The four most interesting forecasts for the travel industry in 2020

first_imgAmazon has been interested in the travel sector for years, and next year there is a possibility that this company will enter it through the big door. With Expedia currently in a mess and still looking for a new CEO and CFO, after the duo stepped down in early December, a deep-pocket company like Amazon could buy the Expedia Group and its travel companies “cheaply” companies. Amazon buys Expedia, TripAdvisor joins Trip.com Airbnb will indeed launch some sort of flight-related service in 2020, but it will do so in their own way. After all, Airbnb has hired Fred Reid, the former CEO of Virgin America, as the global director of air transport to help achieve that goal. Given that the company plans to launch a public offering in 2020, Airbnb intends to show investors that there is room for growth and intends to become a “more complete” travel solution. Also, Expedia has had problems with Google, and Amazon is the best example of a company that can stand up to Google. Hotel brands are gradually disappearing Meanwhile, Ctrip, which was rebranded as Trip.com Group, entered into a joint venture with TripAdvisor in 2019 to expand into markets outside of China. TripAdvisor continuously develops its tours, activities and restaurant reservations and has top-notch user-generated content. However, their hotel reservation system is used rather poorly. Ctrip could greatly expand its global image and brand and “use” TripAdvisor, according to Skift. Ever since Airbnb introduced the word “flights” in its presentation back in 2016, it has been speculated that the company’s entry into the flight market is just around the corner. Airbnb launches a flight booking service Another decade is behind us, and Skift’s team of editors and journalists outlined predictions and expectations in the tourism and travel sector for 2020. Although some of them may be unusual and difficult to achieve, the most interesting and relevant ones will be presented in this article. Source / photo: Shift; Pixabay People will think more about the number and necessity of travel We have not witnessed a large consolidation of catering companies since 2016 when Marriott International bought Starwood Hotels & Resorts and thus became the largest hotel company in the world in terms of number of rooms. Accor also rocked things that year with the purchase of Fairmont, Raffles and Swissôtel brands and a stake in the 21c Museum Hotels boutique brand. The French hotel giant bought Mövenpick Hotels & Resorts last year, which has 90 properties worldwide. Meanwhile, rumors are circulating that Marriott or the InterContinental Hotels Group will try to buy Accor. What’s going on here? We are far from the time when passengers had very few options where to stay on the trip, and now there are too many of them. Marriott has 30 brands, and Accor as many as 39, and it is predicted that next year we will witness the overlap of certain brands and the consolidation of hotel companies. Certain types of travel industry clients are expected to target quality rather than quantity. This could manifest in several ways: people will set the upper limit on the number of trips per year, consider alternative ways of traveling, or combine business and private travel to reduce the number of flights. Travel has so far been largely exempt from conscious consumerism because actions like buying organic vegetables or cycling to work contribute to someone’s quality of life, that is, inspire. On the other hand, not going on vacation seems like a big sacrifice to wealthy consumers. However, with the rise of the so-called “shame of flying”, awareness of environmental issues and taxation of frequent flights in the UK, this will begin to change. People will still want to travel, but will think more deeply about the number and necessity of travel. Passing that awareness on to your friends and companions will become more widespread – and status in itself.last_img read more

ENPAM commits €150m to medical technology fund

first_imgENPAM, Italy’s €17bn pension fund for medical consultants, has committed €150m to a venture capital fund investing in early-stage companies within the medical technologies sector.Principia III raised a total of €160m at its first close, with an ultimate subscription of up to €500m to be invested in around 30 companies. The €150m commitment by the first-pillar fund will be drawn down over approximately five years.ENPAM said it was making the investment because healthcare was a strategic sector it wished to develop and support, and that doing so would be fundamental to intergenerational sustainability of the fund.But a spokesman for ENPAM said there were also strong financial and operational reasons to target healthcare provision in Italy. “Firstly, we believe it is poised to be a strategic and fast-growing sector, because of demographic ageing trends in Italy and Europe.“Secondly, tight budget policies will likely benefit innovative processes in public healthcare delivery, which is one of the target zones for Principia III.”He said Principia III was the only venture capital fund with the agenda to invest in this type of company.The spokesman pointed to manager Principia SGR’s inclusion of Italy’s National Research Council (CNR) as one of its shareholders as “very important”, as it would be able to rely on its relationships with research institutions.Within ENPAM’s portfolio, the investment will form part of its mission-related holdings – assets linked to long-term sustainability deriving from the medical professions, invested through bonds, equities, private equity and real estate.The portfolio also includes a further €50m commitment to healthcare, in assisted-living residential health facilities.The mission-related segment has a maximum allocation of 5%.Initially, the investment in Principia III will represent over half of ENPAM’s 1% strategic allocation to private equity, although the fund expects to increase the share further.The remainder of the private equity allocation – 0.4% of the total portfolio – is made up of stakes in five other funds, run by Igi, Quadrivio and Dgpa Sator, and also including a stake in Principia II, which invests in small and medium-sized enterprises in the digital innovation space, mainly in central and southern Italy.Additionally, ENPAM has holdings Advanced Capital III, Advanced Capital Real Estate and Network Capital Partners, private equity fund-of-funds.ENPAM’s internal rate of return on its private equity portfolio since inception in 2002 has been around 1.7%. Over the same period, the FTSE Italia Small Cap Index – the nearest benchmark, given the domestic bias of the portfolio – returned -1.0%.Although ENPAM’s investment forms by far the major share of Principia III, the fund did not see it has a drawback.The spokesman said: “Venture capital is not well-established in Italy, where bank funding has been the primary conduit and legislators have only recently made it possible for the country’s smaller companies to issue bonds directly.“So we are willing to be a catalyst through being the first big investor in this fund,” he added. ”Others will follow.”For more on Italy’s pension fund market, read the past coverage by IPElast_img read more

Area Football Friday Scores (9-1)

first_imgArea Football Friday Scores.Week #3  (9-1)Batesville  7     South Dearborn  0LaSalle  13     East Central  0Lawrenceburg  35     Milan  7Franklin County  40     Rushville  19Oldenburg  26     Edinburgh  6Greensburg  24     Connersville  20Monroe Central  24     North Decatur  0South Decatur  27     Trinity Lutheran  0Switz. County vs. Trimble County  PPD-Rescheduled  (9-22)Union County  42     Union City  12New Albany  28     Jennings County  14Floyd Central  27     Madison  10last_img read more