Help stop human trafficking, slavery

first_imgJanuary has been designated as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month to better focus attention on this horrific crime and the exploited victims whose lives are forever changed.Many of our state and local politicians have been so very instrumental in co-sponsoring and/or supporting various bills which treat survivors of human trafficking as the victims they are, rather than as criminals. I would personally like to thank: Schenectady Mayor Gary McCarthy, City Councilman Ed Kosiur, state Sens. George A. Amedore and James Tedisco, Assemblymen Angelo Santabarbara and Phillip Steck, U.S. Sens. Kirstin Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer, and Rep. Paul Tonko. Since its inception in 1985, Safe Inc. of Schenectady, located at 1344 Albany St., has been at the forefront of providing emergency shelter and outreach services to more than 8,000 adolescents, teens and young adults.Its two highly regarded programs, Safe House — a co-ed youth shelter for homeless, runaway and other at-risk youth — and Project Safe, a continuum of services including counseling, health and wellness care, job training and life skills development (for ages 18-35), offer positive alternatives to street life where sexual exploitation and victimization are so rampant.Safe Inc. of Schenectady is the designee for New York state’s Safe Harbour initiative in Schenectady County. Safe Inc. of Schenectady has developed a collaborative task force, a community awareness campaign, provides case assessment referrals in collaboration with the County Multidisciplinary Team and Child Advocacy Center, refines interview strategies for the Department of Social Services and Safe Inc., and trains all staff in trauma-focused care.Barbara DworkinSchenectadyThe writer is board president of Safe Inc. of Schenectady.More from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineSchenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsSchenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Australia’s Victoria requires masks for Melbourne hit by COVID-19

first_imgPeople in Melbourne must now wear masks when leaving their homes as Victoria, Australia’s second most-populous state, marked two weeks of triple-digit increases in new coronavirus infections on Sunday.Melbournians not wearing face coverings will be fined A$200 ($140), said Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews.Victoria, which has forced nearly 5 million people into a partial six-week lockdown on July 9, reported 363 new cases of the coronavirus on Sunday, after 217 cases the previous day. “We’re going to be wearing masks in Victoria and potentially in other parts of the country for a very long time,” Andrews told a televised briefing.”There’s no vaccine to this wildly infectious virus,” he said. Masks are “a simple thing, but it’s about changing habits, it’s about becoming a simple part of your routine.”Australia has recorded about 11,800 cases of COVID-19, a fraction of what has been seen in other countries or even some US states, but an outbreak of community transmission in Victoria has been growing, prompting authorities to restrict social distancing.Three COVID-19 deaths were reported in Victoria on Sunday, bringing the total to 38 and raising Australia’s death toll to 121.New South Wales, the most populous state, has seen new cases in the low double digits in recent weeks and growing. Health officials are concerned about the transmission rate, which they say is higher than in Victoria.About 60 people in Sydney face a fine of $1,000 each after attending a party Saturday night and breaking the public health guidelines of no more than 20 visitors to a home, police said. Topics :last_img read more