The four most interesting forecasts for the travel industry in 2020

first_imgAmazon has been interested in the travel sector for years, and next year there is a possibility that this company will enter it through the big door. With Expedia currently in a mess and still looking for a new CEO and CFO, after the duo stepped down in early December, a deep-pocket company like Amazon could buy the Expedia Group and its travel companies “cheaply” companies. Amazon buys Expedia, TripAdvisor joins Trip.com Airbnb will indeed launch some sort of flight-related service in 2020, but it will do so in their own way. After all, Airbnb has hired Fred Reid, the former CEO of Virgin America, as the global director of air transport to help achieve that goal. Given that the company plans to launch a public offering in 2020, Airbnb intends to show investors that there is room for growth and intends to become a “more complete” travel solution. Also, Expedia has had problems with Google, and Amazon is the best example of a company that can stand up to Google. Hotel brands are gradually disappearing Meanwhile, Ctrip, which was rebranded as Trip.com Group, entered into a joint venture with TripAdvisor in 2019 to expand into markets outside of China. TripAdvisor continuously develops its tours, activities and restaurant reservations and has top-notch user-generated content. However, their hotel reservation system is used rather poorly. Ctrip could greatly expand its global image and brand and “use” TripAdvisor, according to Skift. Ever since Airbnb introduced the word “flights” in its presentation back in 2016, it has been speculated that the company’s entry into the flight market is just around the corner. Airbnb launches a flight booking service Another decade is behind us, and Skift’s team of editors and journalists outlined predictions and expectations in the tourism and travel sector for 2020. Although some of them may be unusual and difficult to achieve, the most interesting and relevant ones will be presented in this article. Source / photo: Shift; Pixabay People will think more about the number and necessity of travel We have not witnessed a large consolidation of catering companies since 2016 when Marriott International bought Starwood Hotels & Resorts and thus became the largest hotel company in the world in terms of number of rooms. Accor also rocked things that year with the purchase of Fairmont, Raffles and Swissôtel brands and a stake in the 21c Museum Hotels boutique brand. The French hotel giant bought Mövenpick Hotels & Resorts last year, which has 90 properties worldwide. Meanwhile, rumors are circulating that Marriott or the InterContinental Hotels Group will try to buy Accor. What’s going on here? We are far from the time when passengers had very few options where to stay on the trip, and now there are too many of them. Marriott has 30 brands, and Accor as many as 39, and it is predicted that next year we will witness the overlap of certain brands and the consolidation of hotel companies. Certain types of travel industry clients are expected to target quality rather than quantity. This could manifest in several ways: people will set the upper limit on the number of trips per year, consider alternative ways of traveling, or combine business and private travel to reduce the number of flights. Travel has so far been largely exempt from conscious consumerism because actions like buying organic vegetables or cycling to work contribute to someone’s quality of life, that is, inspire. On the other hand, not going on vacation seems like a big sacrifice to wealthy consumers. However, with the rise of the so-called “shame of flying”, awareness of environmental issues and taxation of frequent flights in the UK, this will begin to change. People will still want to travel, but will think more deeply about the number and necessity of travel. Passing that awareness on to your friends and companions will become more widespread – and status in itself.last_img read more

Cornell’s Pannell rebounds from broken foot to join 300-point club

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ After 13 months filled with uncertainty of his future and concern for his collegiate career, Rob Pannell is back atop his craft. A broken foot on March 3, 2012, left Pannell’s future with Cornell — and college lacrosse — in doubt.But on March 26 of this year, Pannell joined elite company, scoring his 300th career point.“It’s been a goal of mine for a while now, a few years,” Pannell said, “and it’s always good to reach your goals.”A five-point day in a blowout win over Siena placed Pannell on the prestigious list of now only eight players to score 300 points in a college career.It was the latest accomplishment in the legendary career of the Big Red’s all-time leading scorer. He’s won a pair of Jack Turnbull Awards as the nation’s best attack and is the presumed frontrunner for this year’s Tewaaraton Award.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAnd it all comes just more than a year after his NCAA future was cast into serious doubt.On March 3, 2012, Pannell broke his left foot in a blowout victory over Army. Just weeks into his senior season at Cornell, Pannell’s collegiate career could have ended.For about three months, Pannell’s future was left shrouded in mystery. Having completed four years of college, Pannell would have the opportunity to leave school and play Major League Lacrosse. Or he could have transferred, perhaps, to Virginia, where he would’ve had the opportunity to play with his brother.But there was a way he could stay at Cornell. Though Ivy League rules prohibit an athlete with a degree from gaining an extra year of eligibility, Pannell could simply opt not to graduate and appeal to the league about gaining another year. His appeal was granted, and he has come back stronger than ever.“I was pretty confident that when I returned that I was going to be the player that I was before I got injured,” Pannell said. “I’m of the type of attitude that I wouldn’t have been happy if I had come back and was a lesser player.”On Oct. 7, 2012, Pannell asserted his return to his coach and the rest of the nation. More than six months after his injury, Pannell took the field at The Landon School in Bethesda, Md., for the Capital Lacrosse Invitational.First came a pair of scrimmages with his Cornell team. To end the day, he took the field with Team USA. Playing against the best players in the world, Pannell stole the show, tallying eight points.He was back.“I was able to sit in the stands and watch him play,” Cornell head coach Ben DeLuca said, “and I think at that point in time, I knew there was going to be no problem having him back and integrating him back into our offense.”Now, he’s lumped in with the likes of Matt Danowski, Mikey Powell and Tim Nelson as 300-point scorers and lacrosse legends.Syracuse head coach John Desko coached Powell at SU in the early 2000s. Though he hasn’t seen the newest member of the 300-point club play a ton this season, he has a deep appreciation for Pannell’s game and his ability to rebound from injury.“He’s been very productive, you know,” Desko said. “This is a fifth year for him, and I think he’s probably playing his best lacrosse coming off an injury last year and another year of maturity, another year of, you know, playing.”What amazes Desko most, though, is how often Pannell has the ball in his stick, but what sets Pannell apart is his ability without the ball in his stick.Pannell scored just three points in a win over Dartmouth on March 30, but the Big Red still put 21 goals on the board in a 16-goal victory. He diverts so much attention that it opens things up for his teammates.It’s that type of mentality that he has in mind as he looks to achieve his next goal. He’s already scored his 300th career point and set Cornell’s all-time scoring record, but it leaves one glaring hole on his resume: a national championship.“That’s the ultimate goal of mine and of our team,” Pannell said. “A lot of other goals, or we like to say, ‘standards,’ for the Cornell lacrosse team will be set along the way.” Comments Published on April 2, 2013 at 12:33 am Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2last_img read more