The Story of McScam and Professional Canners Stories That Fascinated Us This

first_img Entrepreneur Staff Enroll Now for $5 The staff of Entrepreneur.com share the articles we loved from other publications. Next Article –shares August 10, 2018 Entrepreneur Staff Add to Queue 2 min read Image credit: Bloomberg | Getty Images Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Net neutrality activists, not hackers, crashed the FCC’s comment systemRemember when Net Neutrality was a thing? Remember when a lot of people tried to save it last May, but then the FCC’s comment system crashed? At the time, the agency suggested it was a coordinated attack by hackers. Now, they’re saying it was system overload — largely caused by a Last Week Tonight segment by John Oliver. Who said TV is dying? — Hayden FieldBehind Hollywood’s A-List Bidding War for a McDonald’s Monopoly ArticleI was fascinated by the original article “McScam: How an Ex-Cop Rigged McDonald’s Monopoly Game and Stole Millions.” But, the backstory on how the article’s author and a partner deliberately “planted” the story as a way to get Hollywood to bid for the movie rights — which ultimately led to a payday as big as the McDonald’s Monopoly Game grand prize — is just as captivating. It just goes to show the power of the press in promoting your business venture, and how sometimes it pays to reach potential investors in unconventional ways. — Liz WebberInside The World Of NYC ‘Canners’ Who Survive By Collecting Recyclable Cans & BottlesIt’s stories like these that are both wholly inspiring and downright depressing. Some of the individuals spotlighted by author Francesca Berardi work up to 10 hours, constantly on the move. Members of this profession — finding bottles and cans to earn up to five cents each — include a range of people from struggling addicts to parents. It’s a slice of New York City life that most of us are witness to, but never think about. — Stephen J. Bronner The Story of ‘McScam’ and Professional Canners: Stories That Fascinated Us This Week Fascinating Stories Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brandlast_img read more

Russian Dominos Ends Promotion That Gave Away Pizza to People Who Got

first_imgFood Businesses September 12, 2018 Next Article Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Register Now » Russian Domino’s Ends Promotion That Gave Away Pizza to People Who Got Domino’s Tattoos Because It Was Too Popular Add to Queue Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. –sharescenter_img There is brand loyalty, and then there’s brand loyalty.A Domino’s franchisee in Russia decided to award 100 free pizzas each year for 100 years to customers that got tattoos of the restaurant chain’s logo. The only stipulation was that tattoos had to be visible.The campaign was originally intended to run from Aug. 31 to Oct. 31, but the lure of free pizza in perpetuity proved to be a strong motivator for people to get some red and blue ink, so much so that contest had to be, very quickly, capped.Related: Did Your Customers Get Tattoos of Your Logo? These Did.”Friends, we already have 350 participants!” the Domino’s location posted on Facebook on Sept. 10. “We are not receiving any new tattoos! If you are at a tattoo artist’s and getting tattoos, we will include you in the list of participants. But we are waiting for pictures before 12:00 today.”Customers got pretty creative with their tattoo designs. Many included the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, those crime-fighting, pizza-loving reptiles.This isn’t the first time that a brand has inspired this kind of, permanent, likely somewhat painful love. Anytime Fitness, the global gym franchise, has seen many of its customers get a tattoo of their logo to show their passion for the company.Is there a brand that you would get a tattoo of? Let us know in the comments. Image credit: NurPhoto | Getty Images Nina Zipkin Staff Writer. Covers leadership, media, technology and culture. 2 min read Entrepreneur Staff A Russian Domino’s franchisee’s promise of free pizza in exchange for a visible logo tattoo quickly got out of hand.last_img read more

Why Do So Many Americans Now Support Legalizing Marijuana

first_imgLegal Marijuana Keep up with the latest trends and news in the cannabis industry with our free articles and videos, plus subscribe to the digital edition of Green Entrepreneur magazine. May 14, 2019 –shares By Amy Adamczyk, Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice, City University of New York; Christopher Thomas, Ph.D Candidate in Criminal Justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and Jacob Felson, Associate Professor of Sociology, William Paterson UniversityAmerican views on marijuana have shifted incredibly rapidly. Thirty years ago, cannabis legalization seemed like a lost cause. In 1988, only 24 percent of Americans supported legalization.But steadily, the nation began to liberalize. By 2018, 66 percent of U.S. residents offered their approval, transforming marijuana legalization from a libertarian fantasy into a mainstream cause. Many state laws have changed as well. Over the last quarter-century, 10 states have legalized recreational marijuana, while 22 states have legalized medical marijuana.So why has public opinion changed dramatically in favor of legalization? In a study published this February, we examined a range of possible reasons, finding that the media likely had the greatest influence.It’s Not About Use, Geography, or DemographicsOur study ruled out a few obvious possibilities.For one, it’s not about marijuana use. Yes, cannabis use has increased. Data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health show that, in 2002, about 10 percent of adults reported using cannabis the previous year. By 2015, 13.5 percent reported using. But that increase is too small to have had much of an impact on attitudes.And it’s not about older, more conservative Americans being replaced by younger generations who are more familiar with marijuana. Both younger and older people developed more liberal views about the legalization of marijuana at a similar pace over the last 30 years. In this way, changes in attitudes about marijuana legalization mirror recent increases in support for LGBTQ individuals.We looked to see if people who lived in states where it was illegal, but resided next to ones where it became legal, were more likely to have changed their views. But the rate of change has been no different in states that legalized marijuana than in others.Likewise, the pace of change has been similar across political parties, religions, educational levels, racial and ethnic groups and gender. As politically polarized as the country may seem, when it comes to marijuana, Americans have been changing their attitudes together, as a nation.We did find that a small part of the increase in support was related to more people disaffiliating with religion. The proportion of people who do not identify with a religion has increased some, by about 7 percent between 2007 and 2014. People who do not have a religion tend to be more liberal than others. However, this factor accounts for only a small proportion of the change.Media Medical FramingSo what’s going on? What has likely made the biggest difference is how the media has portrayed marijuana. Support for legalization began to increase shortly after the news media began to frame cannabis as a medical issue.We took The New York Times as a case study, looking at the number of published articles from 1983 to 2015 about marijuana. Just before the number of Americans supporting legalization began to increase, we found a sharp increase in the proportion of articles about marijuana that discussed its medical uses.In the 1980s, the vast majority of New York Times stories about marijuana were about drug trafficking and abuse or other Schedule I drugs. At that time, The New York Times was more likely to lump marijuana together in a kind of unholy trinity with cocaine and heroin in discussions about drug smuggling, drug dealers and the like.During the 1990s, stories discussing marijuana in criminal terms became less prevalent. Meanwhile, the number of articles discussing the medical uses of marijuana slowly increased. By the late 1990s, marijuana was rarely discussed in the context of drug trafficking and drug abuse. And marijuana had lost its association with other Schedule I drugs like cocaine and heroin in the New York Times. Gradually, the stereotypical persona of the marijuana user shifted from the stoned slacker wanting to get high to the aging boomer seeking pain relief.Of course, many Americans do not read The New York Times. But analysis of newspapers of record, like this one, provide insight into how the news media has changed its framing of marijuana, especially during an era when newspapers were still a primary news source.Harsh Criminal Justice SystemAs Americans became more supportive of marijuana legalization, they also increasingly told survey researchers that the criminal justice system was too harsh.In the late 1980s, the “war on drugs” and sentencing reform laws put a large number of young men, often black and Latino, behind bars for lengthy periods of time. As Americans started to feel the full social and economic effects of tough-on-crime initiatives, they reconsidered the problems with criminalizing marijuana.Because support for the legalization of marijuana and concerns about the harshness of the criminal justice system changed at about the same time, it’s difficult to know what came first. Did concern about the harshness of the criminal justice system affect support for legalization – or vice versa?By contrast, the cause and effect is clearer with respect to the media framing of marijuana. The news media’s portrayal of marijuana began to change shortly before the public did, suggesting that the media influenced support for the legalization of marijuana.Once attitudes begin to change, it is difficult to know what keeps the momentum moving. Whatever the initial impetus, attitudes today are drastically more supportive, and legalization is increasing fast.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Why Do So Many Americans Now Support Legalizing Marijuana? Download Our iOS App Image credit: Pacific Press | Getty Imagescenter_img 5 min read Add to Queue Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. As politically polarized as the country is, Americans have been changing their attitudes toward marijuana together, as a nation. Next Article Free Green Entrepreneur Applast_img read more

How to Survive the Worst PC Disasters

first_img Brought to you by PCWorld Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Can’t get your PC to boot? Or just sent your boss a really embarrassing e-mail? Here’s how to recover from these and ten other potential catastrophes. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business May 24, 2007 –shares Next Article 11 min read Readers’ Tales of PC DisastersTo read more users’ PC horror stories or add yours, go to our forum discussion on PC disasters. Also see both our slide show on using HijackThis and a video on salvaging wet gear.’Resuscitating a Dead Hard Drive’ by PC World.com reader Nathan WiestI once had a very perplexing case when I was still in school for my Microcomputer Technology degree. A lady at work had come to me saying that her hard drive would not work at all. Not unusual, since hard drives go bad, and many a hard drive won’t boot because of a virus or some kind of spyware. She was worried because it had a lot of family photos and documents on it, and I didn’t mind the thought of being a hero and saving her drive!As I had suspected, the drive had crashed. There was no booting into Windows, and it made a weird noise. After messing around with it for a couple of hours and doing some research, I was about to say sorry, can’t fix it, but then I stumbled on something: Freezing your hard drive. I had heard of it once before but never actually heard of anyone successfully freezing their hard drive and then retrieving some data. I thought, what the heck, this could be worth it to try, especially since the drive was already gone.We tried it all right. We stuck the thing in a freezer for about 18 hours. It was wrapped in a paper towel and placed inside a plastic baggy, so no condensation would accumulate on any circuits or connectors. When I plugged the thing in to our test computer, I was shocked…it booted up fine and I was able to pull off most of the data she could remember having lost. It didn’t completely make sense to me until afterwards, and most people won’t believe me when I tell them this story, but the metal shrinks when it gets cold, duh! So if the head is touching the platter, then you freeze it, the head may pull away from the platter just enough for you to read the data again. Of course, it only works for about 20 minutes until the drive heats back up, but wow, it was a great way to be a hero!I have used this technique a few times since, not all of the times successful, nor as important, but this is still a very worthwhile procedure. This is just one cool, bizarre, and useful way to reverse a relatively common computer disaster.’Diagnosing a Bad BIOS’ by PC World.com reader Shane MitchellI had no problems with the computer when I went to bed that Sunday night, and it was not used until I came back from classes Monday. I sat down to do my homework with trusty iTunes providing my study tunes for only a few minutes before my sound began to crackle and do its best to act as though it was a radio being jammed before ceasing to work completely. Oftentimes the miracle cure is a quick reboot, so that was my first reaction. But my rocking studyfest was ruined by interference yet again.I decided it was time to upgrade drivers. I had no trouble finding the drivers, but little did I know that finding the drivers would be the last good thing to happen for a while… My first boot back in after the new drivers went well for about 2 seconds after logging in before my computer froze. But then it unfroze. But then it froze again. And……so it…… repeated…..For every two seconds of use I was forced to endure a complete freeze for another two seconds. I managed to pull up Task Manager and see that my processor usage was jumping between 100% and around 0. Now while I am aware that this is a telltale sign of spyware and malware using your processor to perform their nasty deeds, I was reasonably confident in my antivirus and antiadware protection system. But it was growing late, so I powered my computer off for the night.Somehow the problem grew worse overnight. When I next tried to start up my computer, I got as far as the Windows Loading Flag before the computer froze. Hoping for a fluke, I hit the reset button only to have my computer reboot and not even detect that the hard drive with Windows on it existed! A part of me wondered whether I had discovered an incredible new exploit where one could somehow infect the sound card of a computer and have the infection progress to knocking out a hard drive.Not wanting to give up, I powered off the machine again and was luckily able to get the machine to detect the hard drive again and boot into Windows using Safe mode. So I set to work on troubleshooting the hard drive with system restore, deactivating all startup processes and programs save for the Windows necessities as well as using chkdsk and fixmbr from the Windows Recovery Console. Unfortunately, none of this made a difference. Finally, I tried a repair installation, but it could not complete without freezing either.Fortunately, I run a computer with 3 hard drives and enough space to transfer all the music and files I wanted to save from the main hard drive with Windows to a backup drive, so I decided a format was in order. The format went off without a hitch and I managed to get through most of the 70-something updates for Windows for a new installation before I had to do my first reboot. Sure enough, it froze on the loading screen!At this point I decided to replace the SATA cable for the hard drive with a new one, and I even changed the SATA slot the hard drive was on. It booted once with no problems before the loading freeze occured again after the next set of updates. I was still convinced the problem was in the hard drive despite the unusual problems with the sounds and the processor that had happened earlier. However, with the next reboot I lost even my Safe Boot option when my boot halted on the error ‘DISK BOOT FAILURE: INSERT SYSTEM DISC AND PRESS ENTER’.I found out I could bypass this error simply by having my XP CD in the drive and having the system ask me if I wanted to boot from it and just wait for that message to time out before booting to my choice of a frozen loading screen or Safe Mode. At this point I was ready to abandon my SATA drive and install windows on one of my other drives.So I completed my second installation of XP in as many days and got through the updates and a few good boots before THAT hard drive began to have problems! I got the boot hanging error ‘ntldr.sys not found’. It was as though my computer were asking “Do you think I could survive a toss out that second-story window next to you?” I was nearly ready to oblige my computer with an answer to that query when I had a sudden flash of random insight. Could the problem be my BIOS?I decided to try a repair install of the ntldr-crippled hard drive to see if I could get into Windows and attempt to update the BIOS. I suceeded in getting back into Windows and found the nifty Windows Based BIOS Flashing utility that ASUS has on its Web site. The BIOS updated successfully, and the ntldr error was banished back to the void from which such problems originate. I soon found myself back in Windows, and there was much rejoicing!I’ve been using that drive ever since (3 months), and though I never found out what caused these problems, the SATA drive is behaving just fine as data storage with no operating system. I managed to solve the problem without destroying my computer, losing my sanity, or spending a dollar on a replacement part! And now that I’ve monopolized most of the space on this forum page (sorry) I shall end this essay…’Vanished Data–Found’ by PC World.com reader Bob DrakeBack in the days of DOS, I was always rather confident about the security of my hard drive data. I had not one, nor even just two, but three hard drives installed on my machine! One I used for files, the second stored my programs, and the third I used for backing up data. I was religious about it. Several times a day I’d enter a few simple commands and back up everything–programs and data alike–on the third, very large (by standards of the day) hard drive.When Win95 was introduced, I refused to install it for a year. It was important to be certain that the bugs were fixed, and that my system would be safe. After the reports began to settle down and it seemed secure, I decided to make the move.Immediately after installing the OS, my computer began running in “spurts.” It would start, then stop. Start, then stop. Start then… nada. Nothing. Zilch. Irritated, I decided to boot from a DOS disk, reformat the C: drive, and return to DOS. I rebooted, only to discover that there were no remnants of data on the C: drive! “How annoying,” I thought. Still, I wasn’t too concerned since I had backed up all the data prior to loading Win95. With complete confidence, I formatted C:, then went to my D: drive. Nothing.A slight tingle ran down my spine, and it wasn’t from the power source. I checked the E: drive. Nothing. Nothing! How could that be?! I had 15 years worth of work, dating back to the days of CPM, that were stored on that drive. Where did it go?! In a panic, I phoned Microsoft Tech Support. The phone calls continued daily for over two weeks, always with the same result. “We’ve never heard of this happening before. Sorry. There’s nothing I can suggest.”Long distance call after long distance call (none of them toll free, and all during prime rate periods) yielded the same result. Finally, one sympathetic soul gave me the name and number of a fellow who worked for Microsoft in Texas. With only the slimmest of hopes, I dialed his number. We chatted for almost 45 minutes while I explained the situation and answered his questions.”I bet I know what’s happened,” he said in an all-too-casual way.”Is that good?” I asked. “Can we recover anything?”Without replying directly, he instructed me to format a floppy (I was still able to work from the A: drive), and then told me to create a small .bat file, the contents of which he dictated. I did. I looked at C:, but nothing was there. I checked D:, and had the same result. Feeling completely defeated, I looked at E: I looked at E: again. I looked at E:, and screamed with joy into the telephone–it’s there!!Without realizing it, I had “compressed” the other two drives. It was a common technique for getting as much space as possible from a hard disk back in those days (when a 40-megabyte hard drive seemed limitless). What he correctly guessed was that when formatting C:, I had unknowingly deleted the file instructing the system how to read those drives as compressed when I reformatted my C: drive! By recreating the file, I was able to read the info from E:. Why it didn’t work on the other two drives, I still don’t know. The important thing was, I had all those irreplaceable files that I thought I’d never see again!I took his name, address, and his supervisor’s information to write a glowing, heartfelt thank-you note, praising his work. If he didn’t receiving a whopping salary bonus as a result, it’s not because he didn’t deserve it!Share your own PC horror story, and read more from other users, at our forum.Christopher Null is a veteran journalist who covers technology topics daily through his blog at Christopher Null, The Working Guy. Register Now » How to Survive the Worst PC Disasters Add to Queue Technologylast_img read more

Association between tobacco use and paranoia is largely due to shared genetic

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 25 2019Increasing evidence supports an association between tobacco use and psychotic experiences, such as paranoia and hallucinations, due in part to shared genetic influencesParanoia is associated with regular tobacco smoking in adolescents after accounting for other factors like cannabis use, sleep disturbances and stressful life events, reports a study recently published to the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). The study also provides novel insights about the underlying causes of the association.The authors found that the co-occurrence of paranoia with tobacco use was largely explained by genetic influences. Similar results for other types of psychotic experiences were also reported, including having hallucinations and disorganized thinking, which were also associated with tobacco use in teenagers.”While the links between drugs such as cannabis, paranoia and hallucinations have been reported before, much less is known about the relationship between tobacco use and mental health problems,” said senior author Angelica Ronald, Professor of Psychology and Genetics at Birkbeck, University of London, UK. “In particular, we do not really know why tobacco use and mental health problems often co-occur.”In these new findings from our lab, we show that using tobacco is to some degree heritable and that some of the same genetic influences on using tobacco also play a role in experiences such as feeling paranoid. It will be exciting to pursue this finding further to unpack the mechanisms that lead to this association.”The findings are based on the Twins Early Development Study, a large sample of twins born in England and Wales between 1994- 1996.More than 3,700 adolescents twin pairs took part in this study when they were aged 16. Of these, 31.4 percent reported smoking cigarettes within the past year, with 12.1 percent of the sample identifying as occasional smokers and 5.2 percent as regular smokers.Related StoriesGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”Living a healthy lifestyle may help offset genetic risk of dementiaMolecular switches may control lifespan and healthspan separately, genetic discovery suggestsAdolescents reported on their paranoia and other experiences such as having hallucinations and disorganized thinking, while their parents reported on issues such as a lack of motivation, social withdrawal, and their teenager seeming emotionally flat. These types of psychotic experiences and behaviors are common in adolescence and there is significant variability in how severe they are across individuals.The researchers found that the frequency of adolescent cigarette smoking was associated with having experiences such as paranoia, with regular smokers having more psychotic symptoms and experiences than non-smokers and occasional smokers. The associations remained even after accounting for several other possible factors such as gender, socio-economic status, cannabis use, prenatal maternal smoking, sleep disturbances and stressful life events.Environmental influences accounted for about two thirds of the differences in adolescent smoking behavior, and a third of the differences were due to genetic influences.The authors urge caution in interpreting the findings. They note that the reported association between tobacco use and psychotic experiences was modest and that their study does not show whether tobacco use causes or worsens psychotic symptoms and experiences, only that they are associated with one another. Nevertheless, the findings could be important because, if confirmed, tobacco use could be a modifiable risk factor for psychosis. Adolescence is an important stage of life when the brain is still developing and individuals can be vulnerable to mental health problems including psychosis. As such, understanding factors related to tobacco use is important and can contribute to changes in public policy.Source: https://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

Psychologists find link between working memory and sleep age depressed mood

first_img Source:https://www.ucr.edu/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 12 2019A team of psychologists has found strong associations between working memory — a fundamental building block of a functioning mind — and three health-related factors: sleep, age, and depressed mood. The team also reports that each of these factors is associated with different aspects of working memory.Working memory is the part of short-term memory that temporarily stores and manages information required for cognitive tasks such as learning, reasoning, and comprehension. Working memory is critically involved in many higher cognitive functions, including intelligence, creative problem-solving, language, and action-planning. It plays a major role in how we process, use, and remember information.The researchers, led by Weiwei Zhang, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, found that age is negatively related to the “qualitative” aspect of working memory–that is, how strong or how accurate the memory is. In other words, the older the person, the weaker and less precise the person’s memory. In contrast, poor sleep quality and depressed mood are linked to a reduced likelihood of remembering a previously experienced event — the “quantitative” aspect of working memory.”Other researchers have already linked each of these factors separately to overall working memory function, but our work looked at how these factors are associated with memory quality and quantity – the first time this has been done,” Zhang said. “All three factors are interrelated. For example, seniors are more likely to experience negative mood than younger adults. Poor sleep quality is also often associated with depressed mood. The piecemeal approach used in previous investigations on these relationships — examining the relationship between one of these health-related factors and working memory — could open up the possibility that an observed effect may be influenced by other factors.”Related StoriesNovel bed system with VR brainwave-control for sleep blissUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleepI’m a CPAP dropout: Why many lose sleep over apnea treatmentThe researchers are the first to statistically isolate the effects of the three factors on working memory quantity and quality. Although all three factors contribute to a common complaint about foggy memory, they seem to behave in different ways and may result from potentially independent mechanisms in the brain. These findings could lead to future interventions and treatments to counteract the negative impacts of these factors on working memory.Research results appear in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.The researchers performed two studies. In the first study, they sampled 110 college students for self-reported measures of sleep quality and depressed mood and their independent relationship to experimental measures of working memory. In the second study, the researchers sampled 31 members of a community ranging in age from 21 to 77 years. In this study, the researchers investigated age and its relationship to working memory.”We are more confident now about how each one of these factors impacts working memory,” Zhang said. “This could give us a better understanding of the underlying mechanism in age-related dementia. For the mind to work at its best, it is important that senior citizens ensure they have good sleep quality and be in a good mood.”Zhang was joined in the research by Weizhen Xie of UCR; Anne Berry of UC Berkeley; and Cindy Lustig and Patricia Deldin of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Next, the team plans to work on potential interventions for memory decline with age.last_img read more

Elite NKorean hacker group tied to bank attacks researchers

first_img Explore further An elite group of North Korean hackers has been identified as the source of a wave of cyberattacks on global banks that has netted “hundreds of millions” of dollars, security researchers said Wednesday. Cybersecurity firm: More Iran hacks as US sanctions loomed A report by the cybersecurity firm FireEye said the newly identified group dubbed APT38 is distinct from but linked to other North Korean hacking operations, and has the mission of raising funds for the isolated Pyongyang regime.FireEye researchers said APT38 is one of several hacking cells within an umbrella group known as “Lazarus,” but with unique skills and tools that have helped it carry out some of the world’s largest cyber heists.”They are a cybercriminal group with the skills of a cyberespionage campaign,” said Sandra Joyce, FireEye’s vice president of intelligence, in a briefing with journalists in Washington.Joyce said one of the characteristics of APT38 is that it takes several months, sometimes nearly two years, to penetrate and learn the workings of its targets before its attacks, which have sought to illegally transfer more than $1 billion from victimized banks.”They take their time to learn the intricacies of the organization,” Joyce said.Once they succeed, she added, “they deploy destructive malware on their way out” to hide their traces and make it more difficult for victims to find out what happened.Sense of urgencyJoyce said FireEye decided to go public about the threat out of a “sense of urgency” because the group appears to still be operating and is “undeterred by any diplomatic efforts.”The group has compromised more than 16 organizations in at least 11 different countries since at least 2014, according to the FireEye report. Some of the known attacks have targeted the Vietnam TP Bank in 2015, Bangladesh Bank in 2016, Far Eastern International Bank of Taiwan in 2017 and Bancomext of Mexico and Banco de Chile in 2018.Joyce said the group appears to have “the scope and resources of a nation-state” but offered no specific figures on how many people it uses. Security researchers say an elite group of North Korean hackers has stolen hundreds of millions of dollars from banks worldwide © 2018 AFP Focused missionSome of the information about APT38 was revealed in a US criminal complaint unsealed last month against Park Jin Hyok, charged in connection with WannaCry ransomware outbreak and the attack on Sony Pictures.But Park likely played only a peripheral role in APT38,which “has a focused mission to steal money to fund the North Korean regime,” according to Joyce.FireEye’s new report was based in part on forensic analysis it conducted for the FBI in the investigation into Park, but also from other data the security firm has gathered from its global client base.The researchers said APT38 used techniques including “phishing” emails to gain access to credentials and using “watering holes”—hijacked websites that appear normal but which contain malware that enable hackers to gather more data and access.As part of the scheme, the hackers created fake identities within known nongovernmental organizations or foundations to help move the stolen money, in some cases manipulating the global interbank transfer system known as SWIFT.The report is the latest highlighting a vast and increasingly sophisticated cyber campaign by North Korea for both political and financial ends.In September, a 176-page criminal complaint against Park outlined what officials called “a vast and audacious scheme by the North Korean government to utilize computer intrusions as a means to support the varied goals of their regime.”On Tuesday, the US Department of Homeland Security warned that North Korea is likely behind malware used to hack into and steal money from bank teller machines.The bulletin said officials believe the “Hidden Cobra” malware enabled North Korea to illegally get cash from bank machines in at least 30 countries, mainly in Asia and Africa, since 2016. Researchers said that North Korean national Park Jin Hyok, who was named in a US criminal complaint last month unveiled by Justice Department officials at a news conference pictured here, was peripherally involved in an elite bank hacking operation This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Elite N.Korean hacker group tied to bank attacks: researchers (2018, October 3) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-elite-nkorean-hacker-group-tied.html Nalani Fraser, a member of the FireEye research team, said APT38 attacks sought at least $1.1 billion since 2014 and have managed to steal “hundreds of millions of dollars based on data that we can confirm.”FireEye said there appears to be some sharing of resources between hacker groups in North Korea, including those involved in espionage and those in other kinds of attacks.last_img read more

Facebook hires British exdeputy PM as global affairs head

first_imgBritain’s former deputy prime minister Nick Clegg is set to move to California for his new role as Facebook’s head of global affairs Facebook accused of inaction over Russian ads in Brexit vote “I am delighted to be joining Facebook. After almost 20 years in European and British politics, this is an exciting new adventure for me,” Clegg wrote on his Facebook page.Clegg said Facebook was “at the heart of some of the most complex and difficult questions we face” such as “privacy of the individual”, “integrity of our democratic process”, and “the balance between free speech and prohibited content”.The Press Association news agency and the Financial Times said Clegg would be Facebook’s new head of global affairs and communications and would move to California in January.The 51-year-old is also a former European Commission trade negotiator and member of the European Parliament.Clegg used to be head of the Liberal Democrats, a small opposition party, but was voted out of parliament in a 2017 election when the party suffered major setbacks.The former politician has pushed for a second referendum that could stop Brexit but the proposal has been ruled out by Prime Minister Theresa May.His most recent book is entitled: “How to Stop Brexit (And Make Britain Great Again”.”As someone who has spent a lifetime arguing for Britain’s wholehearted commitment to Europe, it is of course a wrench to be leaving the public debate at a crucial time in the Brexit process,” Clegg wrote on Friday.”But the key decisions will soon pass to Parliament, of which I am no longer a Member, and once I had decided to take up this unique new challenge at Facebook, I felt it was best to get going sooner rather than later,” he added.Clegg speaks Dutch, French, German and Spanish, and joined the government after a 2010 election campaign characterised by “Cleggmania” over his superior performance in television debates.He was badly damaged, however, by going back on a promise not to raise university tuition fees once in government.The social network has faced several public relations crises in recent months and has instituted changes, particularly on privacy and the transparency of political campaign ads.In September, it admitted that up to 50 million accounts had been breached by hackers.It was also criticised for its handling of a data privacy scandal after it emerged that a British company called Cambridge Analytica had used data gathered through an app on Facebook to target voters in the US presidential election in 2016.The company, along with other social media giants, has also been accused of allowing “fake news” to spread that manipulated public opinion ahead of Donald Trump’s victory in that election. Citation: Facebook hires British ex-deputy PM as global affairs head (2018, October 19) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-facebook-hires-british-ex-deputy-pm.html © 2018 AFPcenter_img British former deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, a leading anti-Brexit advocate, said on Friday he would be starting a job at Facebook, as the US giant faces up to regulatory pressures. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more