Supreme Court Justices to Attend LCC Prayer Service Today

first_imgJustices of the Supreme Court of Liberia, including Chief Justice Francis Korkpor, will today join members of the Liberian Council of Churches (LCC) for another round of intercessory prayers for Liberia.This Friday’s will mark the LCC’s seventh prayer service since it began praying for the nation in a National Prayer Campaign against Ebola.The one-hour Weekly Prayer Service, which is open to the public and begins at 12 noon, was inaugurated by Vice President Joseph N. Boakai.  VP Boakai launched the Ebola prayer campaign in the Providence Baptist Church Shrine, the nation’s oldest church edifice, where the services have been taking place since September 5.During the launch, the VP said that historically Liberians have sought the intervention of the Almighty when faced with great difficulty.“When all else is failing, the only place to turn to is the Almighty God, who is forever listening to our prayers,” Vice President Boakai declared.Citing Biblical references for the occasion, the VP pointed out that the battle against Ebola is the Lord’s. A call to unceasing prayer is not a call to constant prayers, but to persistent and consistent prayers. “The effectual fervent prayer of the righteous availeth much,” he said, quoting the Epistle of James.According to Apostle Dr. J. Adolphus During, chairman of the LCC’s National Prayer Committee, other major stakeholders have followed the Vice President in attending the prayer services.Dr. During disclosed that today, Justices of the Supreme Court have assured him that they would follow suit and attend the service to join in praying for the nation.Chairman During said while the Weekly Prayer Service focuses mainly on prayer against Ebola in the sub region and for peace and stability, “a holistic prayer is often made for Liberia.”According to him, these calamities were befalling the nation because Liberia has sinned against God, naming the sins of neglect, ingratitude and others as some of the sins, Liberians have committed against God. During the civil war, we prayed and God answered us, but as soon as we settled down, we forgot God,” Dr. During charged.Dr. During, who is the founder of the Soul Cleansing Clinic of Jesus Christ, told this newspaper that a few days before the nation observed a three-day fast and prayer, MSF and Samaritan’s Purse had threatened to pull out of Liberia.   But after calling on God to intervene, that decision changed, “ZMAPP came and the tremendous goodwill from the international community, including America, began to pour in.”The Weekly Prayer Service will run for the next three months under the theme ‘A Call to Unceasing Prayers,” taken from the Holy Bible books of I Chronicles 19:13 and I Thessalonians 5:17.According to Liberian history, the Providence Baptist Shrine, which is the small edifice overlooking Broad Street, has been used as a place of intercessory prayer whenever the nation was faced with a national crises.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Insider Trading: Chelsea duo on the verge of exit, Leicester City target Eder and more

first_imgtalkSPORT’s transfer guru, Warren Haughton, joins Hawksbee and Jacobs to round up all the very latest rumours and gossip from the January window.First discussed is the impending exit of Ramires from Chelsea with the Brazilian keen to move to Chinese Super League side Jiangsu Suning for £20m.Joining Ramires on his way out of Stamford Bridge is Loic Remy with it understood that league leaders Leicester City interested in bringing the striker in on loan until the end of the season.Alternatively, the Foxes could turn their attentions to Serie A and Sampdoria striker Eder with the club believed to have tabled an £8m offer for the Brazilian.And Warren also discusses the futures of Graziano Pelle and Bafetimbi Gomis.Here are the latest transfer stories from talkSPORT.com:Chelsea transfer news: Ramires on verge of £20m move to China Chelsea transfer latest: Christian Atsu to join Malaga on loan Arsenal set to fight off Chelsea and Liverpool to land teen sensation Kylian MbappeLeicester transfer report: Premier League leaders table £8m bid for Serie A hotshot Eder Transfer report: PSG defender Gregory van der Wiel stalls on new deal amid interest from Chelsea and Manchester United Transfer report: Arsenal defender Mathieu Debuchy keen to join Aston Villa on loan Tottenham transfer news: Paris Saint-Germain rebuff loan bid for young striker Swindon Town keen to wrap up permanent deal for Liverpool goalkeeper Lawrence Vigouroux Fulham step closer to signing Austria defender Michael Madl as club confirm medicallast_img read more

Dairy aid helps, but not enough

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) needs to better reflect the dairy-farm incomes lost to tariff retaliation when it calculates its next round of trade mitigation payments, the said today.In a letter sent Tuesday to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, National Milk Producers Federation Chairman and dairy farmer Randy Mooney cited four studies illustrating that milk producers have experienced more than $1 billion in lost income since May, when the retaliatory tariffs were first placed on dairy goods in response to U.S. levies on foreign products. In contrast, the first round of USDA trade mitigation payments, announced in August, allocated only $127 million to dairy farmers.“We are ever-grateful for your advocacy on agricultural trade, which is crucial to the economic health of our industry,” wrote Mooney, who operates Mooney Dairy in Rogersville, Missouri, with his wife, Jan. “However, our members are greatly concerned about the level of aid that was provided in the initial effort.”The letter details four analyses, including two independent studies using sophisticated economic modeling, that each show losses to dairy producers far above USDA’s initial payment level.NMPF analyzed the CME dairy futures-based milk prices through the end of 2018, based on the settlement prices in late May, just before retaliatory tariffs were announced, with those same prices after tariffs had been thoroughly incorporated into market expectations.  The expected impact of the retaliation may result in roughly $1.5 billion in lost revenue for producers during the second half of 2018.USDA’s own monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) showed a drop in its forecast milk prices for the full 2018 calendar year of $0.70/cwt., after the imposition of the tariffs. The WASDE estimate amounts to a loss in dairy farm income of $1.5 billion for the year.An Informa Agribusiness Consulting study estimated that the tariffs would lower U.S. dairy farm income by $1.5 billion for the full year 2018.The Center for North American Studies at Texas A&M University, estimated an annual loss of $1.17 billion.“These estimates show that farmer losses from the tariffs will notably exceed $1 billion in 2018,” Mooney wrote. “Significant income losses will continue” if tariffs imposed by Mexico and China — two of the largest dairy export markets for the United States — remain in place.Perdue has said a second trade mitigation payment to producers may be made this year, after additional calculations of farmer losses.“We are eager to work with you on a plan that better reflects the struggles dairy producers across the country have faced due to the tariffs,” Mooney wrote. “Thank you for considering the critical implications of these trade challenges for us as dairy farmers and cooperative owners.”last_img read more

Pandora Partners With…Clear Channel?

first_imgUpdated at 1pm PST with quote from Pandora founder Tim Westergren below. Updated August 4th with comment from Clear Channel PR.Streaming music service Pandora has entered into an ad sales partnership with a subsidiary of media conglomerate Clear Channel, a move that should help ensure the service’s long-term financial viability but will likely lead to more ads in the stream and criticism of the independent company for getting in bed with the widely disliked mega-firm.AdAge provided in-depth coverage of the partnership in a report this morning. A zoom out to look at the criticism that Clear Channel has faced and how this impacts music fans is worthwhile as well.Criticisms of Clear ChannelClear Channels’ alleged monopolistic practices have long been criticized in a variety of related industries, including billboards, concert venues and radio stations. The company’s image as a faceless corporate bureaucracy dangerous to the well being of local communities is well illustrated by anecdotes like the following, from Project Censored‘s most under-discussed stories of 2004 collection:“In January 2002, a train carrying 10,000 gallons of anhydrous ammonia derailed in the town of Minot, causing a spill and a toxic cloud. Authorities attempted to warn the residents of Minot to stay indoors and to avoid the spill. But when the authorities called six of the seven radio stations in Minot to issue the warning, no one answered the phones. As it turned out, Clear Channel owned all six of the stations and none of the station’s personnel were available at the time. “The company’s extensive ownership of radio stations has also raised concerns about censorship. After September 11th, 2001 the company famously circulated a list of songs to all its stations that it said should only be played after great thought, including Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin’,” Louis Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World” and the entire Rage Against the Machine discography.Those are but a few of the many criticisms of Clear Channel. Some users will no doubt be concerned that the same culture will now influence Pandora. That deal will only concern ad sales, the company says, but it’s hard to believe the money connection won’t have at least subtle consequences in other parts of the business.Helping Pandora ThriveStreaming music recommendation service Pandora is wildly popular but has been unsure about its own survival for some time because of the high licensing fees it has been forced by the music industry to pay. Last month the situation appeared to have been resolved, though not without controversy.The new deal with Clear Channel will no doubt make it more likely that Pandora can survive and thrive. It will presumably also mean that there will be more ads in the music stream. The company’s ad-free desktop music player does not appear to be selling well, though appearances could be deceiving. We’ve requested comment from Pandora and will update this post when we hear from them.In the meantime, it’s a situation that many music fans will have complicated feelings about. “It’s a conundrum,” prominent music industry blogger Dave Allen told us by phone this morning. “I’m a big believer in being able to access anything from the cloud, but it still seems early days. Clear Channel, though, that’s a tough one for indie music fans to swallow.”Update: Pandora founder Tim Westergren emailed us the following response:The deal is with [Clear Channel subsidiary] Katz, not Clear Channel. It’s really most akin to an ad network deal (think DoubleClick for audio). It has no bearing on a relationship with Clear Channel (just as using DoubleClick has no implications for a relationship with Google), and will have no impact on our longstanding audio ad strategy – which will continue to be short, tasteful and infrequent. It just allows us to take advantage of an established network of sales folks as we ramp our team to keep up with the growth.We’ll leave it to readers to decide whether they buy that.Update: A PR representative from Clear Channel emailed the following response to this post as well. With regards to the situation in Minot, the public-notification failures connected with the Minot train derailment were a direct result of the local authorities’ failure to install their Emergency Alert System equipment. Instead of using the equipment – which would have allowed authorities to automatically break into the broadcast – as specified by the Emergency Alert System and as successfully done locally by the National Weather service MANY times – the local authorities attempted to use phone lines that were jammed with citizens. That is why the government abandoned the phone-based emergency “broadcast” system seven (7) years before the Minot incident happened. When the truth finally came to light, the local authorities privately apologized to local Clear Channel managers for lying to the media and Congress about the incident — a subsequent Congressional inquiry confirmed that local authorities were at fault that night and that Clear Channel Radio employees went above and beyond their professional responsibilities in responding to this serious situation, during and after the incident occurred.Additionally, Clear Channel does not ban songs – and the company has third-party spins data to prove it. There is no truth to that rumor – there was no list issued by the company after 9/11. An email from a local programmer who had just lost his son was sent to a couple of his colleagues who were programming similar formats describing his personal experience with his overwhelming grief. It was not an official list distributed by the company – in no way, shape or form. 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Tags:#Features#music#news#NYT#web Related Posts 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex…center_img 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout marshall kirkpatrick 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

Can We Prepare for Climate Impacts Without Creating Financial Chaos?

first_imgThis post originally appeared at Ensia There is a perverse and hidden danger from climate change that few people, even those who unquestionably accept the science, know how to deal with. Someday, likely sooner than we think, the destruction that warmer global temperatures are inflicting — through record floods, wildfires, droughts, and hurricanes — could physically overwhelm our ability to maintain many communities in their existing forms. But by talking openly about this, and taking the necessary steps to address it, communities open the door to another danger. If markets suddenly value the risk of climate change properly, it could lead to a mass withdrawal of investment that kills real estate values, dries up tax revenue, and leads to a wider financial crisis.RELATED ARTICLESA New Strategy for Drought-Stressed Cities2018 Was a Big Year for Natural DisastersA New Congress and New Hope for Flood Insurance ReformBuilding Resilience for a ‘Close Encounter’ with DisasterClimate Change Resilience Could Save Trillions That is the reality confronting Ted Becker, the mayor of Lewes, Delaware, a town of about 3,000 people in which some buildings sit just steps from the Atlantic oceanfront. “When you live here every day, and you see things change, it’s hard to accept that climate change isn’t happening,” he says. Flooding that can deluge low-lying properties and make roads impassable is becoming much more frequent. Of the 549 flood days in Lewes since the 1950s, more than 200 have taken place in the past 15 years. The town has rewritten building codes so homes in flood-prone areas are built higher off the ground. About a year and a half ago it took the more aggressive step of abandoning plans to develop several roads and properties in Lewes Beach, the mayor says. The proportion of Delaware land area exposed to coastal flooding — 5.4% — is expected to grow to 7.1% within three decades because of rising seas. By then, just for the 771 homes built between 2010 and 2017, chronic flooding could imperil $526 million worth of coastal real estate. The number of homes at risk could surpass 23,000 by 2100 in the worst-case scenario. So far, neither investors nor homeowners seem to be fully incorporating this risk. “I’m not aware of anybody who has said I’m not coming here because of that,” Becker says. But market forces could quickly alter this perception — for example, if flood insurance were to more accurately reflect the costs of climate change or is scaled back in high-risk areas entirely. “Then I’m sure people will rethink whether or not they want to build in this area,” Becker says. “I think that’s a challenge that’s out there.” The dilemma that communities face — how to prepare for the impacts of climate change without scaring away homeowners and investors and setting off a damaging economic spiral — is increasingly urgent anywhere those impacts are manifesting. Experts in coastal inundation, destructive wildfires, and financially destabilizing droughts say there is no easy answer. But the best way to improve our long-term odds of survival while preventing a near-term financial fallout, they say, is to fully accept the dangers ahead. Communities that begin preparing for those dangers today will be much better positioned to thrive in a perilous 21st century than those that wait.   Reluctant to speak Last year, the Union of Concerned Scientists published a report giving a national context to the risks Lewes faces. About 147,000 coastal homes and 7,000 commercial properties across the U.S. worth $63 billion could be chronically flooded by rising seas within 15 years. That number might rise to 311,000 homes by mid-century. “That was something that we felt was just really flying under the radar,” says Erika Spanger-Siegfried, senior analyst with the group’s climate and energy program. Defensive measures like seawalls can be prohibitively expensive and may have to protect long stretches of coastline to be effective. The reality that many homes and buildings will be difficult — or perhaps impossible — to defend against rising seas is only beginning to penetrate the mainstream awareness of investors, developers, insurers, and elected officials. “By and large, it’s still fair to say that the majority of the [U.S.] coastline isn’t acting on this information,” Spanger-Siegfried says. But a sudden revaluation of market risk that leads to a pullout of investment isn’t necessarily desirable either. “When enough major market actors become aware of and begin to act on these risks, it could potentially trigger a regional housing market crisis, or even a more widespread economic crisis,” the report reads. This is why some policymakers have been reluctant to speak openly about chronic flooding. “When I was in the White House, there was talk of, ‘How much do we really want [these risks] to be widely known?’” Alice Hill, a former special assistant to President Barack Obama and a research fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, has said. “It could be just a mass realization that all of this property is severely compromised. That would be highly destabilizing to real estate markets.” Spanger-Siegfried says policymakers have no choice these days but to deliberately, and carefully, scale back investment in the riskiest regions and redirect it to safer ones. It could mean the federal government permanently reduces flood insurance coverage, buys out homeowners in exposed areas, or, in some cases, develops entirely new communities further inland. “This is going to be a really important policy frontier for us in the coming decades,” Spanger-Siegfried says. Slow-going process Edith Hannigan also stares down existential threats — but on the other side of the country. Originally from flood-prone New Jersey, Hannigan is a land-use planning program manager at the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection. “I grew up in this flooding and stormwater protection context and now I work in wildfires, but it’s still kind of the same goals underlying my work,” she says. Fires are becoming more frequent and cataclysmic in California due to increasingly warm and dry conditions. Of the 20 largest that have charred the state since the 1930s, most have occurred in the past two decades. A record-smashing wildfire season in 2017 killed at least 46 people and left $20 billion in losses. Fires in 2018 killed nearly 100 people and wreaked $24 billion worth of damage. Hannigan sees a sharp increase in public awareness of fire risks. “You just can’t ignore it anymore,” she says. She helps communities prepare for danger, especially those built where urban areas transition into wildlands. But even when communities take all the precautions — removing flammable trees, for example, or leaving 30 to 100 feet (9 to 30 meters) of “defensible space” on each side of a home — they can still burn to the ground, as Santa Rosa’s Fountaingrove neighborhood did last year. In March, Munich Re became the first major insurance company to explicitly link California’s wildfires to climate change. “If the risk from wildfires, flooding, storms, or hail is increasing, then the only sustainable option we have is to adjust our risk prices accordingly,” Ernst Rauch, the insurer’s chief climatologist, told the Guardian. The real estate industry is watching closely. A new report from the Urban Land Institute warns that some “locations, and even entire metropolitan areas, [can] become less appealing because of climate-change-related events, leading to the potential for individual assets to become obsolete.” Navigating these twin physical and financial dangers is potentially much harder in the case of wildfires than for coastal flooding, where risks are more predictable. “You don’t know how or where the next fire is going to strike,” Hannigan says. But if wildfires keep getting worse in California, as the climate science predicts, communities are going to have to take a hard look at “what type of risk they’re willing to put their residents in,” Hannigan says. Still, she continues, when it comes to land-use decisions, “getting a mindset change at a large scale in California, probably anywhere in the country, is going to be a slow-going process.” No great answer That’s certainly true of tense negotiations, which began in 2015 and wrapped up this March, among seven Southwest U.S. states to respond to a 19-year Colorado River drought and prevent the federal government from imposing mandatory water restrictions. Climate change is a major factor in the river and its reservoirs being at their driest period in 1,200 years. A 2014 report from Arizona State University estimated that one year without water from the river could cause $1.4 trillion in economic losses and impact 16 million jobs across the region. If calculations were done again today, those estimates of damage “would definitely be bigger,” says Timothy James, a co-author of the report.   Deals reached this spring among Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, and California resulted in states agreeing to take less water from the Colorado River basin. But this is just the beginning of a long-term process to figure out our survival in an era of escalating climate change. “What would we do if we lived in a more water-constrained environment?” James says. The technical fixes are easiest to predict: more water-efficient technologies and policies like higher prices on water to encourage their adoption. But adapting to climate change also requires hard decisions about the pace and scale of development. It could mean refraining from building new communities in the desert altogether. At the moment, however, Phoenix is growing rapidly.   For how long is debatable. Though a wet winter has temporarily eased fears that Lake Mead, a crucial reservoir along the Colorado River, could become dry enough to trigger a first-ever shortage declaration next year, the close call puts into stark reality just how fine a line many places are walking as climate change becomes more intense. In this context, according to the Urban Land Institute report, “leading investment managers and institutional investors are undertaking flood, resilience, and climate vulnerability scans of their portfolios” — including evaluating the financial risks of water stress and extreme heat. Vulnerable cities like Phoenix face not only looming water shortages, then, but also an investment flight that could potentially accompany them. How can communities properly respond to these sorts of dangers beyond mere short-term fixes? “You know, I don’t have a great answer,” James says. Soon enough, climate change could force us to provide one. Geoff Dembicki is a climate journalist and author.last_img read more

10 months agoMan City boss Guardiola tribute to Sterling after goalscoring cameo

first_imgMan City boss Guardiola tribute to Sterling after goalscoring cameoby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola was pleased to see Raheem Sterling on the scoresheet for victory over Everton.Sterling came off the bench to score in the 3-1 win.”Raheem – when he has no time to think in front of goal – he’s always good,” Guardiola said.”The cross was amazing from Fernandinho and it was a great finish. We are not the tallest team in the world but after just a few minutes, it was an important goal for him and everyone. “I see him so calm. I think he has handled the last years in many situations and rumours – not nice things about him or his family or the colour of his skin. I admire him and appreciate that it’s not easy for him.”He’s loved by all staff and in the locker room.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoMan City winger Sterling adamant they can beat Liverpool

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man City winger Sterling adamant they can beat Liverpoolby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City winger Raheem Sterling is adamant they can stop runaway Premier League leaders Liverpool.Sterling is undaunted about facing Jurgen Klopp’s rampant Reds, who have reeled off nine straight wins to open up a seven-point lead in the title race.”If we can play the way we know we can play, we can beat anyone,” said a defiant Sterling. “It’s going to be a great game on Thursday and we’re all ­looking forward to it.“The last three games we started well and scored the opening goal and then we were sloppy, but our mentality was good against Southampton and we showed a good fighting spirit.”There was a bit of luck as well, but we played some great football and controlled the game, which we know we can do. It’s up to us to keep that focus and go on to the next one.” last_img read more

9 months agoChelsea striker Giroud: Cesc a great opportunity for Monaco

first_imgChelsea striker Giroud: Cesc a great opportunity for Monacoby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveOlivier Giroud has no doubts former Chelsea teammate Cesc Fabregas will be a success with AS Monaco.Cesc left Chelsea last week for ASM and made his debut in last night’s 1-1 draw at Olympique Marseille.Giroud told Telefoot: “Cesc is a great player, he has this quality of vision of the game, of intelligence of passes. “He’s one of the best players I’ve played with. “This is a great opportunity for Monaco.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoChelsea midfielder Barkley admits Lampard inspired him as a youngster

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea midfielder Barkley admits Lampard inspired him as a youngsterby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea midfielder Ross Barkley admits manager Frank Lampard inspired him as a youngster.Nobody else can say they have grown up watching Lampard on television, then played alongside him in an England shirt, and now continue to learn off him in his role as Chelsea boss.”As a young lad I would watch Match of the Day on a Sunday morning and then go off to my games for Everton,” he told chelseafc.com.”I’d see the likes of Rooney, Lampard, Gerrard banging the goals in every week. Lampard was one of my idols, because as a young midfielder I would see the goals he was scoring or creating every week and look up to him.”I played with the manager later on in his career with England and you could see how motivated he was. It was hard work all the time, running after training, non-stop movement to receive the ball, scoring goals. As a young player seeing that it affects you. You want to do the same things.”He’s taken that into his management. We work really hard and then on the right days we ease off and feel really good for the games.” last_img read more

25 days ago​Wijnaldum happy Liverpool grinding out results

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Wijnaldum happy Liverpool grinding out resultsby Freddie Taylor25 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool midfielder Gini Wijnaldum is delighted by the consistency shown by the Reds this season.They have managed to win their first seven games of the season, building a five-point cushion over Manchester City in the process.Wijnaldum is not too concerned if some of their wins are scrappy, such as the 1-0 success over Sheffield United this weekend.”We wanted to create a chance but I think they defended really good,” the 28-year-old told the club’s official website.”We were not at our best to create chances today. We had a few but it was more because they made mistakes.”But all that matters at the end of the day is we have the three points. Especially at the early stage of the season, you have to make sure that you collect as many points as possible because normally during the season you get better and better.”In the beginning of the season you are not at your best, so that’s why it’s good that we collect points.” last_img read more