NBA free agency: How will the Warriors fare with a young roster?

first_imgSACRAMENTO – The day has mostly consisted of studying new scouting reports, new playbooks and new rules. Then, the Warriors young draft picks either pick up their phones, turn on their televisions or scour the web. Then, they learn they have a new teammate.“I have to follow it, knowing who’s going to be part of the team,” Warriors rookie Eric Paschall said in amusement. “You have to follow who’s on the team now. I think it’s a good group.”It might be a good group. But it is a dramatically …last_img read more

Amazing Grace in fourth European win

first_img8 October 2012South Africa’s Branden Grace captured his fourth European Tour title of 2012 on Sunday with a two-shot victory in the Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, played at Saint Andrews, Carnoustie and Kingsbarns.“I’ve really dreamt of this moment my whole life,” he said after securing victory.“I had goosebumps thinking this morning about Louis [winning The Open Championship at Saint Andrews in 2010] and the possibility of holding a trophy here myself.“It was a tough day, but the putter started working and that’s all I needed to do.”Select companyThe win puts the 24-year-old South African in select company, namely Seve Ballesteros, Ernie Els, Nick Faldo, Miguel Angel Jiminez, Martin Kaymer, Bernhard Langer, Lee Westwood, Tiger Woods and Ian Woosnam, who also managed to win four events in a single year on the European Tour.With his win on Sunday, though, Grace achieved something never before done: he became the first graduate of the European Tour Qualifying School to win four times in the year after his graduation.He also became the first South African to win the Alfred Dunhill Links Championship and maintained an enviable record of always winning when leading or sharing the lead heading into the final round of a tournament.Four-shot leadHaving opened with a remarkable 60 on the Kingsbarns course, Grace followed that up with rounds of 67 and 69 to lead by four shots with a round to go on 20-under-par 196.In the final round, however, Denmark’s Thorbjørn Olesen managed to draw level with Grace with seven holes to go. The South African, though, responded superbly, sinking birdie putts of 10, 12 and 14 feet on the next three holes to pull clear.He went on to card a 70 and finish on a tournament record 22-under-par 266, two shots clear of Olesen. Sweden’s Alexander Noren claimed third on 18-under-par 270, with Joel Sjoholm in fourth on 16-under-par 272.Course recordSouth Africa’s George Coetzee was on fire in the final round, equalling the Saint Andrews course record with a superb 10-under-par 62, which moved him up to a share of fifth place with Fredrik Andersson Hed, Victor Dubuisson, Stephen Gallacher, Raphael Jacquelin, Lee Slattery and Danny Willett on 15-under-par 273.The winner’s cheque of €617 284 (approximately R7.05-million) was the largest of Grace’s career. It also helped to lift him up to third place in the Race to Dubai rankings, trailing only world number one Rory McIlroy and Justin Rose.Just behind Grace is 2012 Open champion Ernie Els, Italy’s Francesco Molinari and Louis Oosthuizen. Like Oosthuizen and 2011 Masters’ champion Charl Schwartzel, Grace is a product of the Ernie Els Foundation, and Els himself believes Grace will become the third former member of the Foundation to win a Major title.Meteoric riseHis rise in 2012 has certainly been meteoric. He began the year ranked 265th in the year and is now ranked 37th in the official world golf rankings.Grace’s other European Tour victories this year include the Joburg Open and the Volvo Golf Champions in January and the Volvo China Open in April.More recently, in September, he returned to South Africa to play in two winter events on the Sunshine Tour and won the Vodacom Origins of Golf Final for his second title of the year on The Links at Fancourt.Besides his third place in the Race to Dubai standings, he’s also a clear leader atop the Sunshine Tour standings, almost R800 000 clear of second placed Louis Oosthuizen.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

South African economy well positioned to recover from current slowdown

first_imgJohannesburg, Tuesday 6 October 2015 – Brand South Africa notes the statement by the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry that the country’s Business Confidence Index has fallen to its lowest level since 1993.It cannot be disputed that the South African economy is experiencing challenges with the World Bank and the South African Reserve Bank having revised growth targets downwards in the recent weeks.However South Africa has a range of strengths which can be leveraged to turn the economic situation around. To name a few:• The World Economic Forum in its 2015 Global Competitiveness Index last week said that “South Africa hosts the continent’s most efficient financial market (12/140) and benefits from a sound goods market (38/140), which is driven by strong domestic competition (28/140).”• The Ibrahim Index on African Governance in its 2015 assessment of 54 countries in Africa, released yesterday, found that South Africa ranks number 2 in the continent in terms of business environment and number 1 in terms of public management.• The Department of Trade and Industry earlier this week announced that FDI inflows into South Africa amounted to US$3.31 billion from January 2015 to July 2015. This indicates confidence in South Africa’s investment climate by foreign investors.• South Africa is also currently implementing a 9-Point Plan comprising simultaneous actions in key strategic areas, aimed at revitalising the economy.These statistics show that despite challenges in the South African economy which are contributing negatively to business confidence, the South African economy remains strong and well positioned to recover in terms of business confidence.Minister Radebe speaking at the Black Management Forum earlier today said, “Faced with a stagnating economy, it is imperative that we find effective and sustainable ways to accelerate the growth rate [and] we need develop the country’s industrial capabilities and reduce dependence on commodity exports.”The commitment by government and collaboration by the corporate sector will see South Africa being to leverage the strengths highlighted above to reverse the current economic situation in the country.Notes to the EditorThe statement by the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry can be found on their website.last_img read more

Ohio Pork Congress highlights

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Pork Congress had the largest attendance in several years since it moved to its Columbus location.“We’ve been blessed to have good participation over the past several years and this is a record for the last 10 or 12 years,” said Rich Deaton, Ohio Pork Council president. “We had over 500 pre-registered and that is due to the event planning committee. It just goes to show that if we get the right program and right presenters here, people will come and benefit from what they have to share.”The event followed the Tri-State Sow Housing Conference held the previous day and the topic was a natural topic of conversation as the 2025 deadline for implementation of the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board sow housing requirements draws closer.“One of the things that is on our minds here in Ohio is the magic number of 2025 when the sow housing changes have to be implemented. We have many exhibitors here that will help producers be able to retrofit their barns and make the transition to meet the Ohio Livestock Care Standard Requirements here in 2025. It is a big deal,” Deaton said. “We had good participation at the Sow Housing Conference. We heard from people who have already made the transition either with a new building or retrofitting an existing building. They shared some things that they learned and hearing about that hands-on experience really helps.”Another topic of discussion was the strong demand for pork.“One of the things I have been impressed with over the last year is that domestic consumption is up. It is getting close to 52 pounds consumed per person, that is getting close to a high for us,” Deaton said. “Bacon has always been popular, but it is more popular now than it has been. Bacon has been really hot but loins have dropped off. Loins used to be our leader but now ribs and bacon are the leaders. As we got that pig leaner, we also leaned up the bacon and made it a better, more appealing product than 20 years ago. We have to get used to the shifting consumer demands. My goal is to work to get the loins back up to where they were and keep the bacon where it is.”Ohio Pork Congress attendees also got a legislative update, a PRRS Mapping update, a report on global trends in protein consumption, a water quality update, and an overview of manure application research.For the past five years, Glen Arnold with Ohio State University Extension has conducted research on methods of sidedressing liquid manure. Initially, he used a tanker filled with liquid manure that was applied to young corn fields in several western Ohio counties. But the dragline and manure sidedress toolbar, compared to a tanker, weigh less and are faster and more efficient, Arnold pointed out. Also, the dragline and toolbar cause very few plants to be crushed to death. OSU research has found manure sidedressed fields produced 13 more bushels of corn per acre compared to fields where synthetic fertilizers were applied saving about $80 an acre, Arnold said.“There’s always a cost to the livestock farmer to apply manure to farm fields. By capturing more of the nitrogen in the manure, the farmer can reduce the need to purchase commercial fertilizer and make a bigger profit,” Arnold said.Attendees also heard a National Pork Board Update from Bill Even, CEO, National Pork Board, Des Moines, Iowa and an entertaining presentation from keynote speaker Rob Sharkey, a farmer and podcaster from Bradford, Illinois. Award winners, including the Industry Excellence Award winners the Surber family, were recognized as well. The Surber family was recognized with the Industry Excellence Award. Jess Campbell accepted the Friend of the Ohio Pork Industry award for Farm Credit Mid-America. Glen Arnold (right) was recognized with the Pork Industry Service Award for his work with manure in 2018. Frank Pizzo accepted an award for City Barbecue for Pork Promoter of the Year presented by Ty Higgins. Frank Pizzo accepted an award for City Barbecue for Pork Promoter of the Year Ben Pitstick, left, was recognized as the Swine Manager of the Year presented by OPC president Rich Deaton. Bill Even with NPPC provided a legislative update, Keynote Speaker Rob Sharkey, Bradford, Illinois covered “Talking About Tough Topics in a Meaningful Way”last_img read more

Air Leaks or Thermal Loss: What’s Worse?

first_imgBeefing up R-values and reducing air leaks are the twin rallying cries of builders focusing on energy efficiency. Regardless of the particulars of the house design, more insulation and fewer air leaks make houses more comfortable, more durable, and less expensive to heat and cool.No one seems to argue that point. But Al Cobb wonders which is more significant.“My real goal is to find the tipping point when a leaky building loses more energy via air changes then via the insulated envelope,” he writes in GBA’s Q&A forum. “I’ve had many answers where the losses from air leakage have been as low as 10% or as high as 50%.”Cobb believes home buyers have been “brainwashed” into thinking only about R-values, as energy codes give short shrift to the importance of airtightness. Energy modeling is especially frustrating, he says, because it asks for highly specific information on R-values but only broad generalizations when it comes to airtightness.“Therefore, I’m looking for a study or analysis of homes (real or not) that have been modeled to the extent that heat loss from conductive and air infiltration losses are clearly defined,” Cobb adds. “It only makes sense that as leakage rates increase, the decision to ignore air-sealing can be shown as a critical mistake.” RELATED ARTICLES Other solutions suggestedWhile Riversong suggests there is more of value in the model energy code on air sealing than Cobb or AJ acknowledge, J Chesnut has another idea, providing you’re a math nut. You could, he says, play with heat loss formulas developed by ASHRAE. J Chestnut points to some specifics in a 2005 publication which offer a way of calculating infiltration rates for load calculations.Hunter Dendy adds this idea to the mix: “Maybe the simplest approach would be to model a house and then adjust those variables to see how it changes the performance/heating load of the model,” Dendy writes. “You probably won’t find an across-the-board answer to your question since there are too many variables involved in house design and site conditions. Better to look at it on a project-by-project basis, but after doing this for a while you will get a feel for it.”And in the end, that’s where the discussion seems to put us. Thermal insulation and air sealing are both essential for high-performance houses, but there may be no cut-and-dried answer to Cobb’s original question that fits all circumstances. Some truth to the argumentAs to Cobb’s basic premise that too much attention is focused on R-values, AJ Builder is right on board.“R-value — My biggest pet peeve, especially when discussed here on this supposedly leading source of green building advice site!” he says. “You all love to quote rules and ‘the codes,’ yet two homes can be built with the same approved R-value insulation and have 100% different energy needs. The codes should spec insulation in more regard as to how continuous it is, in how it actually performs at all temperatures, when it is needed most and other aspects of the entire assembly. We all know that fiberglass batts in an attic that is at 0°F is not giving the same true R-value as, say, the R-value of other installs — but where [does] the beloved code address this fact?“The code and discussions here would make much more sense if R-value [measured the R-value of the] actual whole assembly, rated at worst design temperature of stated climate,” AJ suggests. “Otherwise the info is garbage.”That’s exactly what I’m talking about, Cobb says. “The average consumer, building official, and architect is consumed with the perception of the importance of R-value,” says Cobb. “That misperception is the basis of my question that started this thread. If modeling identifies the cost of ignoring good air-sealing, it can be used as a tool that educates all people about building better buildings by using products and systems that perform properly. The suggestion that the code has comprehensive standards is laughable.”Moreover, Cobb bristles at Riversong’s tone: “I’m looking for data to help us build better homes and help the consumer make better choices,” Cobb says. “What I’m not looking for is criticism of my professional capabilities.” Understanding R-ValueHow Tight is Too Tight?Exceeding the Energy CodeVideo Series: Attic Air SealingPodcast: Air Barrier or Vapor Barrier?GBA Encyclopedia: Air BarriersGBA Encyclopedia: Addressing Air LeaksProduct Guide: Air Barrier Components Building Plans for the Thermal Bypass ChecklistNavigating Energy Star’s Thermal Bypass ChecklistOne Air Barrier or Two?Airtight Wall and Roof SheathingBlower Door BasicsPinpointing Leaks With a Fog Machine Q&A: HERS ratingscenter_img Expert’s opinionHere’s how GBA Technical Director Peter Yost sees it:Mathematically, you can constrain the two equations for convective and conductive heat loss and force them to be equal. And then in some part the relationship will be driven by the geometry of the building and the relationship between surface area and volume. But problems quickly arise:1. Conduction is a field phenomenon and convection is a point effect. In the equations we just sum each effect and yet we know it is the sizes and locations of all the holes that are really important.2. If we set the equations equal to each other, we are assuming that one does not affect the other. And yet we know that where and how the air leakage occurs can erode R-values.3. Many building materials ‘care’ a lot more about convective than they do conductive heat loss because moisture moves with the air and can condense. So, we typically worry a lot more about convective than conductive heat loss in terms of durability.And then there are the occupants. Their concern about the relationship between the two phenomena is complicated as much by the quality as it is the quantity of air exchange. While ASHRAE 62.2 gives us some guidance on how much fresh air — or more exactly, outside air — we should have in terms of occupant health and safety, how much outside air occupants need is a far from settled question and dependent on many more factors than the ones that architects and builders control.There is no question that most folks, lay people and too many in our industry, are “R-centric” and give convective heat transfer short shrift. But a ton of great work has gone in to EPA’s Thermal Bypass Checklist to guide our priorities in cost effectively and practically tackling the big and typical holes. And both in terms of overall energy efficiency and building durability, the continuity of the air or convective barrier is just as important as and even codependent with the continuity of the thermal or conductive barrier. Ain’t no such animalGood luck and God speed, suggests Robert Riversong: “Your question is similar to, ‘What’s the difference between an apple?’,” he writes. “The answer could range from near zero to near 100%, and is entirely dependent on whole-house R-value and whole-house air exchange rate during normal operation (not under blower door testing). If you’re asking about ‘average’ existing housing, there is some data on that. If you’re asking about a particular new construction project, you have to do the heat loss analysis for that specific building including design or actual air exchange losses.”And as Riversong suggests, it might be useful to pin down exactly what we mean when we refer to “the code,” as if there was a single, universal book of rules accepted by building inspectors everywhere.“There is no ‘The Code,’ ” he says. “There are international model codes which are becoming more comprehensive by the year and which each jurisdiction can choose to adopt or modify. And all building codes are minimum standards. You’re free to exceed them as much as you’d like.”That said, there is always the HERS rating system, an approach to quantifying energy efficiency established by the Residential Energy Services Network. Its 0 to 100 scale compares the performance of a tested home to that of a house built to standards of the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code.HERS inspections include both a blower-door test to measure airtightness and a test to measure duct leakage.last_img read more

A Low-Energy House for Northern Minnesota

first_img BLOGS BY ELDEN LINDAMOOD Foundation and Nailbase Details for a Minnesota HouseInstalling Windows in a Minnesota House Relative Humidity and Makeup Air at a Tight Minnesota HouseA Follow-up From Northern Minnesota Nailbase panels on the exterior side of the 2×6 wallsThe main item that was the subject of the most consideration on this house was the wall assembly (see Image #4, below). Since wall assemblies are often the hottest debate topic here, let’s start with that.For the above-grade walls, I knew I wanted at least an R-45 assembly to meet my energy goals. I also initially wanted stone exterior cladding. As a result, the original plan utilized Quad-Loc ICF wall construction which I arrived at for a number of reasons. I wasn’t comfortable putting a masonry cladding over a high-R wood-framed wall, and I liked the security of a relatively storm-proof and rot proof ICF wall system.The pricing for the stone work came in astronomically high, as did the “Plan B” brick option. This reality, combined with the facts that nobody in my area was familiar with Quad-Loc forms, and the nearest supplier was 200 miles away, started to chip away at the ICF wall strategy.Ultimately, the cost of the concrete for the walls plus the nagging global-warming-potential guilt put the final nail in the ICF coffin. I begrudgingly decided to opt for a wood-framed wall with wood siding over a furred rainscreen.Our design firm has done many double-stud walls with dense-packed cellulose. My builder of choice was also familiar with double-stud wall construction and had proved to be meticulous at detailing an interior vapor retarder/air barrier, achieving impressive blower door results well below my target.However I have been increasingly concerned about the potential for moisture problems with double-stud walls, and more and more interested in continuous exterior foam strategies. I had numerous conversations with other nerdy types about the merits of using the structural sheathing as the air barrier in the assembly and concluded that it was the best strategy. Just like everybody else hoping to grace the world with the “perfect wall” solution, I was off to the drawing board (again).Our office has done a few projects with single-stud walls wrapped in multiple layers of rigid polyisocyanurate foam, and we got quite a bit of feedback from our builders that the assemblies were time-consuming and a bit fussy. Lots of cutting and fitting, long cap-nails required to hold the water-resistive barrier (WRB) in place, and the need for fairly substantial furring to meet the nail holding requirements of most sidings. Regardless, I likely would have pursued this route with my own house, rationalizing that the form was simple and thus it wouldn’t cost much — but then I stumbled onto nailbase panels.Nailbase panels are a product offered by many SIP manufacturers, and they are available in numerous specified thicknesses of EPS foam with a layer of 7/16” OSB bonded to one side only. Usually marketed as a retrofit product, we got to thinking about their potential for new construction.Since we are essentially eliminating the structural component from the SIP, we amuse ourselves in the office by calling them IPs. I never personally cared much for SIP construction because the reliance on glue to hold the whole works together leaves me feeling uneasy. Also, the effort to run electrical and other services in the exterior walls seemed overly complicated. In contrast, the IPs come in 4’ x 8’ sheets, with notches on every panel edge for an OSB spline to connect adjoining panels. There is no internal or panel edge framing. You simply cut them to size, apply sealant to the edges and screw them to the framed structural wall.The following are some things I like about the IP wall:The ability to cut the IPs to size on site allows for easy changes and adjustments that SIPs don’t.Attaching them to the outside of a framed structural wall makes framing the house walls easy, lets me utilize my exterior structural sheathing as the assembly’s air barrier.Keeps the structural sheathing on the warm side of the wall (unlike double-stud walls).Leaves the interior wall cavity open for whatever you want to stuff into it.With the structural sheathing as the air barrier on the exterior side of the wall cavity I also don’t need to mess with airtight boxes or excessive sealants at mechanical and electrical penetrations at the interior.The premium grade OSB that SIP manufacturers use makes furring and/or siding attachment simple.A few of my reservations about the IPs are:Uses a lot of foamThey make a mess when cutting with power tools.With the 8-inch nailbase panel you get an R-29. That alone would meet code in our climate even if I chose to leave the framed wall cavity empty. I chose to fill the cavities with dense-packed cellulose because I wanted the additional R-value and the cellulose installer will be on site to do the attic insulation anyway. I may also decide to insulate the cavities with fiberglass batts myself, and the consequences of a “do-it-yourself” quality job will be minimized by the continuous exterior insulation.With my sheathing nestled within the wall’s thermal boundary, the ratio of exterior to interior insulation is 1.38 (29/21), which is safely above the 0.7 minimum that the IECC calls for to allow a Class III vapor retarder to be used. Thus, my interior vapor retarder will be two layers of standard latex paint on the interior side of all exterior walls. I considered, for a time, that maybe I should still install a polyamide (“smart”) vapor retarder on the warm side, but at the end of the day I convinced myself that it isn’t necessary.I am the kind of person who might cut into my walls in a few years to see how the sheathing looks. When I do, I’ll send in the report. For now, we are going full speed ahead to enclose the structure before the deep Minnesota snow falls. I have already made a few concessions to keep the builder happy, so look forward to those in the next installment. I am an architect. I have spent the last five years thinking about, sketching, drafting, changing, overanalyzing, second guessing, and fretting about the house that my partner Catherine and I would someday build on our rural land in northern Minnesota. This is probably not unlike the experience of many non-architect dreamers, but the difference is that I am armed with AutoCAD and REMDesign energy modeling software to analyze every conceivable scenario.I also like building science. The firm that I work for, Wagner Zaun Architecture, encourages me to learn and think hard about many aspects of building performance, durability, cost effectiveness, and efficiency, and how they all relate to design and aesthetics. This, as many of you will attest, leads to more questions… and fear. If I push the thermal performance, will I compost my walls? The energy model says 12,000 BTU/h is my peak load: Is that really enough? Will the builder laugh at my “brilliant” flashing detail that took me three hours to draw?Despite my background, I am burdened with the same issues that all other dreamers are. I have a not-quite-big-enough budget. I want a house that is not too big and not too small. I want an energy-efficient house with passive solar features that doesn’t look like the awkward love-child of the Saskatchewan Conservation House and an Earthship. I want a house that is beautiful and durable. I want a house that is environmentally sensitive and responsible. I want a house that enters into a conversation with our land, not one that holds dominion over it. I want a house that I will love. A single-story house with a slab-on-grade foundationOn October 12, 2015, the rubber hit the road and we started construction. I can’t endlessly tweak (fuss over) plans and details any longer. The bank owns my soul, and the excavator is on site making a house-shaped scar on our previously pristine site.This installment is an explanation of the concepts employed in the design of our dream house, with reflection on some of the choices and struggles. This will be followed with future ruminations on progress, lessons learned, and concessions made in the face of reality.The “final” design is a one-story, slab-on-grade house (see Images #2 and #3, below). It is a two-bedroom, 1 1/2-bath home with an additional small office for farm operations. The main house is 1,668 gross square feet (1,575 conditioned square feet) with an additional 250 square foot screened porch.As I said, I am a building science nerd, so I’ll cut to the quick. The stats for the house are as follows:Climate Zone 7, with 9,500 HDD and 250 CDDA dead-flat site with good solar exposureUnder slab insulation: a continuous horizontal layer (8 inches) of Type IX EPS (R-35)Walls: 2×6 framed structural cavity wall with R-21 dense-packed cellulose or fiberglass batts, with the structural Zip sheathing serving as an air barrier, and 7 3/8-inch EPS nailbase panels on the exterior (R-29) for a total of R-50Ceiling: Engineered roof trusses with 20-inch-deep energy heel and 24 inches of blown cellulose (R-80)Windows: Duxton Fiberglass windows with 1 3/8-inch triple-pane IGUs with argon gas fill and Cardinal 180 coatings on surfaces #2 and #5; center-of-glass specs: U-factor = 0.13; SHGC = 0.56, VT = 70%Airtightness target: 1 ach50 or lessThe design goal for the house was to take full advantage of the good solar exposure and to reduce the mechanical load to a level where a minisplit heat pump would take care of the majority of my heating needs. Although we have very few cooling degree days, the notion of air conditioning and humidity control is appealing to me, which also prompted the desire to use a minisplit.I wanted to have an all-electric house so that I could eventually offset the majority, if not all of my consumption with photovoltaic (PV) panels. Aside from a propane cooktop (one of the few requests from my very patient partner), which will be fed from a 100-gallon propane bottle, the house will be entirely electric. Although our region’s current electrical grid supply is very coal-dependent and propane is cheaper, I rationalized that I am reducing my load to a point that I can easily offset it with PV later, and I won’t be reliant on a propane delivery truck. Also, I am more afraid of gas than electricity, which may not be totally rational, but I am calling the shots. Elden Lindamood is an architect with Wagner Zaun Architecture in Duluth, Minnesota.center_img A frost-protected shallow foundationThe first item I grappled with was the foundation. I initially wanted a frost-depth stem wall (which is 5’-0” below grade here) just because it “felt right.” However, in the face of incremental cost increases and above-grade wall changes discussed below, I eventually arrived at a frost-protected shallow foundation.Another factor influencing the choice was the very high water table on our site. I have dug many post holes on the site that fill up with water three feet down.Once construction started, we discovered that creating the foundation forms with foam is fairly time-consuming (see Image #1 at the top of the page), and for future projects I want to look into a flat structural slab sitting in a simpler tub of foam. They might require a thicker slab with more steel, but the labor savings might be better than the additional cost to form a thickened-edge slab. RELATED ARTICLES A Superinsulated House in Rural Minnesota Q&A: How risky is a single layer nailbase SIP over a single stud wall with sealed sheathing? Frost-Protected Shallow Foundations Heating and cooling provided by a ducted minisplitThe mechanicals are as follows:Heating/cooling: Ducted Fujitsu 12RLFCD minisplit heat pump, single zone; backup consists of 6 electric radiant cove panels with individual thermostatic controls, totaling 3,450 watts; a small wood stove in the center of the houseDomestic hot water: 50 gallon electric-resistance Marathon storage tank water heaterElectric clothes dryer with through-the-wall exhaustElectric oven with a propane cooktop and a range hood rated at less than 300 cfm; makeup air unit with 1000-watt electric resistance heater tied to the range hood and clothes dryerVenmar E15 HRV, exhausting bathrooms and near kitchen, and supplying into the minisplit supply ducts.I intend to monitor the electrical usage on the main house feed along with the individual radiant cove circuits to determine how often they kick on and under what conditions. We also have 30 acres of poplar woods to feed the woodstove. Poplar isn’t great firewood, but it is free and I’ll have more than enough deadfall to keep us warm after the energy apocalypse.last_img read more

Jones-Cormier rematch headlines outstanding UFC 214 card

first_imgMOST READ Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Jones’ yearlong suspension has ended, and the UFC put him right back in a title shot with Cormier, who dutifully defended the belt during the mercurial ex-champion’s absence. Cormier, an ex-Olympian and family man who also works as a television commentator, sees every flaw in Jones’ makeup.“He’s a guy who can’t stop hurting himself and people around him,” Cormier said. “He’s a talented athlete, but mixed martial arts aren’t just about the best athlete. He’s weak mentally. He’s got problems, and I don’t know if he solved them yet.”Jones plays it cool when talking about Cormier, yet their promotional staredowns have usually devolved into trash-talking and physical drama. They got into an infamous brawl in a Las Vegas casino lobby in 2014 during the early stages of their promotion of the first bout.They exchanged harsh words again this week in a faceoff, but Jones has vowed to be classy after he wins their rematch.“He’s a good dude,” Jones said. “I want the best for him, I really do. I wish he was just man enough to realize that he’s (in) the wrong era. He just happened to come into the sport, he’s 39 years old, and he’s (fighting) a guy who’s in his prime, a guy who’s doing everything in his power to make sure this is his era. I wish he could just swallow that and say, ‘I’m the baddest (man) outside Jon Jones, and I can go to sleep with that.’”The UFC 214 pay-per-view card starts with two absolute corkers: Veteran brawlers Robbie Lawler and Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone meet after light heavyweight prospects Jimi Manuwa and Volkan Oezdemir. Even the undercard is strong, featuring fights for Ricardo Lamas, Renan Barao, Aljamain Sterling and Brian Ortega.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ But the remarkable main event could be the culmination of Cormier’s career or a monumental return for Jones, whose career and life have been severely fractured since their first bout.“It’s pretty cool that it ends here,” Jones said recently, speaking of both his disputes with Cormier and his own winding path back to the top. “There will be no grudge match. There will be no trilogy. Like I say all the time, Daniel Cormier is not my rival. I have no issue with him.”Jones’ biggest issues have always been with himself.Jones reached the pinnacle of his sport when he soundly defeated Cormier in January 2015 to defend his UFC 205-pound title. Practically nothing has gone right in the ensuing 2 1/2 years for Jones, whose capacity for self-sabotage and lousy decision-making surpassed even his incredible MMA talent.The UFC stripped Jones of its title twice — after a hit-and-run accident in which he broke a pregnant woman’s arm, and again after he was revealed to have failed a doping test four days before fighting Cormier at UFC 200 last July.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Everything about Jones’ behavior suggests he might have stronger feelings than he acknowledges. When they finally hit the Honda Center cage on Saturday night, he’ll have a chance to show how he really feels.“A guy like Daniel, he has my full, undivided attention,” Jones said this week. “He says that he’s in my head, and that’s exactly where I want him to be, because he is in my head. I think about him all the time. That’s what makes me do the things I do.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsJones and Cormier are headlining the UFC’s best show of the summer, and likely the entire year, in Orange County.UFC 214 features three title fights and numerous rising stars. Before Jones and Cormier, welterweight champion Tyron Woodley takes on Brazilian jiu-jitsu master Demian Maia in a compelling clash of styles, and pound-for-pound women’s superstar Cris “Cyborg” Justino faces Invicta champion Tonya Evinger for the vacant featherweight title. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 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If Cormier wasn’t Jones’ bitter enemy, the UFC light heavyweight champion probably could could give sound advice to Jones, the troubled former champ. Instead, the steady Cormier realizes he needs a victory over his self-sabotaging archrival on Saturday, July 29, 2017, at UFC 214 to validate his own title reign. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)ANAHEIM, Calif.— Jon Jones insists Daniel Cormier isn’t his rival, not even when their rematch at UFC 214 is the most anticipated mixed martial arts fight of the year.Jones says he doesn’t even dislike Cormier, the man who has spent most of the past 2 1/2 years holding the light heavyweight title belt that Jones considers rightfully his.ADVERTISEMENT Younghusband brothers set for Davao move on 5-year deal View commentslast_img read more