Gas Transmission Project seeking public comment on Environmental Assessment Application

first_imgTransCanada says the Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) will prepare a report based on its internal review and input from the working group and the public, after which they’ll submit recommendations on the proposed project to the Government of British Columbia.TransCanada also says if approved, the proposed pipeline will “safely deliver natural gas from a point near Hudson Hope to a proposed LNG facility on Lelu Island with the District of Port Edward.”The pipeline is approximately 900 kilometres in length.- Advertisement -The Application is available for review at the TransCanada offices in Fort St. John or their website http://www.eao.gov.bc.ca/.The EAO is holding an open house June 23 2014 at the Hudson’s Hope community centre between 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.last_img read more

Liverpool may sell Adam to Stoke to fund Dempsey deal – report

first_imgLiverpool boss Brendan Rodgers could sell Charlie Adam to Stoke to fund the signing of Clint Dempsey, the Daily Mirror say.Dempsey is keen to move to Anfield but Fulham are yet to receive a bid for the American.It is claimed that Rodgers wants to sign him before the transfer deadline and is looking to offload a number of players in order to raise cash.Meanwhile, the Daily Mail say Fulham have made a last-ditch bid to sign Manchester United striker Dimitar Berbatov, who is close to agreeing a move to Fiorentina.The Guardian report that Fulham are interested in Blackpool winger Matt Phillips and Wolfsburg’s Iranian-German midfielder Ashkan Dejagah.Robert Green is getting ready to quit QPR, according to The Sun.The goalkeeper, who joined Rangers on a Bosman free transfer from West Ham this summer, has played only three matches for his new club.But it is claimed Green will look to leave Loftus Road in January if, as expected, Julio Cesar takes his first-team place.This page is regularly updated.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

USDA numbers neutral on July 11

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Doug Tenney, Leist MercantileWhat will USDA give us today? How will they affect my bottom line?That is the gargantuan (adjective for the day) question farmers are asking. They continue to be in shock with the most surprising corn acres number provided with the June 28 Acres Report. This report had U.S. corn acres at 91.7 million acres while soybean acres were estimated at 80 million acres. What happened to prevent planted corn acres talked about for weeks ahead of that report? Corn acres were a huge bearish surprise, with December CBOT corn closing down 19 ½ cents at $4.31 ½ on the June 28 report day. Trader estimates ahead of the report estimated corn acres at 86-87 million acres. Soybean acres were a huge bullish surprise as the November CBOT soybeans closed at $9.23, up 10 ¾ cents that same day. Trader estimates had been 84 million acres.Corn acres unchanged, yield unchanged, ending stocks up but below trade estimates. Soybean acres unchanged, yield lower one bushel, ending stocks lower and below trade estimates. Shortly after report release corn down 2 cents, soybeans up 1 cent, wheat up 4 cents.Today numbers will not be a one hit wonder. All will be looking at acres. In addition, analysts will be considering U.S. exports, U.S. ending stocks, stocks to use ratios, and finally global production and ending stocks. Trading ranges could be brisk and most volatile.Prior to the report corn was down two cents, while soybeans and wheat were down one cent. Many had expected the corn numbers to be bearish with lower exports and higher ending stocks.Weather concerns are not going away with warm and dry seen into the weekend across the Midwest. A tropical storm has already brought nine inches of rain to parts of Louisiana this week. Its remnants may or may not reach into Kansas and Missouri where some of the driest conditions exist.It has been a hard spring for producers in Ohio and across the Midwest. Planting has not been fun at all with the many rain delays and late plantings for corn and soybeans. Producers wanted to forget the wet fall from last year. Unfortunately, it has carried into this year with even more stress and uncertainty. This week Ohio’s farmers are still planting the first crop soybeans in numerous locations. It is easy to see that corn and soybean development is 20-30 days behind normal. Throw in the words, “early frost” to bring on even more uncertainty for final corn and soybean yields.Today and the weeks which follow continue to be the battle of the decade. Demand bears point to U.S. export demand shrinking for corn, soybeans, and wheat. They have plenty of ammunition with huge corn supplies with South America, Brazil exporting more and more soybeans to China while the U.S. exports have fallen off the map, along with big wheat production from Russia which has benefitted from timely rains. Supply bulls continue to point to a record wet spring, the wettest in 125 years. Crop development for corn and soybeans is behind normal.In the eastern U.S. Corn Belt, Ohio’s old crop corn basis levels are at decades’ high numbers. Numerous Ohio locations are September plus 30 to 60 cents. Basis levels have increased weekly by nickels and even multiple dimes from mid-May forward in numerous Ohio locations, especially in western Ohio. Old corn has not moved as expected with producers holding onto corn for more money, especially if they have not been able to plant normal acres of corn. This delayed movement of old corn has contributed greatly to the basis levels currently seen. No producer wants to be left standing when the music stops. When the party is over, those dimes could be multiple dimes lower in just days.The meteorological term “ring of fire,” with the extreme heat seen in the Midwest this week has easily replaced “trains of rain,” which took place in May.Look for weather and yields to once again return to the forefront in price direction. This change could easily be within minutes of the noon Eastern Time report release.last_img read more

Emotional Morrison wins gold in taekwondo, avenges teammate’s loss

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES ‘Disappointed’ Amit says Centeno deserves the gold LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Samuel Thomas Harper Morrison of the Philippines battles Ardian Prayogo Dinggo of Indonesia in the finals of the men’s -74kg of the 29th Southeast Asian Games taekwondo competition. Morrisson prevailed to win the gold medal. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/SEA GAMES MEDIA POOLKUALA LUMPUR — The Philippine taekwondo team scored a gold through an emotional Samuel Morrison but lost one after a questionable decision on Arven Alcantara Sunday in the 29th Southeast Asian Games at KLCC Hall 1 here.Morrison, motivated by his promise to his deceased grandmother, didn’t hide his tears after blasting Dinggo Ardian Prayogo, 28-18, in the men’s 74-kilogram or lightweight division.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Read Nextcenter_img SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses “Sorry,” said Morrison as he broke down before Filipino media at mixed zone. “I got very affected. I was thinking about her all day today.”Morrison said he went to the grave of his maternal grandmother, Rosario Barrios, before flying here promising to win the gold for her.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIt had almost the same level of emotions as far as Alcantara is concerned after he was disqualified in the final against hometown bet Rozaimi Bin Rozali in the men’s -68kg or featherweight.The Philippine team were up in arms after the referee raised the Malaysian’s hand via “referee punitive declaration.” Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics PLAY LIST 00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games The score was tied at 17 and with only seconds left in the third and final round when the referee arbitrarily decided the fight, which drew uproar from the big crowd.But coach Japoy Lizardo said there were only eight ganyeums (violations) called. Ten would be automatic disqualification.“That’s why he went for turning long kick and then fall,” said Lizardo. A fall is meted with one ganyeum.Pauline Lopez, former champion in her division women’s -62kg, fell to Vietnamese Ha Thu Nguyen, 4-3, in the semis and settled for bronze.The Philippines, thus, garnered one gold, one silver and one bronze on the first day of taekwondo competitions. Three more jins will action on Monday including Olympian Kirstie Elaine Alora.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding View commentslast_img read more

SAAM to Invest USD 1335 Mn in 2017

first_imgzoom Chilean port, towage and logistics services provider SAAM has announced plans to invest a total of USD 133.5 million this year.The company intends to invest USD 85 million in maintenance and extension of its current assets – San Antonio Terminal Internacional, Terminal Portuario Guayaquil and San Vicente Terminal Internacional.SAAM materialized the acquisition of two concessions in Puerto Caldera, the second largest port in Costa Rica, for USD 48.5 million. The company now controls 51% of Sociedad Portuaria de Caldera (SPC) and of Sociedad Portuaria Granelera de Caldera (SPGC), whose transferred annual volume totals 5.5 million tons.In the past four years, the company has invested a total of USD 500 million in equipment and infrastructure.In 2016, SAAM’s earnings amounted to USD 54.5 million, representing a 5.6% growth.“Thanks to our portfolio diversification and adequate commercial strategy, we recorded a good performance during difficult times for the industry. We offset the drop in markets like Brazil, Mexico, and particularly Chile, and strengthened others such as Peru and Central America. We keep a significant cash flow and dividends for our shareholders,” Felipe Joannon, the company’s Chairman of the Board, said.Last year, SAAM inaugurated the new dock in San Vicente Terminal Internacional, Chile, which increased its capacity by 40%. Additionally, the company inaugurated a system for the reception, warehousing and shipping of mineral concentrates in Terminal Internacional del Sur, Peru. SAAM also completed the tugboat fleet renovation process.Furthermore, Joannon drew attention on “a cautious assessment” of the need for a mega port in the central zone.“The current port infrastructure, with the construction of new terminals in San Antonio and Valparaíso and the ongoing extensions, ensure enough capacity to support foreign trade efficiently in the next 10 to 15 years. We believe that the current priority is to significantly improve the terminals’ connectivity and complementary infrastructure”, he added.last_img read more

Twitter removes accounts linked to Alex Jones Infowars

first_imgTwitter has removed some accounts thought to be used to circumvent a ban on conspiracy-monger Alex Jones and Infowars, the company said Tuesday.A Twitter spokesman confirmed that the accounts had been removed but provided no additional comment. The company says it usually does not discuss specific accounts.Twitter permanently suspended @realalexjones and @infowars from Twitter and Periscope in early September, later than many other tech companies such as Apple and Facebook. It said it based that action in reports of tweets and videos that violated its policy against abusive behaviour.The ban underscored the difficulty many social-media services face in trying to consistently apply their rules against harassment and other bad behaviour. It was also likely from the start that Jones and his supporters would find ways to get around Twitter’s ban by setting up new accounts or posting from existing accounts that were not part of the initial purge.Twitter said Tuesday it would continue to evaluate reports regarding other accounts potentially associated with @realalexjones or @infowars and would take action if it finds content that violates its rules or if other accounts are used to try to circumvent their ban.As of Tuesday afternoon, an account for Alex Jones podcasts was still up on Twitter, as was another called “InfowarsFeed” that hasn’t tweeted since 2008.Other tech companies, including PayPal, YouTube, Apple and Spotify, have limited or banned Jones’ activities on their sites.Infowars has said the moves are intended to sabotage the site just weeks before the midterm elections.On Twitter and elsewhere, Jones has done such things as describe survivors of a shooting in Parkland, Florida, “crisis actors” and saying the mass killing at Sandy Hook Elementary in 2012 was fake. He had about 900,000 followers on Twitter. Infowars had about 430,000.last_img read more

Decrease in amputations from frostbite thanks to Fort St John Doctor

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Residents of the region will soon receive a new way of treatment for frostbite thanks to a Dr. Jamie Wilkie.During Dr. Wilkie’s residency in Fort. St. John, he addressed a need for a better plan in dealing with frostbite in patients and recognized the use of a drug called iloprost can help by decreasing the number of amputations due to severe frostbite.“The literature for the use of iloprost in severe frostbite shows a significant decrease in the need for amputations,” says Dr. Wilkie. “The goal of this project is to improve access to the best evidence-based treatments for severe frostbite in Northern BC.” Dr. Wilkie, a recent graduate of the UBC Family Medicine residency program, chose the subject matter for his resident scholar project on the treatment of frostbite. By collaborating with Jessica Brecknock, Regional Medication Use Management Pharmacist, and Kendra Clary, Med Systems Pharmacy Technician, created a prepackaged treatment plan (order set) for use of the drug iloprost in severe frostbite cases.According to Northern Health, they approved this protocol, and it will be available for use this winter. Dr. Wilkie believes this is the first frostbite order set for iloprost in BC.Dr. Wilkie moved to Fort St. John in June 2017 and is said to be enjoying the North and all the outdoor opportunities that are available.“I previously lived and worked in Hay River [in the Northwest Territories], have dogsledded in the Yukon, and guided canoe trips in all three territories,” says Dr. Wilkie. “I have personally and professionally seen the impacts of frostbite and related exposure injuries.”last_img read more

IAF shows radar images of Pak F16 encounter

first_imgNEW DELHI: Radar images of an air battle between Indian Air Force (IAF) pilot Abhinandan Varthaman and a Pakistani jet during a February dogfight were shown by the air force Monday as “irrefutable proof” that a Pakistani F-16 fighter jet had been shot down by India. Last week, American news publication Foreign Policy had contradicted India quoting unnamed US defence officials as saying that Islamabad’s F-16s were counted and “none were missing.””The IAF has irrefutable evidence of not only use the fact that PAF used F-16 on 27 February but also that an IAF MiG21 Bison shot down a PAF F-16,” said Air Vice Marshal RGK Kapoor, the Assistant Chief of Air Staff (Operations and Space). Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsThe government had said that in an aerial duel on February 27 – a day after India sent fighter jets to Pakistan’s Balakot to strike a terror training camp – pilot Abhinandan Varthaman had engaged with one of the Pakistani fighter jets that tried to target Indian military facilities, and shot it down before he was hit and forced to eject. Abhinandan Varthaman landed across the Line of Control and was in Pakistani custody for three days before he was returned to India amid attempts to de-escalate the crisis between the two sides. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayThe Air Force Monday said Pakistani aircraft fired multiple AMRAAM missiles which were defeated. “In the aerial combat that followed one MiG 21 Bison of the IAF piloted by Wing Commander Abhinandan shot down one F-16 of PAF. As shown in radar image on the slide. The F-16 crashed and fell across the LOC. The IAF lost one MiG21 in the aerial engagement, and Abhinandan ejected safely but his parachute drifted across the Line of Control, and he was taken into custody by Pakistan Army,” said the Air Vice Marshal. The Air Force said two parachutes were visually sighted, which were corroborated by radio communication intercepts. Even Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan had on camera indicated “more than one pilot”. These conclusively proved that two aircraft had gone down that day in the same area, separated by around 1 to 1.30 minutes. with pti inputslast_img read more

How Two GradeSchoolers Set Off A Tennis Revolution

Evonne Goolagong (left) and Peaches Bartkowicz at Wimbledon in 1970. Daily Express/Getty Images By Carl Bialik When Peaches Bartkowicz and Chris Evert put their left hands above their right hands to grip their tennis racquets, they were girls in grade school unknowingly defying tennis orthodoxy to hit backhands the way that felt most comfortable. Today, more than half a century later, a little girl who hit backhands without using both hands would be the one defying tennis orthodoxy. One-handed backhands have almost completely disappeared from women’s tennis. And that’s thanks in part to the success that Bartkowicz and Evert had with their two-handed backhands. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed The two-handed backhand’s dominance has continued: Its users have won 35 of the last 36 women’s major titles. Every woman in the top 10 and 48 of the top 50 use it. It’s also become the dominant backhand in men’s tennis, though with accomplished one-handed holdouts such as Roger Federer, Stan Wawrinka and Dominic Thiem. (Tennis-nerd note: Every player occasionally hits backhands with one hand, especially in defensive positions, either to slice the ball or when forced to take a hand off the racquet to reach the ball. What we’re talking about are how players hit the backhand when they have time to get to the ball and drive it offensively.)Bartkowicz and Evert hit their backhands with two hands because they felt just one didn’t give them enough strength. The two-hander took over pro tennis for similar reasons. Using their off hand on backhands lets players hit with additional power, which gives the ball more speed and spin, especially in concert with the latest racquet and string technology. The one-hander’s advantages — better feel for the ball, more equipped for wide reaches and low bounces, smoother transition to one-handed backhand volleys at net — count less in a game played rarely on low-bouncing, volley-friendly grass and usually contested behind the baseline.The two-handed backhand is especially valuable when returning serves, as the extra support helps to absorb and redirect powerful, high-bouncing shots. Tennis analyst Jeff Sackmann has shown that in men’s pro tennis, players with two-handed backhands get the return in play more often, and win the point more often when they do. Data collected through Sackmann’s crowdsourced Match Charting Project for the women’s game shows the same general trends: Players with two-handed backhands have more success returning serves than do players with one-handed backhands. It’s hard to reach firm conclusions because there are simply so few women hitting one-handed backhands.The dearth of top women using one-handed backhands may be the most compelling data point demonstrating the two-handed backhand’s dominance: If it weren’t the best option, more women would be hitting backhands with one hand. Tennis, like all sports, has its share of domineering coaches, but it is also primarily an individual and individualistic sport. Players command their own games and choose the shots and tactics that will win the most. That makes tennis a sport that breeds innovation, whether it’s among pros at a Slam or among two young girls who chose the backhand that best suited them. And if the one-handed backhand ever makes a comeback in women’s tennis, it might begin with a girl defying orthodoxy and taking one hand off the racquet.Emma Morgenstern contributed research.This is part of our new podcast series “Ahead Of Their Time,” profiling players and managers in various sports who were underappreciated in their era. In the latest installment in our documentary podcast series Ahead Of Their Time, we look at Bartkowicz and Evert, the innovators who brought the two-handed backhand to women’s tennis in a major way. Evert’s story is well-known: She rode her backhand, accuracy and focus to 18 Grand Slam singles titles. Bartkowicz’s is more obscure: After an extraordinary juniors career, she never reached a Grand Slam semifinal as a pro and played her last Slam soon after turning 22. But Bartkowicz’s backhand was ahead of her time. When she was just 12, a photo of her swinging with two hands at the Southern Girls Tennis Tournament appeared in the Louisville Courier-Journal. The caption began with the all-caps “TWO HANDS!” and called the shot a “baseball backhand.” When she won the 1965 U.S. Open girls title, The New York Times commended her “tremendous marksmanship” with that shot. By the time she closed out her junior career without a loss at the 1967 U.S. Open, the Philadelphia Inquirer called her “the foremost exponent of the two-handed backhand in women’s competition.”Evert is nearly six years younger than Bartkowicz and was unknown when Bartkowicz’s baseball backhand became famous. But Evert soon surpassed her older rival. She played her first Grand Slam at the 1971 U.S. Open — just two months after Bartkowicz played her last major at Wimbledon — and made the semifinals at age 16. In 1974, Evert won her first two Grand Slam titles, and the first two on record by a woman who hits a two-handed backhand. (A few notable men used two-handed backhands in the 1930s and 1940s, but the shot had mostly fallen back out of favor among men, too, when Bartkowicz and Evert were starting out.) By the time Evert won her last major, in 1986, her signature shot was tightening its grip in the sport, thanks also to its use by men’s champions Jimmy Connors and Bjorn Borg. And two years after Evert’s retirement, Monica Seles won three of four majors while using two hands on both backhands and forehands.By 2014, when The Economist tracked the decline of one-handed backhands in the pro game, just one woman with a one-handed backhand had won a major since 2008: Francesca Schiavone, at the 2010 French Open. Embed Code read more