NBA free agency: How will the Warriors fare with a young roster?

first_imgSACRAMENTO – The day has mostly consisted of studying new scouting reports, new playbooks and new rules. Then, the Warriors young draft picks either pick up their phones, turn on their televisions or scour the web. Then, they learn they have a new teammate.“I have to follow it, knowing who’s going to be part of the team,” Warriors rookie Eric Paschall said in amusement. “You have to follow who’s on the team now. I think it’s a good group.”It might be a good group. But it is a dramatically …last_img read more

Will 49ers George Kittle return this week? Cardinals coach ‘sure’ of it

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Of course the Arizona Cardinals are preparing to face George Kittle. After all, the 49ers tight end took a helmet off his left knee and still remained in their Halloween meeting long enough to spark a 28-25 win.Kittle did not finish that game, however, nor did he play in Monday night’s 27-24 overtime defeat to the Seattle Seahawks, so uncertainty is swirling about the severity of his health and a potential comeback as soon as Sunday’s visit by the Cardinals.San Francisco 49ers …last_img read more

Infographic: what you can do to save water

first_imgSmall changes at home and work can go a long way to minimise the effects of the current drought in South Africa. We’ve collected these easy tips so everyone can contribute to saving water.Saving water can be easy by making tiny changes in lifestyle habits. (Image: Pixabay)Words and research: Priya PitamberDesign and infographic: Sandile KhumaloSouth Africa is experiencing a severe drought but we can all do our bit to save water and learn to use it wisely.The Department of Water and Sanitation has urged people to follow water saving measures strictly as dam levels across the country continue to fall.“If we are to secure enough water for each citizen amidst this very real water crisis, we need to pull together and do every bit we can to save and preserve our water resources in our province,” said MEC for co-operative governance and traditional affairs Paul Mashatile, speaking about Gauteng.Click on the image for a larger view.Source: Department of Water and SanitationWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

For love of print

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio showI welcomed the editor of Outdoor Life magazine, Anthony Licata, on my radio show recently and we had a frank discussion about the role of print in today’s outdoors media. My favorite of the former Big Three outdoor publications that included Sports Afield and Field & Steam recently went quarterly, meaning subscribers now receive their copies of Outdoor Life four times each year instead of monthly. When I inquired why, the main reason was reader interest, said Licata. He revealed that readers were asking for more narratives, or “Me and Joe”-type articles that tell a tale and take longer (read that: more space) to tell. The new issues are 100-plus pages long, and will, he said, contain plenty of such content.“For example,” he said, “an angler who wants to learn how to tie a Clouser fly now goes to You Tube to learn how” and doesn’t rely on magazines to offer such content. “We had to change with the times,” he added. “And we think we’ve taken the right path.”I hope Licata is right. I like nothing more than sitting down in my favorite easy chair with a magazine or newspaper in my lap for a relaxing read. That’s especially true of outdoor magazines.As an aside, my first hope of ever becoming an outdoor writer came from the pages of Outdoor Life the summer of 1966 when, at age 12, I discovered in its hallowed pages an article on fishing in Ohio titled “My Panfish on Light Tackle Kick.” When I noted it had been penned by a writer named Erwin Bauer who lived one suburban neighborhood over from mine, it was a watershed moment for me. I realized I didn’t have to live in Montana, Maine or Florida to make a living writing about the outdoors. If he could do it, so could I.One of the benefits of being married to a librarian, my wife last Christmas presented me with an original copy of that Outdoor Life issue, a gift I cherish. I didn’t ask if she located it in the classified section of a print magazine or online. 419er Archers Celebrate RangeA new archery range is now open at Maumee Bay State Park, located at 1400 State Park Road, Oregon. The entrance to the range is just past the park office on Park Road 1. On the range, archers will find seven shooting lanes with a combination of static bag targets and 3D targets. Use of the range is free, and the hours of operation are sunrise to sunset, seven days a week. Shooters are reminded that only field points are allowed, no broadheads.The construction of the range was completed through a partnership between the ODNR Division of Wildlife and the ODNR Division of Parks and Watercraft and was funded by Ohio hunting and fishing license sales and monies generated by the Pittman-Robertson Act. The Pittman-Robertson Act was enacted by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1937 and puts an 11% federal excise tax on sporting arms, handguns, ammunitions, bows and arrows.For more information on Ohio’s shooting sports opportunities, or to find a range near you, visit wildohio.gov. Click on the “Hunting, Trapping and Shooting Sports” tab, then click on “Shooting Ranges.” Beaver and otter trapping drawings heldOhio trappers are invited to participate in special drawings Saturday, Oct. 13, for public land beaver and river otter trapping opportunities. A list of public land trapping opportunities available at the lottery is posted at wildohio.gov under “Controlled Hunting and Trapping Events.” Interested trappers will be required to come to one of the five wildlife district offices, where registration begins at 11 a.m. and the drawing to begin at 12 p.m. For more detailed information, visit http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/stay-informed/news-announcements/post/public-drawings-offered-for-beaver-and-otter-trapping-opportunities-on-state-owned-or-managed-properties-2018 Fall turkey hunting counties increaseThanks to three counties being added — Erie, Hancock and Lucas — Ohio hunters can pursue wild turkeys in a record 70 counties this autumn during a six-week season that opens Saturday, Oct. 13 through Sunday, Nov. 25. Gobblers, poults and hens are legal game during the fall wild turkey season, but only one turkey of either sex may be harvested during the season. A valid Ohio hunting license and a fall turkey hunting permit are required to participate in the autumn opportunity that is open from 30 minutes before sunrise until sunset daily. Shotguns using shot, as well as crossbows and longbows, are permitted, and turkeys must be checked by 11:30 p.m. on the day the bird is harvested.Hunters must make their own game tag to attach to a turkey, and can use any material (cardboard, plastic, paper, etc.) as long as it contains the hunter’s name, date, time, and county of the kill. Go to the Turkey Hunting Resources page at wildohio.gov for more information on changes to the game check process.Also, all successful hunters must report their turkey harvest using the automated game-check system, which is available online and by phone seven days a week, including holidays. Hunters with a turkey permit have three options to complete the game check:Online at ohiogamecheck.com;Call 877-TAG-ITOH (824-4864); orVisit a license agent. A list of agents can be found at wildohio.gov or by calling 800-WILDLIFE (945-3543).Landowners exempt from purchasing a turkey permit, and others not required to purchase a turkey permit, cannot use the 877-TAG-ITOH option. Landowners and others not required to obtain a permit have the following game-check options:Online at ohiogamecheck.com;Visit a license agent; orCall 866-703-1928 for operator assisted landowner game-check (a convenience fee of $5.50 applies).The Division of Wildlife advises turkey hunters to wear hunter orange clothing when entering, leaving, or moving through hunting areas to remain visible to others. The list of open counties and other details regarding fall wild turkey hunting can be found in the 2018-2019 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations or at wildohio.gov.Several Hunting Seasons Get UnderwayIn addition to fall turkey hunting opening on Oct. 13, the statewide youth waterfowl hunting season will be held Oct. 6 and 7, followed by the regular statewide woodcock (Oct 12) and grouse (October 13) hunting seasons. Oct. 13 also marks the start of waterfowl hunting in the popular Lake Erie Marsh Zone, when the season opens for geese, ducks, coots and mergansers. Visit wildohio.gov for details.last_img read more

Can We Prepare for Climate Impacts Without Creating Financial Chaos?

first_imgThis post originally appeared at Ensia There is a perverse and hidden danger from climate change that few people, even those who unquestionably accept the science, know how to deal with. Someday, likely sooner than we think, the destruction that warmer global temperatures are inflicting — through record floods, wildfires, droughts, and hurricanes — could physically overwhelm our ability to maintain many communities in their existing forms. But by talking openly about this, and taking the necessary steps to address it, communities open the door to another danger. If markets suddenly value the risk of climate change properly, it could lead to a mass withdrawal of investment that kills real estate values, dries up tax revenue, and leads to a wider financial crisis.RELATED ARTICLESA New Strategy for Drought-Stressed Cities2018 Was a Big Year for Natural DisastersA New Congress and New Hope for Flood Insurance ReformBuilding Resilience for a ‘Close Encounter’ with DisasterClimate Change Resilience Could Save Trillions That is the reality confronting Ted Becker, the mayor of Lewes, Delaware, a town of about 3,000 people in which some buildings sit just steps from the Atlantic oceanfront. “When you live here every day, and you see things change, it’s hard to accept that climate change isn’t happening,” he says. Flooding that can deluge low-lying properties and make roads impassable is becoming much more frequent. Of the 549 flood days in Lewes since the 1950s, more than 200 have taken place in the past 15 years. The town has rewritten building codes so homes in flood-prone areas are built higher off the ground. About a year and a half ago it took the more aggressive step of abandoning plans to develop several roads and properties in Lewes Beach, the mayor says. The proportion of Delaware land area exposed to coastal flooding — 5.4% — is expected to grow to 7.1% within three decades because of rising seas. By then, just for the 771 homes built between 2010 and 2017, chronic flooding could imperil $526 million worth of coastal real estate. The number of homes at risk could surpass 23,000 by 2100 in the worst-case scenario. So far, neither investors nor homeowners seem to be fully incorporating this risk. “I’m not aware of anybody who has said I’m not coming here because of that,” Becker says. But market forces could quickly alter this perception — for example, if flood insurance were to more accurately reflect the costs of climate change or is scaled back in high-risk areas entirely. “Then I’m sure people will rethink whether or not they want to build in this area,” Becker says. “I think that’s a challenge that’s out there.” The dilemma that communities face — how to prepare for the impacts of climate change without scaring away homeowners and investors and setting off a damaging economic spiral — is increasingly urgent anywhere those impacts are manifesting. Experts in coastal inundation, destructive wildfires, and financially destabilizing droughts say there is no easy answer. But the best way to improve our long-term odds of survival while preventing a near-term financial fallout, they say, is to fully accept the dangers ahead. Communities that begin preparing for those dangers today will be much better positioned to thrive in a perilous 21st century than those that wait.   Reluctant to speak Last year, the Union of Concerned Scientists published a report giving a national context to the risks Lewes faces. About 147,000 coastal homes and 7,000 commercial properties across the U.S. worth $63 billion could be chronically flooded by rising seas within 15 years. That number might rise to 311,000 homes by mid-century. “That was something that we felt was just really flying under the radar,” says Erika Spanger-Siegfried, senior analyst with the group’s climate and energy program. Defensive measures like seawalls can be prohibitively expensive and may have to protect long stretches of coastline to be effective. The reality that many homes and buildings will be difficult — or perhaps impossible — to defend against rising seas is only beginning to penetrate the mainstream awareness of investors, developers, insurers, and elected officials. “By and large, it’s still fair to say that the majority of the [U.S.] coastline isn’t acting on this information,” Spanger-Siegfried says. But a sudden revaluation of market risk that leads to a pullout of investment isn’t necessarily desirable either. “When enough major market actors become aware of and begin to act on these risks, it could potentially trigger a regional housing market crisis, or even a more widespread economic crisis,” the report reads. This is why some policymakers have been reluctant to speak openly about chronic flooding. “When I was in the White House, there was talk of, ‘How much do we really want [these risks] to be widely known?’” Alice Hill, a former special assistant to President Barack Obama and a research fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, has said. “It could be just a mass realization that all of this property is severely compromised. That would be highly destabilizing to real estate markets.” Spanger-Siegfried says policymakers have no choice these days but to deliberately, and carefully, scale back investment in the riskiest regions and redirect it to safer ones. It could mean the federal government permanently reduces flood insurance coverage, buys out homeowners in exposed areas, or, in some cases, develops entirely new communities further inland. “This is going to be a really important policy frontier for us in the coming decades,” Spanger-Siegfried says. Slow-going process Edith Hannigan also stares down existential threats — but on the other side of the country. Originally from flood-prone New Jersey, Hannigan is a land-use planning program manager at the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection. “I grew up in this flooding and stormwater protection context and now I work in wildfires, but it’s still kind of the same goals underlying my work,” she says. Fires are becoming more frequent and cataclysmic in California due to increasingly warm and dry conditions. Of the 20 largest that have charred the state since the 1930s, most have occurred in the past two decades. A record-smashing wildfire season in 2017 killed at least 46 people and left $20 billion in losses. Fires in 2018 killed nearly 100 people and wreaked $24 billion worth of damage. Hannigan sees a sharp increase in public awareness of fire risks. “You just can’t ignore it anymore,” she says. She helps communities prepare for danger, especially those built where urban areas transition into wildlands. But even when communities take all the precautions — removing flammable trees, for example, or leaving 30 to 100 feet (9 to 30 meters) of “defensible space” on each side of a home — they can still burn to the ground, as Santa Rosa’s Fountaingrove neighborhood did last year. In March, Munich Re became the first major insurance company to explicitly link California’s wildfires to climate change. “If the risk from wildfires, flooding, storms, or hail is increasing, then the only sustainable option we have is to adjust our risk prices accordingly,” Ernst Rauch, the insurer’s chief climatologist, told the Guardian. The real estate industry is watching closely. A new report from the Urban Land Institute warns that some “locations, and even entire metropolitan areas, [can] become less appealing because of climate-change-related events, leading to the potential for individual assets to become obsolete.” Navigating these twin physical and financial dangers is potentially much harder in the case of wildfires than for coastal flooding, where risks are more predictable. “You don’t know how or where the next fire is going to strike,” Hannigan says. But if wildfires keep getting worse in California, as the climate science predicts, communities are going to have to take a hard look at “what type of risk they’re willing to put their residents in,” Hannigan says. Still, she continues, when it comes to land-use decisions, “getting a mindset change at a large scale in California, probably anywhere in the country, is going to be a slow-going process.” No great answer That’s certainly true of tense negotiations, which began in 2015 and wrapped up this March, among seven Southwest U.S. states to respond to a 19-year Colorado River drought and prevent the federal government from imposing mandatory water restrictions. Climate change is a major factor in the river and its reservoirs being at their driest period in 1,200 years. A 2014 report from Arizona State University estimated that one year without water from the river could cause $1.4 trillion in economic losses and impact 16 million jobs across the region. If calculations were done again today, those estimates of damage “would definitely be bigger,” says Timothy James, a co-author of the report.   Deals reached this spring among Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, and California resulted in states agreeing to take less water from the Colorado River basin. But this is just the beginning of a long-term process to figure out our survival in an era of escalating climate change. “What would we do if we lived in a more water-constrained environment?” James says. The technical fixes are easiest to predict: more water-efficient technologies and policies like higher prices on water to encourage their adoption. But adapting to climate change also requires hard decisions about the pace and scale of development. It could mean refraining from building new communities in the desert altogether. At the moment, however, Phoenix is growing rapidly.   For how long is debatable. Though a wet winter has temporarily eased fears that Lake Mead, a crucial reservoir along the Colorado River, could become dry enough to trigger a first-ever shortage declaration next year, the close call puts into stark reality just how fine a line many places are walking as climate change becomes more intense. In this context, according to the Urban Land Institute report, “leading investment managers and institutional investors are undertaking flood, resilience, and climate vulnerability scans of their portfolios” — including evaluating the financial risks of water stress and extreme heat. Vulnerable cities like Phoenix face not only looming water shortages, then, but also an investment flight that could potentially accompany them. How can communities properly respond to these sorts of dangers beyond mere short-term fixes? “You know, I don’t have a great answer,” James says. Soon enough, climate change could force us to provide one. Geoff Dembicki is a climate journalist and author.last_img read more

Raglite: Innovative Lighting Kit or Hyped Accessory?

first_imgThe creators of Raglite have taken to crowdfunding to raise capital for their new fabric mounted LED light system.Raglite has been getting a lot of buzz on the ‘net since launching their recent Kickstarter campaign. Some of our favorite photo/video blogs have posted on it over the last few days: NoFilmSchool, PopPhoto, PetaPixel, SlashGear and FStoppers.Whereas each of these posts gives a general overview of the product and crowdfunding campaign, the comments on many of these posts show strong opinions from their readers. Some readers have brainstormed unique applications for the Raglite, while others are simply calling it “overpriced” and “a scam”.It is a simple concept: LED lighting that is ‘sewn’ onto a piece of fabric. The fabric backing means that it’s lightweight, flexible, portable, not heat generating and can be mounted on a variety of surfaces. We can see a ton of uses for this.But the Raglite’s price is the sticking point for many of these commenters – $75 for the small consumer accent light up to $2400 for the RagLite Cine, a ‘color accurate’ lighting panel for professional photo/video. The claim of 100% accuracy is a bold one – most professional lights only claim in the ballpark of 90% accuracy.If the Raglite is well built out of good materials and can stand up to it’s claims, we think it might be able to grab a unique spot in the market. However, if it’s poorly executed you could save your money and build a DIY version from eBay or Amazon parts…at a fraction of the cost.Check out Raglite on Kickstarter, where they’re well on their way to reaching the $25,000 goal.last_img read more

TFA INVITING COACHES TO ATTEND NTS CAMP

first_imgTouch Football Australia is hosting it’s annual National Training Squad Camp, at Valentine’s Park in Sydney on 1-2 July, 2006.In the Interest of Coach Education, TFA are wanting to invite 3-5 coaches to attend the camp. The coaches will be selected from nominations of those who are:Current Level 2 or 3 NTL Opens Coach Active Opens Coach outside of NTL Endorsed by Permit or State TFA selected Mens, Womens and Mixed Open squads at the recent National Touch League.The purpose of the camp is to :Educate and access players on the TFA high performance program.Monitor and access players with the ability to compete in the 2009 Youth World Cup ; and Expose National Athletes to the highest level of coaching.Australia’s Open coaches and Australian Open representatives will be in attendance along with invited Youth Development members.  The invitation is to potential coaches to attend the camp to provide them with the latest coaching techniques and developments.TFA will cover the accommodation and meals while at the camp, however the invited coaches will be required to make their own travel arrangements to and from the camp.A maximum of 3 to 5 coaches will be selected and those coaches will be notified as to their success.All applicants should submit a short resume of their coaching history with an emphasis on Opens coaching, and a short statement regarding the value they will bring to the camp and hence their selection.Nominations close on Monday 22nd May.  If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Maree Curran on techsupport@austouch.com.au or (02) 6285 2703.last_img read more

10 months agoMan City boss Guardiola tribute to Sterling after goalscoring cameo

first_imgMan City boss Guardiola tribute to Sterling after goalscoring cameoby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola was pleased to see Raheem Sterling on the scoresheet for victory over Everton.Sterling came off the bench to score in the 3-1 win.”Raheem – when he has no time to think in front of goal – he’s always good,” Guardiola said.”The cross was amazing from Fernandinho and it was a great finish. We are not the tallest team in the world but after just a few minutes, it was an important goal for him and everyone. “I see him so calm. I think he has handled the last years in many situations and rumours – not nice things about him or his family or the colour of his skin. I admire him and appreciate that it’s not easy for him.”He’s loved by all staff and in the locker room.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

9 months agoChelsea striker Giroud: Cesc a great opportunity for Monaco

first_imgChelsea striker Giroud: Cesc a great opportunity for Monacoby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveOlivier Giroud has no doubts former Chelsea teammate Cesc Fabregas will be a success with AS Monaco.Cesc left Chelsea last week for ASM and made his debut in last night’s 1-1 draw at Olympique Marseille.Giroud told Telefoot: “Cesc is a great player, he has this quality of vision of the game, of intelligence of passes. “He’s one of the best players I’ve played with. “This is a great opportunity for Monaco.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

24 days agoNicol urges calm around Chelsea outcast Pulisic

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Nicol urges calm around Chelsea outcast Pulisicby Paul Vegas24 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool legend Steve Nicol says Christian Pulisic will come good at Chelsea.Chelsea fans have been pleading with Frank Lampard to give Pulisic more game time in the league, but the boss seems to prefer Pedro and Willian on either flank with Tammy Abraham in the middle.Regardless, Nicol explained on ESPN FC that Chelsea fans need to just give the youngster time, because he will get good in the end.“I think everyone should calm down,” he said.“He’s 21, he’s just started out on his Premier League career.“He’s what, six or seven games in? And everyone is jumping up and pressing the panic button.“This kid has ability, he also has something very important – a level head.“As much as everyone around him may be panicking, he understands that – because he’s been through it already at Dortmund.“He knows that patience is needed, and that through the ability he has, he’ll get there in the end.“I’m sure that right now he’s thinking – I’ve done it all before, I need to step up a level, but I can do this.” last_img read more