South African Human Rights culture discussed in Mahikeng

first_imgMahikeng, Wednesday 26 March 2014 – Brand South Africa, in the fourth Play Your Part/Sowetan Dialogue on Wednesday 26 March 2014, hosted a robust discussion on fundamental human rights and the responsibility of citizens in our country.Participating in the discussion at the Mmabatho Civic Centre were the Chairperson of the Independent Electoral Commission – Advocate Pansy Tlakula, Chairperson of the South African Human Rights Commission – Advocate Lawrence Mushwana, Southern Africa director of the Africa Division of Human Rights Watch – Ms Tiseke Kasambala, and Ms Folusho Mvubu of the Department of Public Service and Administration responsible for Service Delivery Improvement Support.In the discussions, Advocate Tlakula invited participants to reflect on South Africa’s journey towards a human rights culture over the past two decades.  In this, it is important to counter-balance, amongst others, rights and culture. “We must also remember that values are important in building societies.  The protection and safeguarding of human rights should not mean we lose core values like respect and discipline.  Perhaps we need to have a very deep conversation on these issues,” said Advocate Tlakula.Meanwhile, the issue of human right and culture was also brought into focus by Ms Kasambala.  “What is however important is the fact that human rights are important to protect all human beings and South Africa has created an enabling culture for this,” said Ms Kasambala.Advocate Mushwana advised the audience that the Human Rights Commission has prioritised the education of citizens about their rights because one cannot protect and defend what they do not know.  “With each right comes a responsibility.”  Awareness of your rights is also crucial to strengthen our reconciliation and build a cohesive society which will contribute to active citizenship.Saying that human rights are intrinsically linked to responsibility – in how one exercises these rights in addition to ensuring that the human rights of others are protected – Ms Mvubu of the Department of Public Service and Administration,also stressed that an informed and responsible citizenry is key to an active citizenry which is essential to the implementation of the National Development Plan.Comments by the panel were followed by thought provoking insight from the audience including, despite our differences we are essentially all human beings.  This means that while it is easy to demand our rights, we must as human beings, first and foremost protect the rights of our fellow human beings.  Legislation can only go so far in ensuring a redress of our country’s past inequalities – we must each play our part in making society safe for ourselves and others.A strong theme that emanated from the conversation was that a human rights based culture is our collective responsibility.  Government cannot create this society on its own.  We must all work together to achieve an equitable, human rights society.  This is a challenge to society as a whole as we commemorate 20 years of democracy.The discussion concluded with the sense that while South Africa has come a long way in 20 years, much work remains to be done to build a human rights based culture strongly rooted to the principle of responsibility based rights. Let us all play our part in this quest.Note to EditorsThe Constitution of South Africa can be accessed at: http://www.gov.za/documents/constitution/1996/a108-96.pdfAbout Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.About Play Your PartPlay Your Part is a nationwide campaign created to inspire, empower and celebrate active citizenship in South Africa.  It aims to lift the spirit of our nation by inspiring all South Africans to contribute to positive change, become involved and start doing – because a nation of people who care deeply for one another and the environment in which they live is good for everyone.Play Your Part is aimed at all South Africans – from corporates to individuals, NGOs to government, churches to schools, young to not so young.  It aims to encourage South Africans to use some of their time, money, skills or goods to contribute to a better future for all.There are numerous opportunities, big and small, for each and every South African to make a positive difference in the communities in which they live and operate. Play Your Part encourages them to act on these opportunities.The campaign is driven by the Brand South Africa. Further resources from Brand South AfricaMedia are invited to visit http://www.southafrica.info/ for further resources which can be reproduced without any copyright infringement.  Kindly attribute to Brand SouthAfrica.Join the conversation at:Follow Brand South [email protected]_SAhttps://twitter.com/Brand_SAhttps://www.facebook.com/BrandSouthAfricaTell us how you Play Your [email protected]://www.playyourpart.co.za/tellus-someoneFor more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Sandisiwe GugushePublic Relations International: Brand South AfricaTel: +27 11 712 5007 Mobile: +27 (0) 73 126 9128Email: [email protected]last_img read more

Weed answers for 2018 start this fall

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest So this year I am getting even more calls and comments on run-away marestail. “Last year I killed it,” is often the remark I hear, too. And following is my response regarding horseweed (Conyza canadensis), or marestail as it is known in OhioThis may be a new weed to you but the western side of the Ohio and particularly the southwest have been fighting it since about 2002. It takes a comprehensive effort, but it can be managed.Depending on severity and tillage in your system:For no-till soybeans — RoundupReady technology1. Spray a combination of 2,4-D and glyphosate in the fall after corn harvest (the biggest problem with horseweed is from late summer and fall germinating seed), or you can spray a combination of 2,4-D and dicamba in the fall.2. Spray a second burndown (this may be the glyphosate and 2,4-D as above or glyphosate plus Sharpen) in April and add your residual soybean herbicide — e.g. Trivence, Canopy, Authority, or your choice of many others, plus we usually add an extra two to four or six ounces of metribuzin. You can also spray a product like Boundary, again there are many options.3. Spray glyphosate in crop at three- to four-leaf soybeans. For tilled soybeans — RoundupReady technology1. Till shortly before planting and that means with an effective tillage tool, not one that just stirs the top inch or so.2. Before planting or immediately after, apply an effective pre-emergent herbicide.3. Apply glyphosate at three- to four-leaf soybeans. LibertLink technology — this is still a great option to manage horseweed and many other weeds that glyphosate has started to miss.1. If no-till, apply fall turndown as noted above.2. In the spring for no-till or tilled, apply pre-emergent herbicide before or at planting.3. At three- to four-leaf soybeans apply Liberty or generic glufosinate, in some cases a post grass product may also be needed and added. A second application may also be used if needed. I went this way in 2017, but really needed the second application for pigweeds (as in waterhemp). For conventional soybeans the practices are about the same as for RoundupReady technology. Most Marestail plants are resistant to glyphosate and we must eliminate them before planting. Use also a pre-emergent herbicide that is effective in preventing germination of new horseweeds.Dicamba beans are now available, and dicamba works great as part of the burndown with soybeans with this technology. It still requires a pre-emergent residual though.Find details in the Ohio, Indiana & Illinois Weed Control Guide, produced by our OSU Weed Specialist Mark Loux, from your local Extension office. The weed science team also has a blog posting some very well done videos on management: http://u.osu.edu/osuweeds/.last_img read more