‘Tear-Tear’ LD$50 in Circulation

first_imgOn Thursday, June 5, 2014, a customer of a local bank walked into the offices of the Daily Observer and in his hand was a wad of mutilated Liberian dollar banknotes. The banknotes were all in L$50 denomination valued at about L$600.00. Some of the notes were torn and taped; some had mixed serial numbers, while others just looked very bad.This bank customer, name withheld, explained that the mutilated bills were among thousands of Liberian dollars he withdrew from the local bank, name withheld. He alleged that the mutilated banknote was among the money the teller paid him. “I didn’t check the money at the counter because it was a huge amount. But when I got somewhere safer to check it, I observed that a huge amount of the money, mainly the L$50 bills, were mutilated,” he explained.The business desk of the Daily Observer is withholding the names of the local bank and the customer involved because he [customer] admitted that he didn’t check the money at the bank [counter] in line with banking policy.It is a major policy of banks requiring all customers to check their monies on the counter immediately after they are paid by the teller.Meanwhile, the Central Bank of Liberia (CBL) has a window at its Warren Street Banking Hall that accepts mutilated banknotes. This customer was immediately requested by our business desk to proceed to the CBL to change his mutilated money. Meanwhile, bank customers including the general public, have also complained about mutilated L$5 banknotes in circulation.Most bank customers complain about the mutilated L$5 at banking halls, with some going to the extent of refusing it because of the L$5 banknote are mutilated. Most businesses, to include market women and other traders, will not accept mutilated money from customers. As such, it is unclear why bank would circulate them.Nonetheless, mutilated bank notes are also a business opportunity for many yanna boys. Passing through Monrovia and its environs with a loudspeaker in hand, yanna boys announce that they will exchange ‘tear-tear’ money (mutilated banknotes) for good ones — for fifty percent of the value, that is. For example, a yanna boy will exchange a mutilated L$50 for L$25. Would the buyer rather lose the whole L$50 or at least get L$25 out of it? Yanna boys of course know about the Central Bank window, which most customers may not, or may not have the time to visit. A matter of opportunity cost.Such is the nature of business — one man’s problem is another man’s business idea. As such, while Liberians may be angry about getting tear-tear bank notes from their banks, business is probably booming for yanna boys.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

FOUR YEAR OLD CHILD OFFERED SWEETS TO GET INTO VAN

first_imgGardai have confirmed they are investigating an incident in which a four year old boy was approached by a motorist in a white van.The boy was playing in his garden at Silverhill in Bundoran when a van pulled up and a man asked him to get in to take him for sweets.The van, which could possibly be a Renault with southern registration plates, sped from the scene when the child’s mother came out form the house. A search of the town by Gardai could not recover a similar van. FOUR YEAR OLD CHILD OFFERED SWEETS TO GET INTO VAN was last modified: July 31st, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:bundoranChild abductionGardaivanlast_img read more

How to Secure Your Jailbroken iPhone

first_imgTags:#Apple#How To#mobile#news#web Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement sarah perez Earlier this week, the news of the first iPhone worm made its way around the net. Since the worm only targeted jailbroken devices and then only those which had the SSH program installed, there wasn’t a need for concern on the part of most iPhone users. However, a second hacker tool which uses the same security hole as the so-called iKee worm has reared its head and this one is far more dangerous. According to security firm Intego, the new hacker tool goes after personal data stored on the device including email, contacts, SMS messages, calendars, photos, music files, videos and any other data recorded by any iPhone app. In other words, if you’re the owner of a jailbroken phone, you should now be concerned. New iPhone Worm DiscoveredUnlike the relatively innocuous iKee worm which the creator designed more as a “public service” to alert users to the potential for malware on the iPhone, the new hacker tool, dubbed “iPhone/Privacy.A,” is the real deal. Where iKee simply switched the iPhone wallpaper to display a photo of singer Rick Astley (a nod to the internet meme of rickrolling), Privacy.A gives the user no indication that it is running on the device.The new hacker tool also operates a bit differently than iKee does, as it doesn’t have to sit on the iPhone itself in order to inflect its damage or spread. The hacker can either load the worm onto their personal device and then monitor the network for jailbroken devices to attack or they can load the malicious program onto a computer. As Intego points out in their post, this computer could be on a public network at an Internet cafe or retail store. In that scenario, the tool would then scan for any other jailbroken iPhones that came within range of the Wi-Fi network and attack them. How to Secure your iPhoneAlthough many jailbreakers are tech-savvy enough to know how to lock down their devices to protect themselves from attack, there are quite a few who have simply followed online instructions such asthese to perform the jailbreak. This group, while arguably somewhat tech-savvy, doesn’t necessarily know all the nitty-gritty details about the iPhone filesystem or its security mechanisms.To make it easy on these users, we’ve provided steps on how to change your iPhone’s root password – the common denominator required in order for the malware to gain access to your device. While some may argue there’s no need to change your root password if you haven’t also installed the SSH program, another necessary element for these attacks to work, we think that’s a little short-sighted. It would be easy enough for a malicious hacker to trick jailbreakers into installing SSH by bundling it with some other third-party application offered through underground App Stores like Cydida or Icy. By masquerading as something innocent like a wallpaper-changer or ringtone bundle, a hacker could easily set up a number of jailbreakers with SSH without the victims even being aware that it has been installed. Although we haven’t heard of anything like this happening yet, if we thought of it then you can bet that the hackers out there have thought of it too. Changing the Root PasswordThe best protection is to simply change your iPhone root password. That will keep you safe from the current iPhone malware…as least for now. Here’s how:Install the MobileTerminal application from Cydia. Reboot your iPhone. Launch MobileTerminal and type in the command: passwdAt the prompt which asks for the “Old Password,” type in: alpineAt the new password prompt, type in a new password of your choosing, making sure to pick something strong. Re-enter the password to confirm. You’ll then be returned to the Mobile$ prompt which means the change was successful. Now you’ll need to change the password for the secondary admin. Type in the command login root.Again, you’re prompted for the old password. Type in alpine.Now type in the command passwdYou’ll then go through the change password routine a second time, entering in alpine as the old password, creating a new password and then re-entering it to confirm. When you are finished, close the application. Note: these instructions assume you are running iPhone OS 3.0 or higher.Update 11/16: Intego requested that the new attack be described as a “hacker tool,” not a worm. last_img read more