Antonio Rudiger geared up for Arsenal clash

first_imgChelsea defender Antonio Rudiger knows that they must beat Arsenal at the Emirates on Saturday to keep their top four hopes alive.After their 2-1 home win against Newcastle United on Saturday, Chelsea will travel to Arsenal on Saturday evening for what promises to be a tough derby game.The Blues are six points ahead of both fifth-placed Arsenal and a resurgent Manchester United side who are sixth on goal difference.And Rudiger believes that a victory at Arsenal will go a long way to help Chelsea achieve their top-four ambitions.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“It was an important win [against Newcastle]. Now we run away a bit from Arsenal and next week we are playing against them,” he told the club’s website.“It’s a derby and also a very important game for staying in the top four.“We have to secure the top four as quickly as possible. If something different happens we can still be title contenders then why not, but if we have the chance to go ahead of Arsenal and also Man United we have to win our games.”last_img read more

New York might fine you for texting while crossing the street

first_imgYou might get fined in New York for texting if this bill becomes law. Christian Vierig / Getty Images No matter how important your text might be, if you’re crossing the street, New York thinks it can wait. New York state Sen. John Liu introduced a bill last week that would ban texting while walking. Pedestrians could be fined between $25 and $250 if they’re seen “using any portable device” while crossing a roadway, according to a copy of the bill obtained by The Guardian. “Using” a device means looking at it, playing games, being online, sending emails, texting and more, according to the bill. The legislation makes exceptions for emergency first-responders and those trying to contact hospitals, fire departments, police and other emergency services.”This bill in no way absolves drivers of their mandate to yield to pedestrians, and simply reminds people to resume texting after getting across the street safely,” Liu said in an emailed statement. Marco Conner, interim executive director of Transportation Alternatives, said he is opposed to the bill. “We should first identify the problem and the cause,” Conner said.Conner said that Liu fails to cite data that pedestrians are the ones causing their own injuries or deaths by walking into traffic while distracted. Instead, Conner said a recent rise in pedestrian fatalities nationwide “is believed to all be driver related.”In terms of solutions, Conner said he doesn’t see more regulation of phones as the answer. Conner said reducing vehicle speeds and reducing the number of vehicles on the streets should be priorities instead. Tags 3 Commentscenter_img Share your voice Mobilelast_img read more

Study shows one reason why pigeons so rarely crash

first_img More information: Pigeons trade efficiency for stability in response to level of challenge during confined flight, C. David Williams, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1407298112 AbstractIndividuals traversing challenging obstacles are faced with a decision: they can adopt traversal strategies that minimally disrupt their normal locomotion patterns or they can adopt strategies that substantially alter their gait, conferring new advantages and disadvantages. We flew pigeons (Columba livia) through an array of vertical obstacles in a flight arena, presenting them with this choice. The pigeons selected either a strategy involving only a slight pause in the normal wing beat cycle, or a wings-folded posture granting reduced efficiency but greater stability should a misjudgment lead to collision. The more stable but less efficient flight strategy was not used to traverse easy obstacles with wide gaps for passage but came to dominate the postures used as obstacle challenge increased with narrower gaps and there was a greater chance of a collision. These results indicate that birds weigh potential obstacle negotiation strategies and estimate task difficulty during locomotor pattern selection. Explore further Feral pigeon (Columba livia) in flight. Credit: Alan D. Wilson/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 2.5 © 2015 Phys.org City dwellers know that pigeons are some of the best flyers around, unlike robins and other birds, pigeons rarely collide with cars, buildings, trees or any other obstacle. That skill has not gone unnoticed—scientists and engineers have been working for years to duplicate their abilities. In this new effort, Williams and Biewener taught some of their tamed specimens to fly through a corridor to get to a meal, then introduced obstacles and high speed cameras to find out how it is that the birds are so good at avoiding objects in their path.The obstacles were plastic pipes, placed vertically some distance apart from one another. To pass between the pipes, the birds had to scrunch themselves a bit, but how they did so, the researchers found, depended on how far apart the pipes were. They noted that when the pipes were at least a half a wing length apart, the birds lifted their wings as if to flap as they approached the obstacle, but then held them steady, above their heads as they passed between the pipes, then flapped down as soon as they were through—a technique that led to very little loss of altitude, which meant it was quite efficient. But if the pipes were moved closer together, they pulled their wings into their body, a less efficient approach, but one much less likely to result in wing damage. To make sure the first approach was not merely coincident based on where the wings were when the birds arrived at the obstacle, the researchers filmed them multiple times, finding the same result each time.Because the birds used two different techniques for allowing them safe passage through the pipe obstacles, based on what they observed as they approached, the researchers believe that choosing which technique to use was a deliberate act, which meant the birds somehow made a choice of which technique to use, just before they passed through—very impressive, especially when noting that birds, except for some such as crows or magpies, are not generally known for their smarts. Citation: Study shows one reason why pigeons so rarely crash (2015, March 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-pigeons-rarely.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Researchers conduct study to determine impact of using drones to study birds This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Harvard University has uncovered one of the secrets behind pigeons’ impressive flight abilities. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, David Williams and Andrew Biewener describe how they videotaped some of the birds flying through an obstacle course they made, and what they found when they examined the footage.last_img read more

Pop theatre Manto flavour of NSD fest

first_imgThe crossover between literature, performance, classicism and its modern interpretations will be on showcase at the 15th Bharat Rang Mahotsav, the National School of Drama’s (NSD) annual theatre festival.The festival will celebrate the legacy Saadat Hasan Manto, William Shakespeare and popular theatre in the perspective of the modern Indian stage.Announcing the 15-day theatre gala, NSD chairperson Amal Allana said the festival will bring to the Capital and twin venue of Jaipur a total of 87 plays, lectures, interactions, offsite projects and special packages. It will open with Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Atmakatha, a two-hour play directed by Vinay Sharma, featuring former Bollywood actor Kulbhushan Kharbanda. It will mark the actor’s return to the stage, Allana said. ‘The wider variety of plays this year has allowed us to package them into categories. The ‘Manto section’ has six plays adapted from stories by Manto and the section on Shakespeare will explore the ‘inter-cultural influence on the dramatist’ with seven productions,’ Allana said, adding: ‘The focus will be on popular theatre that evolved from the Parsi form of theatre in the second half of 19th century.’ The 450 entries from which 87 were shortlisted were from across regions and genres that were not always ‘dependent on the government for support’. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe Indian panorama with 11 productions and 52 other performances — adaptations, re-visitings, improvisations, devised plays and traditional renditions — will reflect contemporary theatre practises. The Shakespeare panorama will play host to the likes of indigenous improvisations of King Lear, a solo performance from Turkmenistan, an Assamese adaptation of Julius Caeser, a Hindi makeover of Twelfth Night, Piya Behroopia that played at the Globe Theatre in London last season, Footsbarn Theatre’s Indian Tempest as physical theatre. Wendy Jehlen of the US will present excerpts from Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and Titus Andronicus in a choreographed non-verbal piece as The Knocking Within.A Malayalee adaptation, Yamadoothu: After the Death of Othello in Malayalam from Kerala, based on Shakespeare’s Othello will also be staged. Pointing to the trends in Indian contemporary theatre, Amal Allana said: ‘the trend to go back to traditional forms of theatre has waned’.‘We don’t have to go back to folk theatre and traditional theatre to sustain contemporary theatre. Plays are being staged as performances and devised scripts. There is more exchange and effort between theatre people because of greater a sense of participation and lack of original scripts,’ Allana said.She said: ‘The complexity of new theatre has brought in wake more non-verbal plays and physical theatre’. NSD director Anuradha Kapur said ‘there was a flowering of another kind of script that were meant to be read. We are reading scripts and performing them as well’. Bharat Rang mahotsav will feature plays divided into several categories.last_img read more

A New AllInOne Printer from Lexmark

first_img This story appears in the February 2011 issue of . Subscribe » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » January 25, 2011 Lexmark GenesisPhoto © David JohnsonThe all-in-one business printer/fax machine/scanner is becoming a work of art.The touch-activated Lexmark Genesis pushes the bounds of small-business imaging both in performance and good looks. The 15-inch-by-16-inch Genesis is about half the size of an average all-in-one printer. It holds pages vertically, so it can scan both sides of a document in a zippy three seconds. And the unit, which connects directly to the web, is controlled via a slick 4.3-inch touch-activated screen that’s about the size of an iPhone.Performance is solid, with high quality and decent speed: 33 pages per minute in black and white, and 30 pages in color. But what really makes the Genesis unique is its design. Its attractive black form factor looks more like a high-end audio component than a printer, yet it doesn’t compromise its image quality or functionality for light business use.The Genesis is far from perfect. The vertical page layout can be clumsy when lots of copies are required, and it is not a battle-tested concept for printers. (Who knows how hinges, hardware and electronics will hold up after years in the office?) And then there is the cost: $400, in a world where $60 buys a lot of printer.But for folks who want their printers to make a statement, the Genesis is an intriguing option.last_img read more