Letter to the Editor: The Sad State of PUSD Teachers

first_img Community News Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe 10 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * For the last 23 years – 10 in the Pasadena Unified School District – I have dedicated my life to teaching children with special needs. I have been rewarded for my loyalty and perseverance by PUSD with one 3% raise a couple of years ago: after years of furlough days, benefit cost increases, and five (yes, FIVE) superintendents. When we teachers of PUSD agreed to the furlough days, we were told that our salaries and benefits would be “restored and enhanced” when the district had the money. Now the district has nearly $10 million in unallocated funds and instead of keeping their promise to the teachers of the district, they continue to ignore us – literally. Instead they spend money on phone systems (that fail), purchase computer programs and implement mandatory use of them (despite their uselessness), and continue to practice costly nepotism at the district’s administrative level. The teachers of PUSD are already among the lowest paid in the region. There is a looming teacher shortage. There are vacancies the district hasn’t been able to fill since the beginning of the 15/16 school year and Thirty Three teachers resigned in March. Who do you want teaching your children?Sincerely,Laurel More Cool Stuff HerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTips From A Professional Stylist On How To Look Stunning In 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like An Eye-Candy And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Opinion & Columnists Letter to the Editor: The Sad State of PUSD Teachers By LAUREL WARE Published on Friday, March 25, 2016 | 12:51 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Business News Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy last_img read more

Geographic variation in the foraging behaviour of South American fur seals

first_imgThe implicit assumption of many ecological studies is that animal behaviour and resource use are geographically uniform. However, central place foraging species often have geographically isolated breeding colonies that are associated with markedly different habitats. South American fur seals Arctocephalus australis (SAFS) are abundant and widely distributed colonial breeding central place foragers that provide potentially useful insights into geographic variation in animal behaviour and resource use. However, SAFS movement ecology is poorly understood. To address knowledge gaps and to explicitly test geographic variation in behaviour, we examined the foraging behaviour of 9 adult female SAFS from 2 Falkland Islands breeding colonies separated in distance by 200 km. A total of 150 foraging trips over 7 mo revealed striking colony differences. Specifically, SAFS that bred at Volunteer Rocks undertook long foraging trips (mean ± SD: 314 ± 70 km and 15.2 ± 2.7 d) to the Patagonian Shelf and shelf slope (bathymetric depth: 263 ± 28 m). In contrast, SAFS that bred at North Fur Island undertook short foraging trips (94 ± 40 km and 5.3 ± 2.1 d) and typically foraged near the Falkland Islands coastline (bathymetric depth: 85 ± 24 m). Stable isotope analysis of vibrissae δ13C and δ15N values also revealed colony differences in the isotopic niche area occupied, which indicated that resource use also differed. Contrary to popular models (Ashmole’s halo, hinterland model), colony size was unrelated to distance travelled, and SAFS did not necessarily use foraging grounds closest to their breeding colony. SAFS are likely subject to different selective pressures related to different environmental demands at the 2 breeding colonies. Accordingly, we reason that behavioural differences between breeding colonies reflect different phenotypes, and habitat use is more immediately influenced by phenotype, philopatry and the local environment, rather than density-dependent competition typically attributed to colony segregation in foraging areas.last_img read more

Managing construction’s return to a ‘new normal’

first_imgGAZETTE: With both Cambridge and Boston taking phased approaches to restarting construction, how are you working with local officials as these projects begin to resume?GARBARINI:  Since the implementation of the construction ban in March, key members of the University have been coordinating closely with state and local officials to ensure full compliance with the orders. We have maintained essential safety functions while further construction has been on hold, and as we begin this phased approach to restarting these projects, we are in constant communication with local officials to ensure our sites are complying with state and local guidelines.GAZETTE: The economic slowdown caused by COVID-19 has had a significant financial impact on the University. Could you speak to how that will impact capital projects?WEENICK: As [Executive Vice President] Katie Lapp outlined in her message to the community last week, one of the University’s planned cost saving measures is reviewing all capital projects. This generally means that those that are still in the design or planning phases will be subject to further review by the University to determine if moving forward currently is advisable. Based on that review, some projects will be deferred to make funds available in the near term for other University needs. In general, construction projects currently underway will proceed toward completion.Our teaching and research mission will drive decision-making as we prioritize which projects will proceed and which will be put on hold. As the University considers near-term spending on projects, those which are essential and support research, teaching, and learning will come first.Interview was edited for clarity and condensed for space. GAZETTE: Studies have shown that Massachusetts has begun to flatten the curve, but risk remains. How is the University keeping workers safe as they return to campus? GARBARINI:  It will be far from business as usual for work that does resume. We will be working with all our contractors to ensure that each of them incorporates all appropriate recommendations of health officials at every level. For example, every person visiting or working on a site will be required to use the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and make appropriate use of the handwashing stations provided at each project. We will also be requiring that social distancing recommendations are met at construction sites and building entry points by using staggered start times and alternate entries in some cases. Populated places such as lunch areas and parking lots will be dispersed in order to reduce person-to-person interactions. When a task absolutely requires two or more people near one another, enhanced PPE measures will be used.For reasons such as building occupancy and shared use of public spaces, renovations to existing buildings pose different challenges than new construction. Each project requires its own solutions, and our team is working with our contractors to confirm implementation of appropriate safety guidelines that are tailored to the needs of each specific site.GAZETTE: Why is it important to resume work on these projects as soon as possible?O’FARRELL:  Moving forward on construction as quickly as the cities’ phased approaches permit is important because there are several external factors that pose potential risks to any construction site, including those on campus, if left vacant for more than a few months. Our teams across campus did excellent work mitigating those risks when we put projects on hold as we vacated campus in March, but they need to return as quickly as possible to assure that no further risks are introduced by leaving the sites in a state of incompletion.With the summer bringing more extreme weather in the region, construction sites that are not fully enclosed will run the risk of wind or water damage. Each site must be safely and completely enclosed to limit this risk, a process that can take anywhere from several months to a year. The sooner crews can resume building enclosures, the less likely it is that buildings will be affected.Cold weather can also damage the structures, and although the next round of freezing temperatures is months away, many projects develop their schedule around the seasons. For example, exteriors are prioritized in the spring, summer, and fall months, which are better conditions for outside work, and interiors are mostly done in the winter, so people are not overexposed to the elements. Further delays may cause significant issues with buildings trying to get enclosed before the temperature drops. “… one of the University’s planned cost saving measures is reviewing all capital projects. This generally means that those that are still in the design or planning phases will be subject to further review by the University to determine if moving forward currently is advisable.” — Meredith Weenick When students, faculty, and other personnel vacated campus in late March, Harvard’s lecture halls, offices, and community spaces weren’t the only areas left empty. The University’s many capital projects also had to quickly pivot from normal operations and leave sites across campus after Boston and Cambridge temporarily halted construction work to protect public health.Now, as each city has begun a phased approach to a “new normal,” some of those projects have started to resume operations.The Gazette spoke with Vice President for Campus Services Meredith Weenick, Director of Capital Projects for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Petrina Garbarini, and Managing Director of Harvard Capital Projects Joe O’Farrell to learn more about Harvard’s decision to restart construction.Q&AMeredith Weenick, Petrina Garbarini, and Joe O’FarrellGAZETTE: Can you walk us through the University’s decision to resume campus construction?WEENICK:  As Provost [Alan] Garber noted in his message to the University about planning for fall 2020, decisions at Harvard are complex, require immense planning, and are guided by our academic and research mission and our responsibility to ensure the safety of every member of our community. As we slowly move to resume things paused by the COVID-19 pandemic, capital projects are at the forefront because ensuring that our students, faculty, and staff have the appropriate resources to resume their work when we can all safely return to campus is at the very core of our mission.Knowing that the pause on construction would be lifted once it was determined it was safe to do so, we spent the past several months working internally and in concert with industry experts to carefully think about how we could move critical capital projects forward without sacrificing the health and safety of our workers and community.Consistent with the phased approaches of Cambridge and Boston, we made the decision to begin work again after we were sure that we could bring the necessary workforce back on campus in a manner consistent with the recommendations of the CDC, state, and local officials regarding best practices for limiting exposure to the virus on campus.Having said that, it is important to note that one of the most effective safety tools we have is the one that we instituted in March by reducing the density of people on our campus. By working and learning remotely, our students, faculty, and staff are playing an enormous role in making it safer for the workers who are on campus. Until repopulating the University becomes safe again, maintaining that social distancing is one of the best things we can do to protect our community. “Each project requires its own solutions, and our team is working with our contractors to confirm implementation of appropriate safety guidelines that are tailored to the needs of each specific site.” — Petrina Garbarinilast_img read more

Clichy: Vieira was never replaced

first_img “He was the guy putting in tackles and training as hard as anybody else so as a young player you have two ways of seeing this. Either you say, ‘Wow this guy is the captain of the club, has won this, won that, if he is training like this I cannot do less. I will not be better than him because quality is quality but in terms of commitment and hard work, I have to match that.’ “Then you have those players who will think, ‘If this guy is behaving like this there’s no way I can catch him up so there’s no point for me to train.’ Unfortunately, I have seen players behave like this and have that attitude. read also:Vieira reveals Arsenal manager’s job admission after Arteta appointment “For me on my side I always thought, ‘If these guys are doing this, I cannot allow myself to do less.’ Again, it is not about quality but it is about commitment in training. I do feel that when Patrick left, we had great players coming in, but that space he had within the team, within the club, was perhaps too big to fill for any player.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Former Arsenal fullback, Gael Clichy, has lauded Patrick Vieira for his leadership skills. Vieira was the captain of Arsenal during one of their most successful periods, which included their Invincibles season of 2003/04. “Patrick was someone who, when he was on the pitch in training, I felt pressure,” Clichy told the club’s website. “Not because he was shouting at young players or because he was demanding too much, but just because of his charisma and the way he was.Advertisement Loading… Promoted Content7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too MuchCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterLaugh, Cry, Or Just Relax With The Best Series Streaming On HBO6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True12 Movies That Almost Ended Their Stars’ Careers6 Amazing Shows From The 90s That Need A Reboot Right NowPortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D Graffiti10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By OdeithWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?Ever Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This Daylast_img read more

‘Opening up Test not in West Indies’s best interest’

first_imgSYDNEY, Australia (CMC): West Indies captain Jason Holder says he rejected a proposal from his opposite number Steve Smith to open up the third and final Test with a dramatic last-day run chase, because he did not believe such a scenario was in the best interest of the team’s development. With rain allowing just 68 deliveries on day two and forcing the abandonment of the third and fourth days, the Test was predictably headed for a draw when play finally resumed on Thursday’s final day at the Sydney Cricket Ground. The proposal would have seen West Indies declaring at their overnight 248 for seven, Australia then forfeiting their first innings, allowing the visitors to rattle up 121 off seven overs and then attempting to chase down 370 off 70 overs for victory. “He came to us and made an offer. I just went back to the team and we thought at this stage of our development, it wasn’t the best thing for us,” Holder told a media conference following the drawn contest. “We had (Denesh) Ramdin, who was scoring well and looking well, so [we decided to] give him the encouragement to go out there and build an innings and build some confidence. “We set out at the beginning of the series to make sure to bat 90 overs each time we batted and get past the 300 mark. That was one of the things that we wanted to achieve today and we achieved that.” Holder said with the disappointing series the Windies had experienced Down Under, it was more important for them to achieve team goals. “It was a team vote and a team decision. We started in Hobart and we didn’t play well at all there. We showed improvement in Melbourne, and we just had to come here to improve as well.”I think we just need to take it step by step; it’s not a case where you can just jump from losing Test matches to winning in one transition, especially against good opposition like Australia.” Australia won the series 2-0 after victories in Hobart and Melbourne in the first two Tests.last_img read more

South Africa gets new gem-polishing plant

first_imgMatla Diamond Polishing Plant opened anew plant in the Eastern Cape that willboost South Africa’s diamond industry (Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Zwelakhe Sisulu Matla Innovation Company +27 11 245 7900 RELATED ARTICLES • Kimberley goes for gold • Mercedes-Benz SA tops for quality • Business school to expand in Africa • Record price for SA diamondNosimilo Ramela South Africa will soon be able to process more of its own diamonds, thanks to the new Matla Diamond Polishing Plant in the Eastern Cape province.Speaking at the launch of the East London-based facility on 28 July 2010, Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu said: “As a department, we want value added to our raw materials, making sure that our people get jobs and contribute to the economic activity of the country.”The R102-million (US$13.9-million) project is a partnership between Matla Beneficiation Company, the East London Industrial Development Zone, the Industrial Development Corporation and Gold Eastern Holdings of China.The automated plant is equipped with technology worth R35-million ($4.7-million) from China, and is expected to be eight times more efficient than a similar-sized manual operation.It will produce a maximum of 20 000 carats a month – this translates to R100-million ($13.6-million) in monthly revenue, according to the current market environment, said Matla Group executive chairperson Zwelakhe Sisulu.In 2009 a US news channel msnbc reported that India spent R73 ($10) per carat in polishing and cutting diamonds, while China spent R124 ($17) and South Africa R438 ($60). The new plant hopes to spend between R183 and R292 ($25 and $40) per carat in the first year, and match China’s figures in the next five years.Employment opportunitiesMatla Group CEO Chia-Chao Wu said the company plans to train 150 to 200 South Africans to become cutters and polishers. At the moment there are 25 previously disadvantaged individuals from the Eastern Cape employed at the plant. A further 120 skilled job opportunities are expected to be created over the next two years and more than 500 in the next five years.Shabangu said government welcomed the initiative to source and train employees locally.“I’d like to see this process of training translated into professionalism – a professionalism where these young people will be able one day to open their own factories,” she said.The Matla Group has employed 25 Chinese nationals on a two-year contract to train local staff in diamond polishing.“We really are going with great gusto into what we see as the knowledge economy, because in the world now, if you want to be competitive you have to have knowledge, skill and discipline as the basis,” Sisulu said.Plant to make SA more competitiveOnly 2% of local diamonds are currently processed in South Africa, with the remainder mainly being sent to non-diamond producing countries in the East. Sisulu said this was unfortunate.Mcebisi Jonas, of the Eastern Cape’s Department of Economic Development and Environmental Affairs, agreed: “While South Africa remains a leading diamond producer, there is very little local polishing of rough stones. The bulk of these are exported for further polishing in countries such as India and China.”This joint venture, together with the latest technology, will go a long way in increasing the country’s competitiveness in the diamond-polishing industry, he said.last_img read more

USDA numbers neutral on July 11

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Doug Tenney, Leist MercantileWhat will USDA give us today? How will they affect my bottom line?That is the gargantuan (adjective for the day) question farmers are asking. They continue to be in shock with the most surprising corn acres number provided with the June 28 Acres Report. This report had U.S. corn acres at 91.7 million acres while soybean acres were estimated at 80 million acres. What happened to prevent planted corn acres talked about for weeks ahead of that report? Corn acres were a huge bearish surprise, with December CBOT corn closing down 19 ½ cents at $4.31 ½ on the June 28 report day. Trader estimates ahead of the report estimated corn acres at 86-87 million acres. Soybean acres were a huge bullish surprise as the November CBOT soybeans closed at $9.23, up 10 ¾ cents that same day. Trader estimates had been 84 million acres.Corn acres unchanged, yield unchanged, ending stocks up but below trade estimates. Soybean acres unchanged, yield lower one bushel, ending stocks lower and below trade estimates. Shortly after report release corn down 2 cents, soybeans up 1 cent, wheat up 4 cents.Today numbers will not be a one hit wonder. All will be looking at acres. In addition, analysts will be considering U.S. exports, U.S. ending stocks, stocks to use ratios, and finally global production and ending stocks. Trading ranges could be brisk and most volatile.Prior to the report corn was down two cents, while soybeans and wheat were down one cent. Many had expected the corn numbers to be bearish with lower exports and higher ending stocks.Weather concerns are not going away with warm and dry seen into the weekend across the Midwest. A tropical storm has already brought nine inches of rain to parts of Louisiana this week. Its remnants may or may not reach into Kansas and Missouri where some of the driest conditions exist.It has been a hard spring for producers in Ohio and across the Midwest. Planting has not been fun at all with the many rain delays and late plantings for corn and soybeans. Producers wanted to forget the wet fall from last year. Unfortunately, it has carried into this year with even more stress and uncertainty. This week Ohio’s farmers are still planting the first crop soybeans in numerous locations. It is easy to see that corn and soybean development is 20-30 days behind normal. Throw in the words, “early frost” to bring on even more uncertainty for final corn and soybean yields.Today and the weeks which follow continue to be the battle of the decade. Demand bears point to U.S. export demand shrinking for corn, soybeans, and wheat. They have plenty of ammunition with huge corn supplies with South America, Brazil exporting more and more soybeans to China while the U.S. exports have fallen off the map, along with big wheat production from Russia which has benefitted from timely rains. Supply bulls continue to point to a record wet spring, the wettest in 125 years. Crop development for corn and soybeans is behind normal.In the eastern U.S. Corn Belt, Ohio’s old crop corn basis levels are at decades’ high numbers. Numerous Ohio locations are September plus 30 to 60 cents. Basis levels have increased weekly by nickels and even multiple dimes from mid-May forward in numerous Ohio locations, especially in western Ohio. Old corn has not moved as expected with producers holding onto corn for more money, especially if they have not been able to plant normal acres of corn. This delayed movement of old corn has contributed greatly to the basis levels currently seen. No producer wants to be left standing when the music stops. When the party is over, those dimes could be multiple dimes lower in just days.The meteorological term “ring of fire,” with the extreme heat seen in the Midwest this week has easily replaced “trains of rain,” which took place in May.Look for weather and yields to once again return to the forefront in price direction. This change could easily be within minutes of the noon Eastern Time report release.last_img read more

Your Midyear Startup Checkup: Are You On Target?

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#Analysis#start A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img 2010 is over half over, which makes it a good time to reflect on the year so far and revise your startup’s plans – if necessary, of course – for the year ahead. Are you on target? Have your targets changed? And if so, have you adjusted course to compensate?Mark MacLeod posted his thoughts on the midyear point on the Startup CFO blog today, noting that it can be difficult for startups to establish accurate targets. Even so, he notes, there are two schools of thoughts when it comes to targets. The first: you set the targets, now stick with them. The second: if you can’t meet the targets, it only makes sense to adjust.If you’ve determined that, indeed, your targets need adjusting, MacLeod suggests the following: Diagnose: “Hold a post mortem,” he writes, “ideally involving much or all of your team.” What went wrong? Were the targets unreasonable? If so, why were they set in the first place? If the targets were reasonable, why weren’t they attained? What can be done about that?Reset: Now that you have new insights into your performance, you can set new targets – making sure that your investors support them, of course.Communicate: After you’ve reviewed your year-to-date performance, make sure you share that diagnosis with your whole team. Explain not only what the new targets are, but why the targets are changing.Partial Mulligan: If employees’ compensation is tied to meeting targets, MacLeod argues that “resetting targets should not be the equivalent of a Mulligan. You need to retain some incentive to hit the new targets, but unless your diagnosis tells you that the targets were flawed to begin with, there should be consequences (in terms of reduced incentive) as a result of lowering your targets.”Revising your targets may involve slight tweaks or it might mean major upheaval. As Chris Dixon writes on the subject of pivoting, “You aren’t throwing away what you’ve learned or the good things you’ve built. You are keeping your strong leg grounded and adjusting your weak leg to move in a new direction.” 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market audrey watterslast_img read more

Taken for Granted: The Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury on Sense of Identity and Family Relationships

first_imgmilitraryfamilimiliBy: David Lee Sexton, Jr.Pixabay [Brain Biology by Geralt , CC0]Not Just a Problem on the Football FieldAccording to Knock (2017), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) refers to an injury in which something impacts an individual’s head, which many may not inherently recognize as what is commonly known as a concussion. The difference in nomenclature between these two synonymous words may lead some to perceive a concussion as something far less serious than a TBI. However, Knock clarifies that a concussion is a TBI, and there are varying grades of TBI ranging from Grade One to Grade Three. Furthermore, 80% of TBI are considered Grade One, or mild, yet even a mild TBI can result in chronic problems. Interestingly, Knock points out that TBIs can manifest vastly different symptoms depending on the part of the brain which sustains the brunt of the impact.This phenomenon has been brought to public attention recently through the film, Concussion, which examines the discovery of the relationship between TBI and mental health problems in professional football players. However, athletes are not the only ones prone to a higher risk of sustaining TBI, as combat veterans are also at higher risk due to injuries, such as blast injuries that affect the brain through tearing of the axons at a microscopic level (Knock, 2017). These types of injuries are even more sinister, as they are often not detectable through common brain scanning measures, such as MRI (Knock, 2017).Loss of IdentityIn a brief anecdote, Knock (2017) demonstrates the insidiousness of TBI by relaying the story of one veteran’s struggle to accomplish something many of us take for granted: packing a lunch. After being caught in an IED, she suffered damage to her parietal lobe. This resulted in disturbances with her visual and spatial reasoning that made her unable to even select the right size container to hold a packed lunch. With the added struggle of completing tasks that were once effortless, it can be difficult to maintain a sense of self, which leaves one vulnerable to further struggles with chronic depression as new limitations are being discovered.Impact on FamiliesSome of the most profound limitations TBI can impose on an individual will be family-related. Depending on severity, TBI can change familial roles so drastically that one individual’s spouse may become a caregiver in an instant (Knock, 2017). In this case, feelings of loss and frustration will likely affect both individuals. Knock (2017) provides an example of how drastically family dynamic can change through the act of caring for children. After suffering a TBI, a parent may no longer be able to safely watch over his or her children, due to potential memory or attention problems. This not only represents an enormous loss for the parent suffering the TBI but may cause additional strain for his or her partner due to the new responsibility of caring for both children and spouse. Again, this brings to light the impact TBI can have on things that people often take for granted, and demonstrates the influence something like a “bump on the head” can have on a person’s life and well-being.Want to Learn More?To learn more about Traumatic Brain Injury and its effects on families, please take some time to watch the MFLN Family Development Team’s free, archived webinar presented by Heidi Knock, Psy.D., Staff Psychologist at Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Knock provides individual, marital, and group psychotherapy to Veterans and their families. She also treats individuals on the polytrauma unit and the inpatient rehabilitation unit who have a combination of complex mental and physical health issues, such as Traumatic Brain Injury, chronic pain, amputation, and posttraumatic stress disorder.Also, get social with us on Facebook and Twitter to learn about more great content, webinars, and free CEU opportunities in the future.ReferencesKnock, H. (2017). Gray Matters: Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury’s impact on families. MFLN Family Development. Retrieved from: https://militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org/event/27283.This post was written by a member of the MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development team on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more

9 months agoChelsea striker Giroud: Cesc a great opportunity for Monaco

first_imgChelsea striker Giroud: Cesc a great opportunity for Monacoby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveOlivier Giroud has no doubts former Chelsea teammate Cesc Fabregas will be a success with AS Monaco.Cesc left Chelsea last week for ASM and made his debut in last night’s 1-1 draw at Olympique Marseille.Giroud told Telefoot: “Cesc is a great player, he has this quality of vision of the game, of intelligence of passes. “He’s one of the best players I’ve played with. “This is a great opportunity for Monaco.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more