Enduring Suffering

first_imgThere was a certain town called Gee, surrounded by other smaller towns such as the Tee Town, Dweh Town and others. Tee Town and the other towns were smaller towns and Gee Town was a very big town.Citizens of Tee Town and the other towns lived happily, until Gee Town learned that Tee and Dweh Towns were rich in cash crops, such as rubber, palm trees, coconuts, among others.Citizens of Gee Town began to act wicked to the people of Tee Town, Dweh Town and other smaller towns. Whenever Tee Town and Dweh Town citizens were harvesting their crops, Gee Town people would forcibly go and take whatever they wanted. This was Gee Town people’s usual habit.  One day, Swen, a boy of 15 years and from Dweh Town got tired with the way Gee Town people were treating his people, so he decided to express his feelings to King Nyan of Gee Town.At a meeting the boy told bravely him, “Oh king, you have treated my people so bad that we don’t have our freedoms anymore but you must know that as a king, other people in this region have the right to live like everyone else.“You should not think that Oh King, only your people should have peace and prosperity and we ask for better treatment as human beings.”Thereafter, the unhappy king ordered and his men killed the poor boy. The boy’s death was felt by all the people who knew how brave he was to confront the wicked king of Gee. The Gee people continued their wickedness and tormented their neighbors.Though the people of the other towns cried out for deliverance from the burden that the people of Gee had imposed on them, deliverance did not come, many of the suffering believed that in due time, God, the maker of all things would set things right and therefore they endured their suffering under the wicked king of Gee.Editor’s Note: Marcy T. Forpoh is a high school student. He loves to read and write.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

National Prayer Day marred by divisions

first_imgThat changed in the 1990s, when the National Day of Prayer Committee established a task force to help coordinate activities across the country and connected it with Colorado’s Focus on the Family. The conservative group, led by James Dobson, took charge of the day, then insisted that all participants adhere to its “Judeo-Christian” theological tenets. A participant must “be an evangelical Christian who has a personal relationship with Christ … and acknowledge that I am working for the Lord Jesus Christ and the furthering of his work on Earth.” Three years ago, the task force, now led by Dobson’s wife, Shirley, caused an uproar in Utah by saying that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Seventh-day Adventists, Jews, Buddhists and Hindus would not be allowed to pray at any of the services it sponsors. The exclusions still apply, which is why Chaplain Linda Walton has helped organize an alternative service for National Prayer Day at the Provo LDS Tabernacle. Some faiths do not say traditional prayers but may meditate on deity, Walton says. “Some will stand up, hold their arms up, lay on their bellies, whatever. We are going to continue to support everyone’s ability to do that.” • Photo Gallery: Day of Prayer Thursday’s National Day of Prayer was once a symbol of American unity and faith in God that transcended boundaries. In recent years, though, the decades-old tradition has become mired in divisions. Across the nation, most celebrations are organized by and for evangelical Christians, with others choosing to host alternative services. Believers in Muncie, Ind.; Oklahoma City; Troy, Mich.; Salt Lake City and more have added more inclusive events, with participation across the spiritual spectrum. The holiday began in 1775, when the Continental Congress asked Americans to pray for guidance as it was trying to birth a nation. Abraham Lincoln called for a day of fasting and prayer in 1863. Nearly a century later, Harry Truman made it an annual event, and in 1988, Ronald Reagan set aside the first Thursday in May so citizens could join in worship across all religious boundaries. Walton, a Seventh-day Adventist, has been helping with this kind of interfaith prayer service for a decade. Mormons have been included among the organizers, but this is the first time it has been in an LDS setting with a high-ranking LDS official speaking. “We’ve rotated it around to all different denominations,” she says. “It’s time for the LDS to have their turn.” The Rev. Gregory Johnson of Standing Together, a joint ministry of Utah evangelical clergy, has no problem with the alternative service – and may even attend – but he defends the task force’s approach. “Our events are led by evangelicals, but the public is welcome,” says Johnson, who coordinated several evangelical-only services in Orem and Salt Lake City. “We have no desire to offend or hurt people’s feelings, but it’s important to pray with others who share the idea of who God is.” By most measures, the National Day of Prayer Task Force’s efforts have been successful. In 2005, it claimed more than 50,000 “prayer events” nationwide and had an annual budget in excess of $2 million, according to a report by the Texas Freedom Network, a religious liberties watchdog group in Austin. “They’ve hijacked what was supposed to be an opportunity for all Americans of all faiths to pray for the country,” said Dan Quinn, communications director for the Texas Freedom Network. “In a time of crisis that we are in right now, wouldn’t it be better to ask for guidance on how to pull Americans of all faiths together?” pstack@sltrib.com (801) 257-8725. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more