Ralph Hasenhuttl stunned by Southampton’s potentially table-topping form | Football News

first_imgBut following a run of four victories from their last five outings, Hasenhuttl’s side are on the brink of a small piece of history.“If you told me this would happen before the season, I would say you are a little bit stupid,” said Hasenhuttl. “We are lucky that we play Friday evening because it gives us a great chance.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Friday 6th November 8:00pm It is 32 years, when Southampton were managed by Chris Nicholl, that they could last regard themselves as top-flight table-toppers. 3:09 Hasenhuttl will be without Danny Ings for the visit of Newcastle after the striker underwent surgery on a knee injury. The England international, who has scored five times this season, is set to be sidelined for at least one month.In his absence, Theo Walcott and Shane Long are in contention to spearhead Southampton’s attack alongside Che Adams.Hasenhuttl, 53, added: “Whoever gets the chance to play should know this is a big chance and grab it because we now have four to six weeks without Danny.“We need somebody who gives us alternatives, and who gives us the best opportunities for what we demand – we will take a decision from there.” Ralph Hasenhuttl admits he could have never predicted his Southampton side’s potentially table-topping form before the start of the season.Victory against Newcastle at St Mary’s Stadium on Friday Night Football, live on Sky Sports, will see the Saints spend at least a day at the top of the Premier League for the first time in the club’s history.- Advertisement – FREE TO WATCH: Highlights from Southampton’s win against Aston Villa in the Premier League Kick off 8:00pm preview image It caps a remarkable 12 months for Hasenhuttl after his side were thrashed 9-0 by Leicester last October and facing up to the prospect of a relegation dogfight.But they went on to finish a credible 11th and head into Friday’s fixture fifth in the division after their opening seven matches. However, Hasenhuttl is refusing to get carried away with his side’s encouraging early-season form.“I have seen so many teams in the beginning of the season being top of the table and near the top, and then relegated,” the former RB Leipzig manager added.“We know things can change so quickly – a few injuries or something like that – but at the moment we are a very strong side and we showed again we can have a high level of performing.“Before I came here, I worked at a team where losing was nearly not allowed because we wanted to be top in Germany, and this mentality I tried to implement from the first day that I’m here.“We have that mentality of, I sometimes call it, we like to be the pirate and it’s more fun than to join the navy. So it’s definitely something we can use every day and makes it fun to go and grab some points from the big teams.” 0:35 Danny Ings receives treatment for an injury late in the second half – Advertisement – Southampton defender Jannik Vestergaard is confident the team can cope with the absence of Danny Ings as the striker recovers from injurylast_img read more

Hammers must pay debts before move

first_img The club did have a buyer in place for Upton Park but that fell through due to the delays in the deal to be Olympic Stadium stadium tenants, and Brady expects income projections from the sale to be down 50% on 2010 due to the sluggish property market. Brady added she did not expect the sale would cover much more than the lump sum the club will have to pay to the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC) to move to the Olympic venue. She said: “We did have a tentative deal [for Upton Park] but that fell away. We hope the money generated from the sale of Upton Park will be enough to fulfil our commitment and to help pay off some of our bank debt. “When we bought the club and took on more than £100million of debt that was guaranteed on the ground. We have to pay off all our bank debt to move, we can’t take the debt with us. “If there is any excess [from Upton Park sale] it will meet some of that debt but I don’t expect there will be.” Brady was asked to respond to a claim by former sports minister Richard Caborn that West Ham was getting the £600million stadium for just £15million plus £2million a year rent with the tax-payer picking up the tab. Brady defended the deal however, saying: “The alternative scenario does not bear thinking about. “West Ham is not getting a free stadium. The stadium was built for the Olympics and what are we going to do with it? Across the world stadiums that are not used die. Press Association The Hammers have debts of £70million, half of that bank debt secured on Upton Park, and that has to be cleared when the ground is sold ahead of the move to the Olympic Stadium in 2016. Brady, giving evidence to the House of Lords committee on Olympic and Paralympic legacy, also insisted that the club was not getting the stadium on the cheap and that the deal was good value to the tax-payer. “Without anchor tenants the cost would be huge to the tax payer.” She added that West Ham would generate “many hundreds of millions of pounds” over the 100-year lease. The committee also heard from Leyton Orient chairman Barry Hearn who insisted West Ham’s move was “not a done deal” because of his ongoing judicial review and legal action against the Premier League. Hearn wants his club to be able to ground-share with West Ham and use just the lower tier for Orient’s matches. He also described the LLDC’s deal with West Ham as “state sponsorship beyond my wildest dreams”. Hearn said: “This is not a done deal. West Ham have an agreement but I have a judicial review outstanding and litigation with the Premier League that West Ham even moving would be a breach of Premier League rules. “We have ended up in situation where we have gifted £500million of tax-payers’ money to a Premier League club that has a turnover of more than £100million. It’s a wonderful gift but if I was an Arsenal fan I would wonder why we bothered paying to build a new stadium. “This is state sponsorship beyond my wildest dreams. In effect it’s rent free as they have ability to develop Upton Park.” West Ham will have to pay off all their bank debt before their move to the Olympic Stadium, the club’s vice-chairman Karren Brady has revealed.last_img read more

With Three Years Left…

first_imgOf all of the great men and women who have gone down in history’s hall of fame, we would be hard pressed to find any who took the easy road; who were afraid to disappoint friends and family; who were afraid to rock the boat, to upset entitlements; who were afraid to change the course of history; who were afraid to stand up for what was right but instead chose what was convenient; who let sleeping dogs lie; who were afraid to put their very lives on the line.No, history’s hall of fame is replete with men and women who stood up for what was right even when it was unpopular; when it wasn’t what everybody wanted to hear; even when it cost them the ultimate sacrifice — their very lives. From the ancient prophets to the new testament martyrs, to the Rosa Parkses, Martin Luther Kings, Nelson Mandelas, Jerry Rawlingses, Leymah Gbowees and Malala Yousefzais of our time, as well as those who stood with them; the one thing they all had in common was the courage to go against the grain; to do something radical; something never before done. And not just for self; but they realized soon enough that what may have begun as a personal struggle had become a fight for the human dignity of millions more than just themselves.They realized that if they had to please the establishment, they would be slaves a long time; slaves to others, slaves to systems, slaves to tyranny, corruption and terror.It is time Liberia did something different; something radical. The solutions to our problems are not in the World Bank safe; not under lock and key at the International Monetary Fund; not the exclusive intellectual property of the United States government. The solutions to our problems lie right here with us, in our very hands. It is our very will to change and to succeed. Our power to succeed is directly proportional to our will to do so.So what does that mean in practical terms?It means we stop importing rice, especially during the peak of production, after the harvest; we promote the sale of locally grown “country rice”, which is much tastier and much more nutritious anyway. That means we get Lofa, Nimba and Bong back in business, and hire some cargo aircraft to transport produce to our markets until we can pave those roads and build some railroads.It means we stop importing any foods that can be grown or raised here. In addition to rice, that includes poultry, beef, fish and vegetables. If we expect to eat everyday, that will force us to quadruple our production and get our goods to market.It means whatever we have to import (most manufactured goods for example), we import from Africa first. If it absolutely cannot be found in Africa, the we import from further away as demand dictates. That means if Mr. Trawally on the Kakata highway produces toilet tissue, we prioritize his produce. Insofar as his production capacity is insufficient to meet the demands of the market (in terms of quantity as well as quality), we then import from a regional partner (Ghana for example). If it cannot be found in ECOWAS, we source from SADC or East Africa.Would it not be less expensive for us to import from Ghana than from the Middle East? But if everything we use, eat and drink comes from so far away, no wonder prices are so much higher than people can afford!“We Buy African First” should be the commercial mantra of the continent.And why does the country with the largest shipping registry in the world not have vessels of its own? What do LISCR and Maritime do with all that money?It means we set our own agenda and operate according to timed deliverables. That means any development plan (master, medium and short term) has to have a TIMETABLE for EXECUTION. If we continue to produce 100-page documents outlining what we’d like to see done in the future, none of it will ever get done. We need measurable goals and deliverables. Measurements make for accountability.It means we begin to prosecute LACC offenders with immediate effect, regardless of status or class, and reward those who did accurately declare their assets. It is much more possible to build capacity than to teach integrity.It means we remove family members from positions of authority, to include negotiations and advisory posts. We eliminate the stench of nepotism.With three more years to go, if this administration wants a legacy, it can be done. But it will take Iron Lady backbone, which not even blood can break.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

De Gea could miss Liverpool tie due to injury

first_img0Shares0000De Gea could miss Liverpool tie due to hamstring injury. Photo/TEAMTALKLONDON, United Kingdom, Oct 16 – David de Gea’s availability for Manchester United’s clash with Liverpool is uncertain after picking up a suspected hamstring injury while on international duty.Spain booked their place at Euro 2020 as they came from behind to draw 1-1 with Sweden, but United will be more concerned with the health of their goalkeeper, who limped out of the action. The 28-year-old goalkeeper hobbled off after an hour of the game, and there are now big concerns in the United camp that he will be unable to play against Liverpool at Old Trafford in a huge game on Sunday afternoon.In an innocuous-looking incident, De Gea immediately grabbed the back of his thigh after clearing a backpass from his own player, and there are fears he may have pulled his hamstring.He sat on the ground in his six-yard box before making his own way off the pitch accompanied by the Spanish medical team.United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer will be hoping the injury is not serious and will be anxiously waiting for an update on his fitness.Spain did not comment after the game, but even if it is not serious, the keeper has to be rated as an early doubt for the visit of Jurgen Klopp’s men. 0Shares0000(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Raiders’ season reaches new depths in embarrassing loss to 49ers

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSANTA CLARA — If you didn’t think a miserable Raiders season could get any worse, think again.Somehow, the Raiders stooped to even lower lows against one of two teams that entered Week 9 with a worse record than their miserable 1-6 mark. The Raiders made a quarterback starting his first career regular season game look like a potential future Hall of Famer, and in the process cemented themselves as the worst team in …last_img read more

Melecio just happy to be back for La Salle after recovering from dengue

first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa In his return, Melecio scored just three points and turned the ball over twice in the Green Archers’ 85-62 win over University of the Philippines in the UAAP Season 83 men’s basketball tournament.Melecio, though, is just glad to be back for La Salle after missing four games and didn’t mind the measly numbers he tallied. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I told myself that I’d be happy by just being on the floor, if I do that I’m already set,” said Melecio in Filipino. “I really missed playing and I was so happy when I was able to play again.” “I’m not at a hundred percent yet because it’s not like you’ll play well immediately after an injury or sickness,” said Melecio. “I’ll just have to be patient.” For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City MOST READ View comments BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president LATEST STORIEScenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:36Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 8002:16Duque: It’s up to Palace to decide on Dengvaxia’s fate01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games FILE – La Salle’s Aljun Melecio during the Green Archers game against the UP Fighting Maroons in the first round. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netDe La Salle guard Aljun Melecio just had his first game back after contacting dengue fever almost a month ago, and looked like a shell of his former self.Melecio averaged 14 points, three rebounds, 3.3 assists, and 1.8 steals in his first four games before getting hospitalized for two weeks.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Read Next Tenorio flourishing in finals despite playing through injury Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMClast_img read more

Experts to debate the rise of India and China and the US

first_imgAddThis ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduJeff Falk713-348-6775jfalk@rice.edu Experts to debate the rise of India and China and the US foreign policy response at Rice’s Baker Institute Dec. 13HOUSTON – (Dec. 6, 2012) – Two experts will challenge conventional views on the roles of India and China in the Asian power structure and the implications for U.S. foreign policy Dec. 13 at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.Who: RAND Corp. senior political scientist Eric Heginbotham and author and independent consultant Rollie Lal.What: Discussion of “Counterweights or Double Trouble? How the Rise of India and China Will Affect U.S. Foreign Policy.”Russell Green, the Baker Institute’s Will Clayton Fellow in International Economics, and Steven Lewis, the Baker Institute’s C.V. Starr Transnational China Fellow, will moderate the discussion.When: Thursday, Dec. 13, 6 p.m.Where: Rice University, Baker Hall, Kelly International Conference Facility, 6100 Main St.To U.S. policymakers worried about a long-term threat from China, India looks like a useful counterbalance. Last June, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta described military cooperation with India as the linchpin of the recent U.S. foreign policy pivot toward Asia. But is India the reliable partner and like-minded custodian of Asian stability that the U.S. foreign policy establishment assumes? In answering this question, Heginbotham and Lal will debate the role of India and China in the U.S. rebalancing strategy. The event is co-sponsored by the Baker Institute Transnational China Project and International Economics Program.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at jfalk@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.To view more info about the event, visit www.bakerinstitute.org/events/counterweights-or-double-trouble-how-the-rise-of-india-and-china-will-affect-u.s.-foreign-policy. A live webcast will be available at http://bakerinstitute.org/webcasts.-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Founded in 1993, the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston ranks among the top 20 university-affiliated think tanks globally and top 30 think tanks in the United States. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute sponsors more than 20 programs that conduct research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows and Rice University scholars. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog.  last_img read more