South Africans urged to support the 2016 Community Survey

first_imgSouth Africans are being urged to open their doors to fieldworkers – more than 10 000 of them – going into communities to gather information from 1.3-million households for Statistics South Africa’s 2016 Community Survey, an essential tool in service delivery.From 7 March to 22 April the fieldworkers will gather data on the number of people in South Africa, where they live, their standard of living, and more.The survey was launched on Monday 29 February with a call to citizens to show their support: “Open up your doors and allow the team to come in. South Africa counts because you count.’The launch was held in Mamelodi East near Pretoria, at the Ikageng Community Hall, one of 330 venues around the country where the fieldworkers are being trained.The Community Survey is Stats SA’s second-largest information-gathering exercise after the national census. Last held in 2007, the survey’s main objective is to provide demographic and socioeconomic data at municipal level, to improve government planning.The basic information it gathers includes people’s level of education, the dwellings they live in, statistics on income and ownership of household goods, access to electricity and piped water, and types of toilets. Data is also collected on fertility, cause of death, migration, home ownership and much more.High-tech survey toolsThis year, digital technology will boost the efficiency and size of the survey. Instead of filling out households’ information on paper, fieldworkers will be able to capture it on electronic devices. This “computer-assisted paper interview’, or Capi, method will allow over a million dwellings to be surveyed, up from 300 000 in 2007. And it cuts the cost per dwelling from R2 000 to R200 – a tenfold decrease.Inbuilt controls in the electronic questionnaire will also improve the quality of the data collected. Geographic navigation capabilities will ensure that fieldworkers gather information from the right areas, as selected for the survey.The technology will also speed up the release of the survey results. Census 2011 results were only available a year after the raw data was collected. The 2016 Community Survey results will be released by the end of June – two months after all the households have been surveyed.The speedy delivery of the results will be especially useful for the upcoming municipal elections, to be held countrywide later this year. The survey will give voters objective data on what services have been delivered to what areas, as well as what yet remains to be done.“The citizenry will be able to make decisions based on this enormously helpful body of evidence,’ Stats SA Africa said in a statement. “But more importantly they will know what they as citizens have to do in order to change their lives.’Up-to-date information will also allow municipal officials to plan properly, helping to deepen democracy at the local level. Municipalities will be required to deliver to constituencies that can hold them to account because of the almost instantaneous availability of new data.“Statistics should be embraced as a fundamental part of our democracy, a conduit of trust among citizens, among nations,’ Stats SA said. “Statistics can help to improve the quality of democratic debate by providing reliable indicators, vital for decision-making.’For more information on the survey contact the call centre on 0800 110 248.Source: South African Government News Agencylast_img read more

SA sends first batch of maize to Lesotho

first_img22 November 2013 South Africa will on Friday transport its first consignment of maize to Lesotho, which has been experiencing a food crisis since July 2012. Earlier this year, South Africa struck a deal with the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to buy maize from the country’s smallholder farmers as part of a R180-million South African humanitarian donation to Lesotho. “Friday’s consignment is the first of many that are planned for Lesotho. Several more trips will be made in January next year with maize from smallholder farmers from the Eastern Cape, the North West and Limpopo,” Department of Agriculture spokesperson Palesa Mokomele said this week. Maize from the Zivuseni agricultural co-operative and the Ziyibane farming project milled at the Pride Milling plant in Nigel, in Gauteng, was packaged into 4 920 bags each weighing 25 kilograms and would be transported to Lesotho, Mokomele said. Mokomele said Friday’s initiative was a joint venture with the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, the WFP and the Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Social Development. “The WFP, which is an internationally recognised agency of the United Nations, will channel and distribute the maize meal to the school meals programme, health and nutrition activities in Lesotho,” Mokomele said. Lesotho food crisis In July 2012, Lesotho Prime Minister Thomas Thabane declared an emergency food crisis and formally requested support from development partners and the international community. Following a meeting with President Jacob Zuma in October 2012, the South African government, through the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, responded to the appeal with a donation of R180-million. “One of the conditions of this agreement from the South African government’s side was that at least 40 percent of the white, non-GMO [genetically modified] maize must be purchased from smallholder farmers in South Africa,” Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson said earlier this year. “Our country’s aid will help provide up to 22 months of food security for 227 000 children and pregnant and breastfeeding women in Lesotho.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

South African Human Rights culture discussed in Mahikeng

first_imgMahikeng, Wednesday 26 March 2014 – Brand South Africa, in the fourth Play Your Part/Sowetan Dialogue on Wednesday 26 March 2014, hosted a robust discussion on fundamental human rights and the responsibility of citizens in our country.Participating in the discussion at the Mmabatho Civic Centre were the Chairperson of the Independent Electoral Commission – Advocate Pansy Tlakula, Chairperson of the South African Human Rights Commission – Advocate Lawrence Mushwana, Southern Africa director of the Africa Division of Human Rights Watch – Ms Tiseke Kasambala, and Ms Folusho Mvubu of the Department of Public Service and Administration responsible for Service Delivery Improvement Support.In the discussions, Advocate Tlakula invited participants to reflect on South Africa’s journey towards a human rights culture over the past two decades.  In this, it is important to counter-balance, amongst others, rights and culture. “We must also remember that values are important in building societies.  The protection and safeguarding of human rights should not mean we lose core values like respect and discipline.  Perhaps we need to have a very deep conversation on these issues,” said Advocate Tlakula.Meanwhile, the issue of human right and culture was also brought into focus by Ms Kasambala.  “What is however important is the fact that human rights are important to protect all human beings and South Africa has created an enabling culture for this,” said Ms Kasambala.Advocate Mushwana advised the audience that the Human Rights Commission has prioritised the education of citizens about their rights because one cannot protect and defend what they do not know.  “With each right comes a responsibility.”  Awareness of your rights is also crucial to strengthen our reconciliation and build a cohesive society which will contribute to active citizenship.Saying that human rights are intrinsically linked to responsibility – in how one exercises these rights in addition to ensuring that the human rights of others are protected – Ms Mvubu of the Department of Public Service and Administration,also stressed that an informed and responsible citizenry is key to an active citizenry which is essential to the implementation of the National Development Plan.Comments by the panel were followed by thought provoking insight from the audience including, despite our differences we are essentially all human beings.  This means that while it is easy to demand our rights, we must as human beings, first and foremost protect the rights of our fellow human beings.  Legislation can only go so far in ensuring a redress of our country’s past inequalities – we must each play our part in making society safe for ourselves and others.A strong theme that emanated from the conversation was that a human rights based culture is our collective responsibility.  Government cannot create this society on its own.  We must all work together to achieve an equitable, human rights society.  This is a challenge to society as a whole as we commemorate 20 years of democracy.The discussion concluded with the sense that while South Africa has come a long way in 20 years, much work remains to be done to build a human rights based culture strongly rooted to the principle of responsibility based rights. Let us all play our part in this quest.Note to EditorsThe Constitution of South Africa can be accessed at: http://www.gov.za/documents/constitution/1996/a108-96.pdfAbout Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.About Play Your PartPlay Your Part is a nationwide campaign created to inspire, empower and celebrate active citizenship in South Africa.  It aims to lift the spirit of our nation by inspiring all South Africans to contribute to positive change, become involved and start doing – because a nation of people who care deeply for one another and the environment in which they live is good for everyone.Play Your Part is aimed at all South Africans – from corporates to individuals, NGOs to government, churches to schools, young to not so young.  It aims to encourage South Africans to use some of their time, money, skills or goods to contribute to a better future for all.There are numerous opportunities, big and small, for each and every South African to make a positive difference in the communities in which they live and operate. Play Your Part encourages them to act on these opportunities.The campaign is driven by the Brand South Africa. Further resources from Brand South AfricaMedia are invited to visit http://www.southafrica.info/ for further resources which can be reproduced without any copyright infringement.  Kindly attribute to Brand SouthAfrica.Join the conversation at:Follow Brand South [email protected]_SAhttps://twitter.com/Brand_SAhttps://www.facebook.com/BrandSouthAfricaTell us how you Play Your [email protected]://www.playyourpart.co.za/tellus-someoneFor more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Sandisiwe GugushePublic Relations International: Brand South AfricaTel: +27 11 712 5007 Mobile: +27 (0) 73 126 9128Email: [email protected]last_img read more

5 Simple Ways To Quickly Eliminate Burnout

first_imgI consider myself fortunate to believe that work is a game, and my life is my real work. If something is a game, you play. Work isn’t my life, but my life is my real work. I tend to work more hours than most people would want to work, and I am in a position to do so now. People who work many hours or do the same thing for many years often burnout. Here are five ways you can quickly eliminate burnout and find inspiration:Make Things Better: It is one thing to “have” to do something and quite another to “get” to do something. Like many platitudes, this one contains a truth worth observing, but for my money, the value is in making the idea practical and tactical. If you want to avoid burnout and rekindle your drive, start by deciding to make it better. The effort it takes to improve something causes you to draw on your imagination and your resourcefulness.Ask yourself, “How can I make this better?”Track Your Progress: Daniel Kahneman’s work suggests that people don’t want to be happy but desire to make progress. If you feel you are not progressing, not growing, not improving, not moving towards your goals, it’s easy to get burned out. Setting goals and tracking your progress can keep you motivated.Ask yourself, “How am I progressing?”Project Focused: I think of everything as a project. It has a beginning, a middle, and an end. Treating everything like a project is one way to ensure you have something on which you make progress. You feel a sense of accomplishment when you complete a project. You will likely discover your next project while you are working on one.Ask yourself, “What projects do I need to work on now?”Making Space to Explore: I schedule my weeks in advance, blocking time for what’s most important. What I don’t often write about is how much space I leave for things like reading, exploring, and finding ideas and inspiration. Creating space to explore refreshes your energy—and especially your creative energy.Ask yourself, “Am I making space to explore and refresh my thinking? Am I learning?”Doing Nothing: You rarely find me doing nothing, except for the times I am intentionally doing nothing. I meditate every day, even if it’s only for twenty minutes. I also use headphones to listen to binaural sound waves (sometimes Delta, sometimes Alpha, sometimes Gamma). I’ve recently read the idea that even a few minutes of unconsciousness is enough to reset.Maybe don’t ask yourself anything here. Instead, close your eyes and listen.I haven’t found that taking time off clears up burnout, even though there is every reason in the world to refresh and recover. What seems to work better is changing things up, pursuing new ideas, finding inspiration, and working to make things better. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more