House subcommittee on trade, declared a couple of months ago that there was “no way” Democrats and the administration could bridge their differences. Lately, he’s reconsidered. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US “In the course of the last two months, we have seen significant progress,” Blumenauer said. Negotiators so far have not offered details on where they’re making progress. Democrats want the agreement to include stronger protections for workers and the environment. They also are seeking to jettison a provision they see as a giveaway to big pharmaceutical companies. Talks could still fall apart. Meetings between congressional staffers and officials from Lighthizer’s office during Congress’ August recess could prove critical. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls House Democrats working on USMCA will submit text next week to the administration “memorializing the concrete and detailed proposals that we have made.” They called on the administration to do the same. “It is time for the administration to present its proposals and to show its commitment to passing the new NAFTA and delivering on its own promises,” the Democratic lawmakers said. Supporters of USMCA are pushing for a deal before the 2020 election campaign heats up, which could make it harder for Democrats and Republicans to compromise. A senior administration official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations, said there was growing optimism within the administration about USMCA’s prospects amid signs that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was willing to work toward a compromise. “The smart money in Washington is that USMCA will pass this fall following a bargain,” said Daniel Ujczo, a lawyer with Dickinson Wright in Columbus, Ohio, who specializes in North American trade. “However, it is just as likely that we will be in a ‘bump and blame’ scenario where the president can blame Speaker Pelosi and Speaker Pelosi can blame the president.” By ratifying the agreement, Congress could lift uncertainty over the future of U.S. commerce with its No. 2 (Canada) and No. 3 (Mexico) trading partners last year and give the U.S. economy a modest boost. U.S. farmers are especially eager to make sure their exports to Canada and Mexico continue uninterrupted. Rep. Cheri Bustos of Illinois, who oversees efforts to get Democrats elected to the House, said Pelosi “understands the sense of urgency” about USMCA among some lawmakers who represent rural districts. “The hope is that we can get to a yes,” Bustos said. “But first and foremost, it has to look out for working men and women in our country.” The USMCA is meant to replace the 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement, which eliminated most tariffs and other trade barriers between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Critics including Trump, labor unions and many Democratic lawmakers called NAFTA a job killer for America because it encouraged factories to move south of the border, take advantage of low-wage Mexican workers and ship products back to the U.S. duty free. Lighthizer last year negotiated a do-over with Canada and Mexico. But it requires congressional approval. He sought to reach a deal that would win over Democrats. It includes provisions designed to nudge manufacturing back to the United States. For example, it requires that 40 per cent to 45 per cent of cars eventually be made in countries that pay autoworkers at least 16 an hour that is, in the United States and Canada and not in Mexico. But Democrats say it still doesn’t go far enough. Democrats are also lined up against a provision of USMCA that gives pharmaceutical companies 10 years’ protection from cheaper competition in a category of ultra-expensive drugs called biologics, which are made from living cells. Shielded from competition, critics warn, the drug companies could charge exorbitant prices for biologics.last_img read more

Nunavik gets help to offset high cost of living

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsInuit in Quebec are getting a taste from the province’s $2.5 billion surplus to help keep the cost of living down.The province announced that $115.8 million over six years will be spent to aid the fifteen communities in in Nunavik, located in subarctic Quebec above the 55th parallel.The Agreement on the Financing of Measures to Reduce the Cost of Living in Nunavik itself is not new, but rather a renewal.It is however almost double that of the $33 million over three years of the last agreement.“This is a good example of how the Inuit Territory of Nunavik and the Quebec government can work together to make life in the north affordable,” said Charlie Watt, president of Makivik Corporation, the organization that represents Nunavik Inuit in negotiations with Quebec and Canada.“We have to do a lot more to make life in the great north more equitable with the rest of Quebec.”Much of the money will focus on making hunting more affordable, and in order to encourage a healthier lifestyle, to help Inuit offset grocery costs with country food.“This is really good. It lowers the cost of so many items in stores and even gas prices,” said William Tagoona, communications director for Makivik in an email to APTN News.“Last count the money lowered the cost of about 5,000 items, including food Nutrition North will not cover such as KLIK, hunting clothing such as snow boots, diapers, and snowmobile oil.”Tagoona also adds that often Inuit in Nunavik are forced to choose between paying the rent or buying groceries.According to a study conducted by Laval University, the cost of living is nearly 30 per cent higher in Nunavik.A major reason for this is the remoteness of the region.“Nunavik lies completely outside the major food or commercial distribution networks. The absence of roads and the harsh climate considerably increase the cost of goods and services, which greatly increases the burden that Nunavik families bear,” said Quebec Minister of Indigenous Affairs Sylvie D’Amours in a press release.“The government’s financial assistance is thus essential to maintain and improve living conditions in Nunavik.”In the same press release, Jennifer Munick, president of the Kativik Regional government, the body responsible for providing services on the territory, succinctly described what Thursday’s announcement means to Nunavik.“This program is critical to the well-being of Nunavummiut [Inuit in Nunavik], where many don’t get enough to eat.”tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more